Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Weather  (Read 2839 times)

maverickthree

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 912
    • LibertyDistricts2008
Weather
« on: February 27, 2004, 01:39:37 pm »

In the opinion of you dearly beloved N.H. residents(they say flattery
will get you everywhere!!), do you think the winters in your neck of
the woods have gotten more severe over the past decade? Your
insights would be most welcome. What are your average winter
temperatures and how much snow do you usually get?
Logged
Evil men rule when good men do nothing.

Those with the best information are most likely to succeed.

Extremism in the pursuit of liberty is no vice. And moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.
          ----Barry Goldwater

SethA

  • FSP Participant
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 306
Re:Weather
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2004, 03:01:52 pm »

You can find a lot of good NH weather information at this private, NH site. www.weatherlook.com

They are having a snow drought (much less than normal snow fall) this winter in many parts of the state. Total precip amounts have also been below normal in Jan. and Feb.
Logged

bevr

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
  • I'm a llama!
Re:Weather
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2004, 07:49:12 pm »

I have lived in NH for two winters (initially moved from Oregon.)  I live in Keene (near the VT border.)  Last winter was a nightmare - I was ready to move back to Oregon (I was in the middle of a white out on christmas day 2002...)  This winter has been great  (though very frigid at times.)  I think if you become involved in winter sports that you will eventually like the season.  My favorite season is Summer - lakes are everywhere here - wow.

Bev
Logged

Pawlno1

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
  • Wher were you in seventy-two
Re:Weather
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2004, 10:59:40 pm »

over the past 20 years the weather has become milder
some year the great ponds don't freeze over and we only get a few storms with 18 inches of snow a year
Logged

Gerry LaVallee

  • FSP Participant
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 33
  • Hunting, camping, or both.......too many choices
Re:Weather
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2004, 06:49:41 pm »

 I currently live in upstate New York (southern foothills of the Adirondacks) I am thinking that the weather would be similar in the Newport area and alittle north of there? Am I wrong? The average snowfall in my area is 65"/yr, we have had a few nights at -20f
Logged
I work, because millions on welfare depend on me.

JohnfromDerry

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 48
  • I see dead people.
Re:Weather
« Reply #5 on: February 29, 2004, 07:10:43 pm »

I'd have to say the weather has gotten milder over the last decade or so. I remember back in the mid '90's every summer seemed to get hotter and hotter with humidity up around 95% but the last couple of years things haven't been nearly so bad. The winters seem to be generally more mild now than I remember as a kid, although we've had some times in the last 3 or 4 years where windchills have gotten down well below zero (which I guess counts as cold  ;)) In terms of snow, I remember one winter some years ago we only had a couple of feet but now we seem to be back to normal (by normal I mean it snows in November/December and you don't see the ground again until the spring)
Logged
"Live free or die; Death is not the worst of evils."
-Gen. John Stark

Mike Lorrey

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2745
  • Live Free and Never Die
    • The International Libertarian
Re:Weather
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2004, 01:17:49 pm »

Yeah, we've had 4-5 feet of total snowfall so far this winter, and about 1.5-2 feet are remaining on the ground here at 1200' altitude. We should get another 2-4 feet between now and Easter.

I recall in the early 1980's when we barely got any snow at all. Typically we get a significant thaw in the 3-4th week of January as well that melts most of it away, but we didn't get that this winter.

Right now the temp is in the low 40's and I am shoveling ice and snow off my deck. It was warm enough the past week to have a crew of fellows reshingle my roof. They say that they work all through the winter. Some days it's tough to get going in the morning, but once at it, they generate their own heat in plenty.

This is the heart of the 'sugaring season'. When it is above freezing in the day and below freezing at night in late winter, the maple sap starts to flow up and down through the trees (known as 'sugar bushes'). Tapping the trees allows you to drain a good fraction of this sap off to boil down into maple syrup.
Logged
The International Libertarian: The Journal of Liberty For Everyone, Everywhere, All The Time
Pages: [1]   Go Up