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Author Topic: Is the hunting good up there?  (Read 3635 times)

bugsbunny04

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Is the hunting good up there?
« on: January 25, 2004, 11:51:02 pm »

I wanna know if the hunting is good, and how should my Mossberg 500 12 ga. be equiped (what type of barrels, what assortment of ammo) for maximum meat? Do I get to use a rifled slug barrel for deer? Is there is sort of big/medium/small game that is fairly unique to the area? How expensive is the licensing? Do rivers have fish in them? What kind? If you have anything else to add, feel free, I've never been north of Baltimore ???
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2004, 10:34:06 am »

I'm probably the most experienced NH resident hunter here.

We've got white tail deer which range from 100-275 lbs in size. There are more deer than in colonial times, but more of the state is getting bought by non-residents who post their land, so there is increasingly less open land for hunting. Annual harvest is typically over 10,000. There are three seasons: bow season, muzzle loader season, and rifle season. You can use your rifled slug shotgun during rifle season. Make sure you bring an old hunting license from your home state with you when you buy a license here to avoid having to retake a hunter safety course. Bowhunting has its own safety course.

If you are not going to be hunting in open fields, I highly recommend deer hunting with a pistol like a good .44 magnum. Much of the woodlands here is rather close quarters, and most deer are shot within 25 yards. The bucks are very smart and must be called in if you are on stand. Stalking and tracking of bucks will often cause them to circle around over hill spurrs to inspect their backtrails. Does are not so smart, primarily because they are only hunted one day a year in part of the state.

We have moose that will range 600-1200 lbs. Permits for moose are awarded by lottery and assigned to about 30 zones across the state, which those who apply for permits rank their own preferences (the lottery is sorta like Condorcets with probability thrown in). Typically about 700 moose are harvested a year, which is about 75% of permits granted. Permit winners can declare a second hunter on their permit. Both must attend moose school.

We have black bear, wild turkey, pheasant, coyote, goose, duck, partridge (grouse), woodcock, and dove seasons. All are plentiful. Coyote is open season, as are other non-native nuisances like wild boar (these are typically escapees from hunting preserves like Corbin Park).

A skilled hunting team in a woodcock covert can bring home over a dozen in a morning's outing without difficulty. Trained dogs are recommended for these and for grouse.

On grouse, there are two species here: ruffed grouse and spruce grouse. Spruce grouse are a protected species, are generally rare and reside in higher elevations, while ruffed grouse like lowlands and midlands. Spruce grouse generally hang out in spruce and other coniferous trees and will often let out a whooping shriek like a monkey before flushing.

Road hunting is illegal here. Game wardens will regularly set up decoy animals along roads to entrap individuals who road hunt, typically deer or pheasant. They are automated robots in some cases, even, so don't be fooled when a roadside animal moves an ear or head.

A resident hunting and fishing license with all the tags (deer, bear, turkey) will cost about $45. If you are hunting any migratory fowl like duck, geese, etc you must get stamps for those as well, which cost extra.
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bugsbunny04

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2004, 10:12:27 pm »

Hey Doc, whats up with the does? They only get hunted one day of the year? Down here you can shoot, theoretically, 90 a year, during rifle season alone. That has much to do with Does out numbering the Bucks 3:1 and too many areas are near stripped of vegitation, but anyway, Is there any particular reason? In your opinion, will a 357. Mag with 4 inches and full power 158's be addequate? I am one of those economy minded folks, And I figure an L-Frame will be cheeper than an N-frame, (I geuss, I don't ussualy shoot anything but autos) and ammo with a 158 gr. projectile is probably cheeper than something with a 240 gr. projectile. who knows, I could be wrong, but a L-frame would still be lighter to carry than an N-frame, especially if I used it as my spare, for when the .45 is out of commision for some trivial reason. Also, would it be good for the boar? Are the wild boars typically of some edible variety, or are they like the ones around here? Is there any sort of bounty for Coyote? I've no experience with varmint shooting, but it sure sounds fun, so I'll have to try it some day. I'm geussing those Bears are going to require the 3 in. Mag slugs that honestly, make me wonder why I don't just go back to rifles, huh? What sort of edible creatures have open seasons applicable to them? Appreciate the information. Good luck and Good Hunting.
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Synap

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2004, 01:20:12 pm »

My dad has hunted partridge and rabbits his whole life in northern NH.  Along with the occasional deer and (now) turkey.  He also catches many trout and salmon primarily from trolling but is also a good fly-fisherman (ties his own).

He has no plans to ever leave, so it can't be that bad.
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2004, 04:55:58 pm »

Hey Doc, whats up with the does? They only get hunted one day of the year? Down here you can shoot, theoretically, 90 a year, during rifle season alone. That has much to do with Does out numbering the Bucks 3:1 and too many areas are near stripped of vegitation, but anyway, Is there any particular reason?

Firstly, they ain't the size of rabbits up here like they are down there. I heard one fellow this season shot a 210 lb doe up near Colebrook. She was 7 years old too. Big old bitch.

We don't have year round summer, either, so we don't get exponential growth in the populations. Between the harsh winters, the coyotes, the wolves the state won't admit are here, the population is rather easily maintained with about 10,000 harvested each year by people.

We also have a tradition that property owners leave their lands open for hunters, so those who don't hunt their land enough get their herd maintained, and those who don't have land can hunt. This is changing as more non-natives buy up land and post it against hunters, totally ignorant of the ingrained culture here of civilian wildlife management. The most highway deer problems we have are always around lands posted by non-resident owners.

We also keep the population down by the bucks only policy. The buck season, between bow, muzzleloader, and rifle, lasts 3 months.

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In your opinion, will a 357. Mag with 4 inches and full power 158's be addequate?


