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Author Topic: Potential porcupine immigration  (Read 3165 times)

Tom Morris

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Potential porcupine immigration
« on: September 07, 2005, 06:09:07 am »

Hey all,

I'm very much interested in the Free State Project, and would actually seriously consider moving to NH.

Here's my situation. I'm currently a citizen of the United Kingdom, and a university student in London. The Free State attracts me, because it currently provides a far freer state than the UK, where micromanagement and government inefficiency are the expected norm.

In search of liberty, I'd be prepared to emigrate to the United States, though it would be a few years before that happens. My career plans centre on either qualification as a lawyer, or becoming an academic in my current discipline (philosophy).

If I was to choose the law as a profession, I'd have two choices - either qualify here in the UK, then find a way of transferring my qualification to the United States, or finish my degree here, then find a way of studying for access to the New Hampshire market. But, as far as I can see, American immigration rules currently list being professional qualification as one of the requirements for getting an immigration visa. This poses something of a dilemma. It costs lots of money to qualify here in Britain. Not nearly as much as in the States, but it's in the region of $30,000, once you've taken the academic and vocational training, and the living-on-virtually-nothing-during-on-the-job training. It seems something of a waste to qualify here in Britain, if I plan to hop over to NH after I've finished.

Other than this treadmill of qualifications that lead to the career I want, I've got no other committments - no wife or kids or mortgage or any of that stuff.

So, what to do? At what point is the best point to move to NH during this?

Are there any other FSP-ers, either moved or planning to, from Europe or other foriegn countries? It's something I'd like to seriously explore, for both economic and libertarian reasons. I feel less and less comfortable by the day in the UK, where liberty is always the first thing on the chopping block, where the 'unwritten constitution' is far easier to rip apart than the constitution of the United States.

Finally, if you've got any say over the immigration procedures, let us Brits in! Two centuries ago, Brits took it in their hands, along with other Europeans, to move to the United States in search of freedom. Some of those who are left behind, and haven't been taken in by political personality cults and the vain attractions of statism, still want that liberty.
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Equality 7-2521

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Re: Potential porcupine immigration
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2005, 08:10:17 am »

Couldn't you come to USA (NH) on a student visa of some sort to go to school? 

My wife is an attorney, and the laws are vastly different here just from state to state, so I'd think you may be better off to
get your education here and get your law degree in NH so that you learn NH laws. 

Plus during your time in school you'd have lots of time to look around for a place to live after graduation and make better plans. 

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"Taxes are the way people join hands to get good things done. That's the tradition of Minnesota." - Former MN Gov. Elmer L. Andersen

See Why I'm ready to move?

mvpel

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Re: Potential porcupine immigration
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2005, 08:37:24 am »

And plenty of time to find a green card sponsor to hire you.
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Tom Morris

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Re: Potential porcupine immigration
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2005, 10:04:05 am »

One solution I've found could be to do 4 more years in London. There's a course at my university which is two years of LL.B, followed by two years at Columbia. Four years in college gets you an LL.B and a J.D., so I can practice in Britain and in NH.

The thought of moving to the States is an exciting one. I heard about the FSP a while back and thought "that's idealistic, but impractical", but the more I think about it, the more practical it seems. Everything seems a lot, lot cheaper in the States. I was also reading of a couple who took advantage of the Investors immigration law to move to the States - they basically sold their house in Trowbridge, and with the money bought an equivalently sized house in Florida, and invested the remainder in a business in Seattle, Washington, as silent partners. They were getting a pretty sizeable return from their business, and kept far more of their money, since they weren't paying for so much of our nonsense.

Basically, the law they have is if you can invest $500k or $1m (depending on the state you invest in) in a business which will provide employment to 10 people, you're allowed to become a U.S. citizen.

That's a good retirement plan for foriegn libertarians, methinks, especially since England in terms of liberty is dying.
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mvpel

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Re: Potential porcupine immigration
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2005, 06:22:46 pm »

The sooner you come meet all of us, the more practical it will seem.

We're kicking butt right now through the NHLA, school boards, etc, with only 100 new arrivals.
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FreeBoB

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Re: Potential porcupine immigration
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2005, 07:02:35 pm »

"So, what to do? At what point is the best point to move to NH during this?"

Hello Tom,

Interesting question with an obvious answer.  NOW.  Now is the time.  Ask me in a week or 6 months, NOW.  Always now... 8)

BTW, there are 33 Participants in the United Kingdom.  There may be a few within spittin' distance of you!  Let me know if you're interested in starting a UK Yahoo Group or organizing them in some way!

Brian
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