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Author Topic: status of foreigners  (Read 5986 times)

ootte

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status of foreigners
« on: October 22, 2002, 08:53:04 pm »

I'm currently a German citizen, and wonder how the status of foreigners will be handled in the Free State. A current visa does allow me to stay in the States for 90 days. What happens when I decide to move to the Free State and 90 days are gone?

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Oliver
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JasonPSorens

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2002, 09:50:06 am »

What we would try to do is to get you a job so that you can stay longer, achieve permanent resident status, and then acquire citizenship status if you choose.  I can't say I'm familiar with the particular immigration requirements here, but we do have foreign members and will do our best to make sure that they can stay and participate fully.
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

ootte

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2002, 10:23:43 am »


[...] but we do have foreign members [...]


How can I find them? Just call for them in forum? ;)

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JasonPSorens

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2002, 11:03:36 am »

Well, that's one way!  You'll also want to post a message to the email list,
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/freestateproject

I could perhaps pull out a list of our foreign members and send them all an email; the danger is that some of them may view this as a violation of privacy.

By the way, our Secretary, though an American citizen, is living in Germany.  You can reach him at simplulo@yahoo.com - his name is Steve Cobb.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2002, 11:04:29 am by Jason P. Sorens »
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

ootte

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2002, 11:19:54 am »

post a message to the email list,
I could perhaps pull out a list of our foreign members [...]
By the way, our Secretary, though an American citizen, is living in Germany.  


I'll contact Steve and post a message to the mailing list. I agree with you on the foreigners list. This wouldn't be a good idea.

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Penfist

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2002, 02:25:01 pm »

I'm a foreigner with U.S. Military Service and an honorable discharge. I would love to have the INS come try and mess with me.

The only reason I haven't naturalized is because after devoting four years of my life to government service, I find it insulting that they still expect me to fill out all their petty paperwork and pay a $300 filing fee to "join the club." I joined the club when I put on the uniform.

In my vision of a utopian society, those who contributed nothing would be forced out and those who had a net positive effect would be welcomed with open arms. Citizenship would be a privilege, not an accident of geography.
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rob_marlett

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2002, 03:45:36 am »

"In my vision of a utopian society, those who contributed nothing would be forced out and those who had a net positive effect would be welcomed with open arms. Citizenship would be a privilege, not an accident of geography"
I'd already figured out that I liked you... now I respect ya too. that's the best immigration and naturalization policy I've ever heard of !!!!! And from a natural born citizen, to what should be a naturalized citizen - thanks for your service.
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Childe Folly

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Re:status of foreigners
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2002, 11:36:37 pm »

I might be able to shed a little light on this situation. My boyfriend is Canadian and is currently residing in the US (and yes, he has signed up for FSP!)

There are 4 ways to immigrate to the US and obtain a permanent "green card" (right to work).

1. Marry a US citizen. This usually works, but does not always. I have had a number of friends that this worked for, but I have had ONE friend who was denied a green card. I don't know why.

2. Get a company to sponsor you. (this is the way my bf is here) This is one of the more difficult ways. The reason being - what company is going to want to hand over several thousand to get you a green card, if they don't know if you're good enough.

3. Have an insanely huge amount of money and want to start a business in the US. You have to have well developed business plans and stroke the government's ego a bit.

4. Win the diversity lottery. This is the way that most visible minorities get in. Translation: if you are a white male, forget it.

Another option is to get in to the US on a student visa - those are fairly easy. You just have to maintain full time status at an accredited university and prove that you have the money to pay for it.


Here is a side option - What about getting a dual citizenship with Canada and then immigrating to the US on that? (of course, this would be an "all else fails" option) The US and Canada have this deal called "NAFTA" - which enables Canadian citizens get "TN" visas. These are good for 1 year for work at the company that sponsors it. All the company has to do is write a letter to be taken to a port of entry. This happens to be the specific route my bf is taking - the company said they'd pay to get the permanent green card after they tried him out for a year and decided they like him.


NOW! On to citizenry. I believe you have to be a permanent US resident for 5 years or something like that before you can apply to be a US Citizen. Once you get to this point, it involves taking examinations (physical, written tests), filling out massive amounts of paperwork, going in for interviews with the INS, and of course - paying money. It is a long process, and the INS is known to screw up, delaying people's applications and conveniently "losing" them - requiring them to start the whole multi-year process over again (has happened to a wife of a friend of mine - she's been here 13 years).

Thats the quick-quick brain dump. If you want more info, I'll get my bf to dig out the INS websites on immigration laws.

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