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Author Topic: Another NH Advantage  (Read 10800 times)

aa777888

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Another NH Advantage
« on: October 14, 2002, 07:53:22 am »

Wow, the FSP. I had never heard of it prior to a recent front page article in my local NH newspaper. What a great idea!

I think it would be great to have everyone move to NH, so I thought I'd mention another great thing about this state (forgive me if this has already been discussed). That is, we have fantastic resources for personal defense training. A few examples: Sigarms academy, a top of the line school, is right in Exeter, NH. The NH Tactical Arts Group provides a weekly venue for training at the Nashua Fish & Game
Association, with courses of fire you would ordinarily have to pay hundred of dollars to experience at places like Sig or Gunsight. Your cost: $10 a week for non-members. TAG also sponsors more formal courses, featuring the notable John Farnam curriculum several times a year. LFI is located in Concord, NH. There are several other smaller organizations with nationally recognized instructors in various disciplines both in NH and nearby Massachusetts. If you can get past the politics, S&W Academy has an excellent curriculum and
is located in nearby Springfield, MA.

Forgive the shameless plug for my state, and here's hoping to see the FSP in NH soon!

aa
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Heyduke

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2002, 09:59:12 am »

Hey--break out the cots and sleeping bags...20,000 people is larger than the population of Goffstown...hell, there are fewer than a dozen cities in NH with a greater population than 20k...so how many are you going to put up?  How many jobs are you going to offer?  

Perhaps instead of inviting people into the state to try and change things--you could become a grassroots activist and change things from within?  After all--you're already in NH...

?
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Sons of Liberty

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2002, 09:28:03 pm »

Heyduke:  According to the latest census, NH has 1,235,786 people.  Adding 20,000 will be increasing the population by 1.6% (assuming of course that none of those 20,000 ALREADY live in NH).  I don't see that as being a big deal.  Don't underestimate the power of the free market.

aa777888:  I have gone to several of the events/schools that you mention and I concur.  NH does have a lot to offer in this area.  Don't forget to mention that Mitch Rosen is headquartered in Manchester, and Sig is in Exeter.  But something tells me you like tupperware ;-)  

Regards,
SOL
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Heyduke

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2002, 09:34:01 pm »

So by looking at the number 1.6% you can completely ignore the population density concern?  how many towns larger than 15,000 people can you count?  And you think that 20,000 can be absorbed infrastructurally...just...like...that?  20,000 people showing up without jobs or homes?  Yes, I realize that it won't be like a busload of migrant farmworkers showing up one day, but still--how do you phase in 20,000 people in such a way that they will still live within sufficient proximity to 'improve' the state from local political activity?

That's all I'm saying SOL...stand down bub...
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Mega Joule

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2002, 05:33:14 am »


So by looking at the number 1.6% you can completely ignore the population density concern?  how many towns larger than 15,000 people can you count?  And you think that 20,000 can be absorbed infrastructurally...just...like...that?  20,000 people showing up without jobs or homes?

First let me say that I fully understand your concerns.  They are legitimate questions that require careful consideration.  I personally advocate moving to one of the large western states because I want to avoid crowds.  That said, consider that we are only at around 1,300 members right now and the state will not be decided until we reach 5,000.  At that point some members would likely begin relocating though it may be a couple more years before reaching 20,000.  This starts the transition off slowly.  Next consider that the FSP plan is for members (once we reach 20,000) to move to the chosen state over a five-year period, again a gradual transition.
Quote

Yes, I realize that it won't be like a busload of migrant farmworkers showing up one day, but still--how do you phase in 20,000 people in such a way that they will still live within sufficient proximity to 'improve' the state from local political activity?

You’ve said it yourself.  We will not be a mass of uneducated, unskilled laborers.  Yes we will need homes and jobs, but we will bring more than just needs to the state we relocate to.  Our presence, as consumers, will boost local economies.  As we move into jobs we will also be creating jobs.  


Meg
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aa777888

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2002, 08:29:18 am »

Yo SOL: you've obviously got my number  ;)

Heyduke: I hear you, but if grassroots worked, it would have already worked by now, and there are better people than me by far that have already tried and failed. It's hard to change people's minds. That's one reason why the FSP is such a cool idea. Don't try to change their minds, just ask like-minded people to band together in one place, right?

As Meg said, it's going to be a gradual transition, not a 20K dump.

Meg, one other nice thing about NH is that it may provide a better mix of population densities, thus appealing to a broader FSP audience. Want isolation, live in the "North country". Want something busier, or even urban, then live South of Concord.


aa

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Solitar

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2002, 10:45:33 am »

Quote
how many towns larger than 15,000 people can you count?
I did that. Answers for all states are posted over at:
Ranking state by cities over 13,000 people
http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?board=5;action=display;threadid=569

Note that these are the cities or towns themselves, not the entire metro areas.