Hell yeah. Before .44 Magnum was created, that was the standard round for deer hunting by handgun. Plenty of power. Probably not a good idea to use on moose, though, unless you were real close and could get a head shot.

Quote
I am one of those economy minded folks, And I figure an L-Frame will be cheeper than an N-frame, (I geuss, I don't ussualy shoot anything but autos) and ammo with a 158 gr. projectile is probably cheeper than something with a 240 gr. projectile. who knows, I could be wrong, but a L-frame would still be lighter to carry than an N-frame, especially if I used it as my spare, for when the .45 is out of commision for some trivial reason. Also, would it be good for the boar?

I know that Old Man Ruger used to shoot boar night and day with .44 magnum at Corbin Park. He field tested the original .44 carbine in Africa on warthogs.

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Are the wild boars typically of some edible variety, or are they like the ones around here?

I know they are edible, as all the ones here are derived from those that have escaped from Corbin Park. These escapees are rare these days, but every few years there is a new breakout when trees fall across the fence. Corbin Park members have to shoot something like 90 boar a year to keep the population down inside the park, and I know that many give the meat away as holiday presents.

Quote

 Is there any sort of bounty for Coyote? I've no experience with varmint shooting, but it sure sounds fun, so I'll have to try it some day. I'm geussing those Bears are going to require the 3 in. Mag slugs that honestly, make me wonder why I don't just go back to rifles, huh? What sort of edible creatures have open seasons applicable to them? Appreciate the information. Good luck and Good Hunting.

I'm not aware of any bounty at the moment here in NH on coyote. I've found it is really easy to hunt them immediately after you get a deer. Field dress it in a good spot where you can view from a good stand. Just leave the gut pile in an open location. Smear some blood on the trees to help the wind carry the scent. By dusk you will usually attract a pack, and you can pick them off at leisure. The more you shoot, the more you attract...

My brother shot a 275 lb bear several years ago with his 7mm rifle without difficulty, from over 200 yards.

Turkey have two seasons, one in spring and another in fall. We've also added a crossbow tag which you can use to hunt during the rifle season.

NH is currently free of Chronic Wasting Disease, a deer infection that the herds in a number of other states suffer from. Importing unsterilized deer products from infected states is prohibited.

Open seasons: Coyote, Skunk, Weasel, Woodchuck

The full official NH Fish & Wildlife Agency hunters manual for the Sept 2003-August 2004 season is here:
http://wildlife.state.nh.us/Hunting/Hunting_PDFs/Hunting_Digest_2003_04.pdf
« Last Edit: January 29, 2004, 04:57:06 pm by Mike Lorrey »
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Ogre11

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2004, 02:32:52 pm »

I'm probably the most experienced NH resident hunter here.

Excellent info, Mike.  Any plans to lead any FSP hunts as more of us arrive?  Ok, so that just might tarnish the image...but when I arrive, I might have to look you up to do some hunting.

Do you do any fishing?  The only place I've been fishing near there is up in the St. Lawrence where the musky's were loads of fun to try and get in the boat.
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2004, 03:09:27 pm »

I'm probably the most experienced NH resident hunter here.

Excellent info, Mike.  Any plans to lead any FSP hunts as more of us arrive?  Ok, so that just might tarnish the image...but when I arrive, I might have to look you up to do some hunting.

Do you do any fishing?  The only place I've been fishing near there is up in the St. Lawrence where the musky's were loads of fun to try and get in the boat.

I'm planning on putting together some expeditions. A friend who is a state legislator also has an extensive set of clays ranges around his home and likes to invite people. I'm gonna try to talk him into hosting a Libertarian Tournament.

I fly fish. There are plenty of trout in many rivers, though the rainbow are most plentiful in areas which run through limestone (they are sensitive to ph and need the limestone to nullify the acid rain.) We have atlantic salmon in a number of rivers, landlocked salmon in Lake Winnepesaukee as well as many other species. Brown trout are found in a number of deep river holes,  and golden trout are native to just a couple ponds here. There is good bass fishing in many lakes and marshes, though the hornpout do not get very big here compared to the catfish elsewhere.

A number of rivers are fly fishing only, and a number of ponds and lakes have engine size limitations.

I will fish the Mascoma River Valley and Eastman Pond around here, and will otherwise fish the Androscoggin, Magalloway, Swift and Dead Diamond Rivers, Clear Stream (really good rainbow), Mill Stream in Stark. I have not fished it, but I hear the fishing around Negro Island in the Connecticut River is outsanding (this island was where escaped slaves lived who worked the farms in the Valley. Large trout are very frequently caught in the Connecticut, but I don't fish it much cause in my opinion there are too many sewage treatment plants upstream of Lebanon (okay, I'm paranoid, one is too many for me, but I'm a snob). I know quite a few people who fish it and eat their catch without problem, and some rather massive fish have been pulled out of that river. I know of 40 inch Brownies that have been pulled out of the hole where the Mascoma empties into the Connecticut.
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Ogre11

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Re:Is the hunting good up there?
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2004, 03:39:35 pm »

I'm planning on putting together some expeditions. A friend who is a state legislator also has an extensive set of clays ranges around his home and likes to invite people. I'm gonna try to talk him into hosting a Libertarian Tournament.

There are plenty of trout in many rivers, though the rainbow are most plentiful in areas which run through limestone (they are sensitive to ph and need the limestone to nullify the acid rain.) We have atlantic salmon in a number of rivers, landlocked salmon in Lake Winnepesaukee as well as many other species. Brown trout are found in a number of deep river holes,  and golden trout are native to just a couple ponds here. There is good bass fishing in many lakes and marshes, though the hornpout do not get very big here compared to the catfish elsewhere.

Ok now, I'm officially drooling.  Time to do more job planning for the move!
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