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Author Topic: NH Tips  (Read 14477 times)

Jhogun

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NH Tips
« on: December 28, 2003, 07:15:01 am »

Life in a far northern state will probably have quite a few surprises for those of us from milder climates.  For example, I understand that when the roads get icy you have to put some kind of chain on your tires, but down here in Florida I've never seen any such chains and wouldn't know what to do with them.  

Any of you current NH residents or any other nearby state) have any tips for us moving up there so that we don't look quite so dumb to the natives? Stuff like leaving your water dripping when its supposed to freeze so that your pipes don't freeze (or what the heck you do with tire chains).  Anything you can think of that might help.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2003, 07:16:21 am by Jhogun »
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BillG

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2003, 07:37:34 am »

just buy a good pair of studless, snow tires...like Bridgestone Blizzaks and you'll be fine.
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2003, 10:03:05 am »

Snow tires, or all seasons, are all that are generally needed. I use Cooper all-terrains on my Cherokee, and I while I have chains, I haven't used them once since I bought them several years ago.

Yes, if you live in a house with plumbing through outside walls, or with poor insulation, you should leave your faucets open a crack to drip. This isn't to keep the water flowing, it is to allow any ice building up to have some place to push the water. Ice forming in the pipe will take up more space than the water it is made from, so it will expand linearly along the pipe and cause water pressure to build up if you don't give that trapped water some place to flow. It isn't the ice that breaks the pipes, it is the pressurized water.

If your roof is poorly insulated or poorly ventilated, it will tend to form ice dams. What happens is the heat flowing to the shingles melts the snow, and flows down to the edge. At the edge, it contacts the open air and freezes, forming an ice dam. This dam backs the water that is still flowing down up under the shingles, and can soak into the roof interior, ruining insulation, sheet rock, etc. This snow will melt a lot around chimneys, sky lights, and above where can lighting is mounted in the ceiling of the top floor.

If this happens, you need to get a snow rake with long extendable handles and rake the snow off the roof. Also, remove the gutters in the fall, as they will tend to fill up with ice and exacerbate the problem.

Snow shoveling is a pain in the butt. A lot of people hire a local person with a plow on their pickup to plow their driveway. Most people have a snow blower or snow thrower of some sort. Important features are a tall auger to handle deep snow and the ability to throw snow a good distance. You also want your snow blower to have powered wheels. Whether you get this as a walk behind unit, or a setup that you can mount on your riding lawn tractor doesn't matter much. Keep the battery charged.

Outside christmas decorations: set them up early, in October before the snow flies, right after you finish blowing all your fall leaves around the yard. Trust me.

Get some deer alerts for your car. You don't want to hit one of these animals at high speed, and you certainly won't survive hitting a moose.

Get to know your local farmers. They will have prices on milk, eggs, apples, maple syrup, and other local products at half the store prices and they will have fresher product. They are also good people to know if you are going to start a vegetable garden, they can tell you when to plant to avoid the frosts.
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Bruce_Morgan

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2003, 07:00:16 pm »

Snow tires, or all seasons...

Mike,

This is the most useful post I've seen in a while.  Thank you, and keep 'em coming!

Bruce
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2003, 07:18:23 pm »

If you move here and buy land, check your wooded areas for maple trees. If you are in a homecraft mode, you might find getting into maple syrup production to be useful. No, syrup is not a necessary food, but it is a natural source of sugar that is healthier than bleached cane sugar and has significant mineral content. It is also a very nice thing to make yourself for christmas gifts to friends in other parts of the country. Books on maple syruping are available online and at bookstores, and local farmers, again, are useful sources of information on this craft.

If you have land with flowing water with any degree of drop, you can make a device that uses no power to pump water up to a tank reservoir for water pressure in your home plumbing. Called a hydraulic ram, the device uses a drop, or 'head' of water to pump a small fraction of it to a higher altitude. For example, a 3 foot head with a flow of 100 gallons an hour will pump 10 gallons an hour to an altitude of almost 30 feet. Google the term 'hydraulic ram' for more info. You can build these yourself or buy them online.

Modern homes do not always lend themselves to wood burning of any volume. Modern energy efficient design seeks to minimize the draftiness of a home, but fuel burning devices need significant airflow. If your home has one or two fireplaces plus a wood stove, you may find that you can't run all of these at one time. One of the chimneys or the stove will develop a draft to feed the fires burning elsewhere. State of the art devices like Renai propane heaters or pelletized wood stoves try to bring cold air into the stove from the outside for burning.
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Jhogun

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2003, 04:57:58 pm »

If your roof is poorly insulated or poorly ventilated, it will tend to form ice dams. What happens is the heat flowing to the shingles melts the snow, and flows down to the edge. At the edge, it contacts the open air and freezes, forming an ice dam. This dam backs the water that is still flowing down up under the shingles, and can soak into the roof interior, ruining insulation, sheet rock, etc. This snow will melt a lot around chimneys, sky lights, and above where can lighting is mounted in the ceiling of the top floor.

If this happens, you need to get a snow rake with long extendable handles and rake the snow off the roof. Also, remove the gutters in the fall, as they will tend to fill up with ice and exacerbate the problem.