So adding 20,000 to New Hampshires 349,401 (in cities over 13,000 people) yields six percent.

Note also that New Hampshire is annually getting thousands immigrants from south of their border whether they like it or not. They may as well include liberty-minded Free Staters in addition to the socialists from Mass.

BTW, I'm originally from north central Pennsylvania. There are lots of conservative independent liberty-minded folk in that area that would make most New Hampshirites look like socialists.
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redbeard

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2002, 12:43:18 pm »

Hey, can you post links to any of the schools you mentioned?
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Sons of Liberty

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2002, 02:52:26 pm »

So by looking at the number 1.6% you can completely ignore the population density concern?  how many towns larger than 15,000 people can you count?  And you think that 20,000 can be absorbed infrastructurally...just...like...that?  20,000 people showing up without jobs or homes?  Yes, I realize that it won't be like a busload of migrant farmworkers showing up one day, but still--how do you phase in 20,000 people in such a way that they will still live within sufficient proximity to 'improve' the state from local political activity?

That's all I'm saying SOL...stand down bub...

Sorry man, I don't mean to give you a hard time.   :)  

Sure, if 20,000 people showed up in downtown Derry one day, they'd have one hell of a traffic jam.  But, if NH was chosen by FSP, and all 20,000 decided to move here, it will happen over several years, and the distribution taking place over the entire state roughly in proportion to the current population density.  I am not too concerned because I doubt a single one of the 20,000 is going to show up demanding free stuff at taxpayer expense, like many of our other newcomers do (e.g. my town just authorized the replacement of the high school band uniforms at taxpayer expense!  WTF!)  

But that being the case, you bring up a valid point...  How can 20,000 more libertarians be effective politically if they are distributed across the entire state?  I may be off base here, but we probably already have 50,000 in state and we are having a tough time fending off the big govt. types as it is.  Will 20,000 more help?  I don't know the answer to that but it can't make it any worse.  

Regards,
SOL  
« Last Edit: October 15, 2002, 02:53:48 pm by Sons of Liberty »
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aa777888

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2002, 08:14:02 pm »


Hey, can you post links to any of the schools you mentioned?


http://www.sigarms.com/academy/index.asp
http://www.nhtag.org/
http://www.ayoob.com/
http://www.smith-wesson.com/acd/new.htm

and a few smaller but no less distinguished operations that I don't have the URLs for...
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redbeard

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2002, 08:30:08 pm »

Gracias.
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JT

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2002, 09:17:24 pm »

Personally, I think NH is just too small.  The only eastern state we should consider is Maine, and that's kind of iffy.   Western states are MUCH larger and would be better equipped to absorb 20k people.  
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Mega Joule

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2002, 04:20:49 am »


Personally, I think NH is just too small.  The only eastern state we should consider is Maine, and that's kind of iffy.   Western states are MUCH larger and would be better equipped to absorb 20k people.  



And if any of the western states (excluding Alaska) were picked, there would be four other states neighboring that were also candidate states.  These would provide lots of room for free state members and ideas to eventually spread.

Meg
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JT

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2002, 12:00:57 pm »

Exactly!!!
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radracer

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Re:Another NH Advantage
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2003, 03:55:08 pm »

I'm with JT. I'd rather move to a big western state with lots of room so we would not seemingly crowd anyone, (although even 20,000 people spread evenly over any state would not be very noticeable).
As far as how Libertarian NH is take a look at something I got off Libertarian Clips today.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/ALLPOLITICS/05/29/parental.notification.ap/index.html

CONCORD, New Hampshire (AP) -- New Hampshire lawmakers approved a bill Thursday to require notification of a parent or judge before girls under 18 can get abortions, giving the state its only law regulating abortion.
Gov. Craig Benson said he would sign the bill in the coming days.
"We ask children to get their parents' permission to get their ears pierced, to take an aspirin at school," Benson said. "I think this law finally puts all parental notification on the same footing."
The bill, which takes effect December 31, requires minors to notify a parent 48 hours before getting an abortion or, as an alternative, get permission from a judge. It doesn't give parents or judges veto power.
Planned Parenthood of New England said the vote ended decades "of libertarian heritage that respected reproductive freedom and medical privacy."
Citizens for Life, the New Hampshire affiliate of the National Right to Life Committee, called the bill "a vital element in abortion reform."
« Last Edit: May 31, 2003, 03:56:26 pm by radracer »
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