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Author Topic: House hears arguments on hate crime law  (Read 2155 times)

rankeen

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House hears arguments on hate crime law
« on: January 29, 2005, 04:52:09 pm »


http://theunionleader.com/articles_showa.html?article=50130

New Hampshire is going the way of Massachusetts, as the loony left flee there from Boston, to avoid the consequences of their policies.

We are hearing the last few voices of principle there, as the mediocrities stampede them in a rush to the podium to condemn "hate" and praise "diversity".

The article notes that New Hampshire is "even more diverse" than when the law was passed. and that's true. The Leftist elites are not the only sewage seeping in from Boston; there are gangs of Ricans and Asians haunting Manchester now, and the Lutherans are shipping in Bantus from Africa as fast as they can.

Well, the unpleasant fact is that such "hate crime" legislation has huge popular support. It's feelgood law, the kind that the mobocracy eats with a spoon. And Attorney General Kelley makes the point that law already considers state of mind when determining penalties. There is no way that any court will ever strike down any hate crimes legislation, and for that mater, we may see courts ordering legislative bodies to pass such law, now that precedent has been set in both Massachusetts and Vermont for courts to order law to be passed.

What's more, it hardly matters if a state has hate crime law or not; the Feds do. So if the state prosecutors don't string you up for political crimes the Federal prosecutors will.

At this rate we're gonna need 60,000 Porcupines just to balance out this Marxist/Commie crap.
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SteveA

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2005, 08:48:49 pm »

Quote
"Normally a thought takes place before an action occurs," he said. In cases of hate, "There's a larger deterrent to doing that when a person knows that the sentence is going to be enhanced," Ross said.

So we're going to have lighter sentences on crimes people commit against someone they love or feel neutral toward?  Next time you rob someone's house, make sure it's a relative, friend or provable in court that it was an entirely random decision, so you can get off easier.  Yes, that makes sense. :P
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mvpel

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2005, 11:35:28 am »

Should we call for the repeal of the other sentencing enhancements such as crimes against old people, children, or the disabled, too?

"Hate" is mentioned nowhere in this law, it has entirely to do with the intent of the criminal as determined by a jury beyond a reasonable doubt.
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JonM

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2005, 12:22:18 pm »

The hearing is on the REPEAL of an existing hate crime law, not the enacting of a new one.
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Karl

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2005, 01:15:38 pm »

Should we call for the repeal of the other sentencing enhancements such as crimes against old people, children, or the disabled, too?

"Hate" is mentioned nowhere in this law, it has entirely to do with the intent of the criminal as determined by a jury beyond a reasonable doubt.

I think the difficulty with this repeal attempt is not that it is a "good idea" per se to repeal it, but that it wasn't a "good idea" to enact it in the first place.  Whenever one proposes enacting or repealing a law, one usually must make a compelling case to change the status quo.  The General Court and the Governor failed in this respect in 1989 when they enacted statute.  There was never a need, and the law has done nothing to reduce hate crimes.  It was not so much meant as a deterant as to send a message to constituents that the government is "doing something."  A pure 100% bona-fide feel-good measure.

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Dave Mincin

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2005, 01:30:25 pm »

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mvpel

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Re: House hears arguments on hate crime law
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2005, 09:21:19 pm »

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The General Court and the Governor failed in this respect in 1989 when they enacted statute.  There was never a need, and the law has done nothing to reduce hate crimes.

That may be, but it allows a stiffer punishment for bias-motivated crimes above the statutory maximum 15 years for first-degree assault and 7 years for second-degree assault.

There's already provisions in the law which deem some motives and mindsets in crime more blameworthy than others, for example extreme depravity or cruelty, taking advantage of old or disabled people, or attacking children.  This is just another category where the crime is deemed more repellent than usual and worthy of a harsher sentence.
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