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Author Topic: What made you sign up?  (Read 9269 times)

Simon Jester

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What made you sign up?
« on: October 11, 2004, 12:06:23 am »

I've hunted around the old threads and haven't found one that corresponds to this topic but as a "prospective member," read, someone who is seriously considering joining, I'm curious to know what made the FSP members sign up. What was the moment when you thought, "yes, I can do this"? Was it something you knew you would do as soon as you heard about it or was there something specific that gave you that final push? What's your motivation?
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Rearden

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2004, 12:51:16 am »

I signed up almost immediately upon reading about the FSP.  I want to live with a greater measure of freedom than I have now, and the sad simple truth is that the FSP is the only way that's going to happen.  The LP is almost completely worthless, and the vast majority of the country is all too happy to trade away their liberty for the promise of security.  It's the FSP, or nothing.

The choice really comes down to this: if you want more freedom than you have now, you've got to move for it.  If you stay where you are, you'll have to settle for less.

I'll be freer the moment I cross the state line into NH, and I'll be even freer with each passing election and legislative session.  

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antayla

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2004, 01:08:20 am »

The choice really comes down to this: if you want more freedom than you have now, you've got to move for it.  If you stay where you are, you'll have to settle for less.

Governmental competition :)
Now, what we gotta do is have distributed governmental competition.  That'll do them.

Oh, and I joined because I don't wanna pay for the war in Iraq, or any war.  I should have a right to refuse to pay for "protection."
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bookish_lass

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2004, 05:34:25 am »

50 years from now, I don't want to be explaining to my grandchildren why I didn't do more to stop the ever-growing US government.  I wrote a couple of pieces which should explain why I joined:

http://freestateproject.org/about/essay_archive/plea.php

http://freestateproject.org/about/essay_archive/notthecountry.php
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John

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2004, 02:10:37 pm »

New Hampshire is already the most free state.

On the 4th of July before the vote I wrote "Let Me Call You Home" as a love song to New Hampshire.
You can find it under Essays, July 2004.

I "made it home" in March.   ;D  Please join us.  You'll be glad you did.

Come home to Liberty!
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vtr

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2004, 05:05:30 pm »

For me it was when I met so many nice people at the 2004 Porcfest in  Lancaster, N.H.

I found that the FSP members I met there were people that I would be proud to associated with.  I was really impressed with the level of intelligence and comittment that they all displayed. Couldn't help but join after that.
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Simon Jester

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2004, 08:39:51 pm »

Quote
The LP is almost completely worthless, and the vast majority of the country is all too happy to trade away their liberty for the promise of security.

This is what I see as one of the best reasons for the FSP. In my homestate, the LP is not very big or active. We tend to make lazy activists and I think it would be very interesting to be on the cutting edge of the "small government movement." But this doesn't mean I'm not worried about it. Will the FSP be able to hold together once in NH and not break into splinter groups? There are a lot of groups represented: from more-republican types to anarchists.  This is what really worries me the most as it seems to lead to "Who's the most libertarian" competitions and accusing people of not being libertarian.
How annoying is that?? (Rhetorical question)

Quote
I joined because I don't wanna pay for the war in Iraq, or any war.  I should have a right to refuse to pay for "protection."
Does this mean you will also refuse the protection?


Quote
I "made it home" in March.    Please join us.  You'll be glad you did.
Oh, I'm weighing my options....leaning very heavily towards the "join" part, but I definitely want to find out more before I do.

And, bookish_lass, I found your articles to be very interesting reads and will probably spend some time gleaning the articles for more informations :)
Any one else who'd like to share?
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It matters not how strait the gate,
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Lasse P

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2004, 02:55:07 am »

I started to seek a more liberal nation in Europe about 2002. I did find some good, but nearly they all had some drawbacks. I needed at least learn a new language (minor problem) and most of the states where microstates to which moving is pretty hard because of the high regulation in it. I didn't consider US, because I was afraid of its poor political system.