Snow shoveling is a pain in the butt. A lot of people hire a local person with a plow on their pickup to plow their driveway. Most people have a snow blower or snow thrower of some sort. Important features are a tall auger to handle deep snow and the ability to throw snow a good distance. You also want your snow blower to have powered wheels. Whether you get this as a walk behind unit, or a setup that you can mount on your riding lawn tractor doesn't matter much. Keep the battery charged.

Outside christmas decorations: set them up early, in October before the snow flies, right after you finish blowing all your fall leaves around the yard. Trust me.

Get some deer alerts for your car. You don't want to hit one of these animals at high speed, and you certainly won't survive hitting a moose.

Get to know your local farmers. They will have prices on milk, eggs, apples, maple syrup, and other local products at half the store prices and they will have fresher product. They are also good people to know if you are going to start a vegetable garden, they can tell you when to plant to avoid the frosts.

See, this is exactly what I'm talking about. Most of this stuff I wouldn't have even known enough to ask about.  Thanks, ML.  
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2003, 05:28:27 pm »

Salt or sand?

A perrenial question for NH motorists. The NH highway department likes salt, as do many motorists, because it doesn't require cleaning the roads in the spring and doesn't cause pitting of the vehicle paint job. Problem is that if your car is insufficiently undercoated, it will corrode. Plastic body technologies are helping to alleviate some of this, but suspension parts are still metal, as is the exhaust system and other components like brakes. Salt is also bad for the environment. Salted snowmelt by the roads can cause trees to die and interfere with wetlands animals like frogs and salamanders.

You can buy salt at your local hardware store in several varieties: mined rock salt (sodium chloride) or synthetics like potassium chloride or calcium chloride. Salt is useless in areas where water will pool up, it melts through the ice to the bottom, and the top freezes back over, and is generally more slick than it was originally. However it is really good for helping to break up ice enough to chop the rest of it away.

While it isn't good for the roads, I recommend sand for driveways. It absorbs sunlight, so it does some melting, but more importantly it provides traction on top of the ice that remains. Just be sure to have a good scrubby door mat to scrub sand out of your shoe soles.
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2004, 09:37:01 am »

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/housingandclothing/DK1068.html

The University of Minnesota (figures) put this report on its website by some students regarding the phenomenon of ice dams on building roofs. Highly recommended for those migrating to NH.
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Carp

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2004, 02:21:09 pm »

The Northeast is lovely.  Generally speaking, unless you're living off the beaten path, you'll have little trouble.  In December I drove through many of the cities and towns of New Hampshire taking drive-by snap-shots.  Mostly of the town centers, some residential, and some scenery.  I'll let you all know when I get them up somewhere on the web.
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lgwright

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2004, 07:13:28 am »

If you buy a home heated with oil (and please do -- our electricity rates are THE HIGHEST in the nation), absolutely make sure you prebuy your year's supply of heating oil in the summer from a reputable heating oil company. Otherwise, they'll screw you in the winter when the price jumps .50 a gallon.
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Tracy Saboe

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2004, 10:20:48 pm »

Humm.

Our oil and gas here tends to get cheaper in the winter. But this is South Dakota. Maybe it gets a lot colder in NH?

Tracy
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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2004, 02:01:43 am »

Yeah Tracy, that's how it werks.
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dougdnh

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2004, 04:08:42 pm »

As a resident of New Hampshire, I am reading with some amusement many of the comments on this site. One person is excited because a Target may be coming into the town they are looking at. I hope this is not what most people are looking for as a quality of life improvement.
 I wonder how many sunbelters realize what winter means in New Hampshire. If you are not a winter person, you may be moving to a living hell (New Hampshire has the highest alcohol consumption in the US). As the old Yankee saying goes, we have 10 months of winter, and two months of damn poor skiing.
I've seen it spitting snow in July - honest. How many of you know about things like roof rakes, mud season, black flies, window quilts, and 48" frost lines. Concord NH has one of the shortest growing seasons in the US, about 100 frost free days a year. Of course in the hinterlands it's colder yet. A solid week of minus 20 mornings is not uncommon, and a few years ago, our snow was high enough that our dogs were able to walk on the roof of our house. As for city life, broken hips are one of the most common serious injuries on icy sidewalks of Manchester. Sure NH is a beautiful state, but just realize what you are moving to before you sell your air conditioners and head on up. ;)
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jgmaynard

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2004, 04:46:08 pm »

Hey Doug:

Methinks you're painting a bleak picture. I've been here all my life, and I know I can grow far longer than 100 days a year, an hour from Concord. :) Really... That HAS to be a record from 1943 or something. ;)

And some winters are bad... Winter before last, we had 4' snow drifts in Keene for weeks. But 4-5 years ago, it didn't snow until February, and was gone 6 weeks later. So it changes a lot from year to year.

And I've met hundreds of FSP members, and there's not one that I don't believe can last the harshest winter for a real chance at Freedom. :)

JM



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Pat K

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Re:NH Tips
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2004, 05:27:03 pm »

Hell Doug if you think the alcohol consumption is
 high now just wait till us porc's all get there.


I doubt that their are any folks who hate cold and snow more than I. But millions of folks live in the cold north and so will we and we will do it in= HIGH STYLE.

Of course Doug we would appreciate any tips on roof rakes, mud flies, good beer etc that we should know about. Thanks in advance.
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