Then I found the FSP. It didn't mean much to me at the start, but I was slowly considering it. After the idea had been around for about two months I started to research where in the states New Hampshire really is (had no idea) and how things are in there. My conclusion was that in NH I would have a lot more freedom then in anywhere Europe (probably excluding the Netherlands) and my tax rate would be smaller then anywhere in Europe, excluding the micro states. I also loved the idea of large companies and the good universities in NH and near it, so I made up my mind.
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Simon Jester

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2004, 10:25:56 pm »

Okay, Larry P., you're making me feel like a whimp. For you this is moving to a whole other country in order to participate in the FSP. Kudos! It's really hard to pick up and move to a new country---I couldn't imagine doing it permanently.
Out of curiousity, what do you mean by the U.S.'s poor political system.
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It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.

    William Ernest Henley

antayla

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2004, 02:38:32 am »

Does this mean you will also refuse the protection?

Of course.  If they'll let me.
Granted, I think I want to have recognized "rights" as the member of a "country"... or whatever.  But I'd really like to be able to more easily choose what organization those rights are granted under.  My dream is of a network of communities scattered throughout the globe that have a recognized membership and "authority."  Membership would be by consent only, and there would be no representative or direct democracy in such a system; it would all be "put your money where your mouth is" kinda actively invested "government."  New Hampshire could be a nexus for this network...

Ah well, one foot in front of the other...
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penguinsscareme

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2004, 06:45:37 am »

I had been complaining for years about the high taxes and unconstitutional laws imposed on us by the government.  When I found out about the fsp, I said to myself, Now here's a bunch of people who are tired of just idly complaining, they're actually putting their money where their mouth is.  I think I have to either join them or shut up.
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Old Nick

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2004, 06:50:46 am »

At least you're ambitious, Robin. I very much doubt that I'd have the patience to undertake such an effort, although I might become involved once it had finally started.

In any case, good luck. And I really mean that.
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antayla

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2004, 10:10:05 pm »

I actually am myself frustrated by the lack of concrete support for my ideas.  Everyone says "let me know when you get it going." Well it's GOING.  Honestly, all it would take is a core of organizations and individuals who were commited to the idea to lend the idea credence and spread the word.  And I don't presume to know all there is to know about mobilizing something like this.  I need input and real help.

  Thing is, unlike the FSP, no one would have to MOVE anywhere to support the network... and we could solicit investment funds to start "cleaning up" NH.  But the minute some uppity nation decided to start taking action against one of our members, each member could throw it's (nonviolent hopefully) voluntary weight behind support of the oppressed member.  This could be a true transnational balance against centralized powers.

I am going to visit NH and see if anything is going to come of the FSP.  But if I don't get inspiration from the people I find there it is likely I will set my ideas aside and fiddle while Rome burns.  Or something like that.  Everyone talks about freedom, the lefties go on about their idea of freedom, and the righies about theirs.  Maybe I'll get lucky and find a middle ground the real active radicals can agree on :P.  If not... well, I figure I got my own inner peace and that's all I really need.  Everything else is just gravy.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2004, 10:18:14 pm by Robin Canaday (antayla) »
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Lasse P

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2004, 07:28:20 am »

It's really hard to pick up and move to a new country

Actually moving to a different country is not that hard :). If the culture is familiar and you already know the language you'll be able to "fit in" within one year. The only major problem is to have a good start. You'll be in lot of trouble if you don't find work and social contacts from the beginning.

Out of curiousity, what do you mean by the U.S.'s poor political system.

I'll try to explain this briefly. Well the main problem with the US political system is that it's presidential, meaning that the president has nearly as much as power as a king when elected. These systems often work very poorly. When there's only one man governing he can pretty much keep most of the things unchanged. If you know a little about the EU nations and former larger English colonies you would find out that the personal freedom level is much higher there in most issues that it is in the US (for example gay marriages and cannabis laws).

Other thing that several political scientist also argue against are the majority voting system, which often leads to a two party system where the loosing vote practically gains nothing (for example here where I live we have three large parties and four notable smaller parties). I however like a majority voting system, since it's clear that that system is more effective in minimizing taxes (in proportional voting systems parties need to buy the votes, often via incensement of public spending).

Edit: Progressive -> proportional
« Last Edit: October 14, 2004, 12:33:41 pm by Larry P »
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Simon Jester

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Re:What made you sign up?
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2004, 08:15:00 pm »

Alright, posting time! I got busy and stopped checking up...this may take a while.
Onward!

Quote
My dream is of a network of communities scattered throughout the globe that have a recognized membership and "authority."  Membership would be by consent only, ...unlike the FSP, no one would have to MOVE anywhere to support the network... and we could solicit investment funds to start "cleaning up" NH.  But the minute some uppity nation decided to start taking action against one of our members, each member could throw it's (nonviolent hopefully) voluntary weight behind support of the oppressed member
This reminds me a lot of groups out there already, such as various homeschool organizations, the Catholic Church and a lot of political groups. Really, as far as limited government movements go, the Libertarian party and Buraeucrash are definitely community networks you use as examples. The FSP could definitely be a center for what you're talking about, if it gets off the ground properly and the FSP friends, who don't want to move, could form the groundwork for a national and even world-wide operation.


Quote
Well the main problem with the US political system is that it's presidential, meaning that the president has nearly as much as power as a king when elected.
Well, to be exact, the president wasn't supposed to have nearly as much power when the constitution was written as he does now. The system has eroded over time.  
And I did spend a year living in Germany and, I have to say, that I don't think the personal freedom level is higher over there at all.  Maybe in the fact that most of them do allow gay marriage, but they also believe that people saying anything against homosexuals is a punishable crime and that doesn't say a lot for freedom of speech, which IMO is the most important personal freedom of all.
Besides that,  things like heating, electricity and water are so expensive over there! In Germany the prices are kept high by the government in order to "encourage lower use and conservation," but if you think about it, it's just another way of control, especially when you don't have the income to spend a lot on utilities.  Then there are things like mandatory recycling, socialized health care, etc. I consider all of these to be part of my personal freedom since all of them affect my life in a major way.  In this way, we have a lot more freedom over in the U.S.
But that isn't to say that I think things are absolutely perfect over here, either. If I did, I wouldn't be seriously thinking about the FSP :)
I think the day is nearing when we, too, will have socialized health care and I won't be able to choose what kind of health care I get because it will be chosen for me already. And (quite possibly) the day will come when I will be forced to recycle my trash because it is the "right" thing to do.
I really don't want that to happen. And this brings me to....penguinsscareme's post.
Quote
I had been complaining for years about the high taxes and unconstitutional laws imposed on us by the government.  When I found out about the fsp, I said to myself, Now here's a bunch of people who are tired of just idly complaining, they're actually putting their money where their mouth is.  I think I have to either join them or shut up.
If this weren't me, it could be me.  
I think I will sign up. I've considered myself a libertarian for almost 5 years now but I haven't really done much to advance the idea of shrinking government outside of friends or family. This would be an opportunity to hang out with and get to know other people want to see some of the same things I do, even if a lot of them lean closer to the anarchist side of things :). It'll be an opportunity to "put my money where my mouth is."
  I think I can make it up there by by late 2006 or early 2007.  
Thanks, guys. It helps to hear what others say made them jump and realize that you see many of the same reasons within yourself....
Now I'm going to post this and fill out the FSP member form before I get cold feet ;)


Edit: Okay, this is frustrating: I've tried to fill out and submit the statement of intent form but each time it tells me that I need to change my username and email because they're already taken--by me as a friend of the FSP! Isn't there someway I can keep my username and email address that i used as a friend and just switch to a member??
« Last Edit: October 16, 2004, 08:31:48 pm by Geist »
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It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.

    William Ernest Henley
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