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Author Topic: Montessori Schools in NH  (Read 12891 times)

sanuzis

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Montessori Schools in NH
« on: October 07, 2003, 10:19:26 am »

There are at least 3 Montessori schools listed on the NH state’s list of Non Public Schools.


http://www.ed.state.nh.us/NONPublicSchools/NONPUBLIC-03.pdf



http://www.bodhitreemontessori.com/bodhimain.htm


www.derymontessori.org


Montessori House of Children
monte@worldpath.net

ADDED from others:

www.greenvalleyschool.com

« Last Edit: October 10, 2003, 07:12:10 am by sanuzis »
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LeRuineur6

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2003, 10:58:46 am »

There are at least 3 Montessori schools listed on the NH state’s list of Non Public Schools.

http://www.ed.state.nh.us/NONPublicSchools/NONPUBLIC-03.pdf

Where did you find this link?   :o

It's amazing!  And so useful for the FSP-Charities group!  :)
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silverfish

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2003, 01:01:58 am »

Just because they use the name "Montessori" doesnt mean they are accredited by either of the 'big two' accrediting authorities for Montessori in this country.

AMI (Association Montessori International) is a world wide accrediting organization that was founded by Maria Montessori. It is "Traditional" (to the point of nearly being fundamentalist hehe). Materials used by AMI schools tend to include only the materials Maria Montessori and the AMI developed or new ones inspired by the originals. website http://www.montessori-ami.org  I couldnt find any AMI schools in New Hampshire, which could be good if anyone is looking to start an AMI certified school there!

AMS is the other accrediting organization. They are more progressive, incorporating more modern materials into lessons. Their website is www.amshq.com

I know more about AMI as the school my kids go to is an AMI school. My sisters kids go to an AMS school in Northern IL and it is pretty close to what my kids do, though all montessori schools are different. I almost feel trapped here because I like their school so much that I hate to consider moving them away from it, and not finding an equivilent school.

My advice on Montessori schools is 'do your homework' and study up on them. Observe classes, find out what montessori materials look like from one of the sites above, to see if the school is using them (also Nienhuis and Michael Olaf www.michaelolaf.com are suppliers of materials for you homeschoolers interesting in getting away from the shackles of textbooks).
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silverfish

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2003, 01:10:54 am »

i was looking around the web as I posted my last post and came across this montessori school: http://www.greenvalleyschool.com/

goes through middle school (jr high)...
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kittiemeow

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2003, 01:51:43 am »

Thank you so much for posting this.
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Ogre11

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2003, 11:33:09 am »

The only thing I don't like about that list?  The third word -- "Approved."  I hate the idea that the state has to approve a private school.

However, I'm wondering how you get on this list?  I've been searching various NH government sites to see what I can find, and I can find nothing.  It must be in the General Statues somewhere, but they are very difficult to read.  Does anyone know anything else about becoming an approved non-public school in NH?  I think I might like to do that...
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Karl

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2003, 12:15:48 pm »

The only thing I don't like about that list?  The third word -- "Approved."  I hate the idea that the state has to approve a private school.

However, I'm wondering how you get on this list?  I've been searching various NH government sites to see what I can find, and I can find nothing.  It must be in the General Statues somewhere, but they are very difficult to read.  Does anyone know anything else about becoming an approved non-public school in NH?  I think I might like to do that...

Here are the rules:

http://www.ed.state.nh.us/NONPublicSchools/non-publ.htm

Also, here's a complete list of Montessori schools, including those not "approved":

http://privateschool.about.com/blmsub6_montessori_nh.htm

Note that, should the educrats at the Board of Education get their way, they will require public school districts offer public kindergarten.  This will immediately impact many of the schools on the list above as well as other private schools that provide kindergarten.  I expect at least a couple to go out of business, and others will reduce enrollment significantly.

If you're in NH now, call your state representatives and tell them you oppose the proposed kindergarten mandate.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2003, 12:16:24 pm by Karl Beisel »
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Karl

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2003, 12:51:58 pm »

BTW, does anyone else think the state's use of the term "non-public" a bit biased and negative?  Its as if a "non-public" school is somehow less than a public one.  I'd like to see them use the word "independent" to describe private schools.

Maybe we should support legislation that would change all instances of "nonpublic schools" to "independent schools" in all statutes and administrative rules.
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Ogre11

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2003, 01:03:49 pm »

Holy crap.  I think I've just changed my mind about trying to start a private school in NH.  The rules for starting a school are over 70 pages long.  I know I'm preaching to the choir here, but can someone tell me why in the &^#&# the government needs 70 pages of regulations for a PRIVATE school?  I'm beyond words here.  Put me on the non-approved list!  Geez.  Give me some option here!  This is unreal.

If I didn't have a family to support, I think I'd start a private school in NH just to see if they'd actually put in me jail for providing education to youths without filing 100s of useless forms.  I can't believe there are actually private schools in NH at all with this list of requirements.

Ok, I'm going to vent now, so feel free to ignore me.  Some parts of the "law":

"(a) The standard school year shall be 180 days."

What?  Why?  I was planning on year-round school!  NH is a great place to continue school all summer -- hardly any need for AC!  Guess that option's out.

To even apply for a private school existance, you need to provide a letter of intent that must include parts a-s, with various sub-parts.  A few:

"c. The school program's philosophic or religious traditions;"

What?  Who cares?  Why on earth would the state care?  What's the wrong answer?  In other words, what religions can I answer here that will get me rejected?

"h. One copy of the school's curriculum, which may be accomplished by providing a list of courses and their descriptions;"

Can you say, "none-ya?"  I wonder if I could get by with "Course A: A course about different things.; Course B: A course about some other things."

"i. A brief description of the school's supporting services, including but not limited to:
1. Health;
2. Guidance;
3. Library services;
4. Food services; and
5. Referral services;"


Hello, I wanted a school, not a community resource center.

"j. A brief statement indicating how the school complies with each of the statutory requirements of nonpublic schools, stated in RSA 189:11, RSA 189:17, RSA 189:19, RSA 189:20, RSA 189:21, RSA 193:31, and RSA 198:20-a;

k. A brief statement identifying those practices, if any, adopted by the school in carrying out the intent of RSA 189:10, RSA 189:49, RSA 191:1, RSA 191:2, RSA 191:3, RSA 191:4, RSA 193:1-a, and RSA 200:33;"


Oops.  I missed those laws.  I guess I need to add to the 70 pages of requirements that must be adhered to.

"m. A brief biographical sketch of each staff member including:
1. Formal education;
2. Professional experience; and
3. Special life experiences that qualify the staff member to carry out the school's educational purposes and objectives and to carry out assigned responsibilities;"


This is clearly, 100% none of the business of the state.  There is absolutely no possible reason that can be given to me that will give any logical support to requesting this information.  Oh wait.  I forgot: "For the children."

"q. A description of the procedure for development of the school's budget and operating statement indicating whether the school provides a financial statement of its financial operations;"

Sure, this is valid for a public school, you have to know where the taxpayer money is spent.  Its not your damn money, NH, so bite me.  I'm not telling you how I'm getting my money.

And believe it or not, that's just to APPLY, and for attendance approvals.  That's only 1/3 of the first 70 pages of laws.  There's pages more of reports to be filed.  Oh, and a whole host of other requirements to be approved for "program purposes.":

"The nonpublic school shall provide the following information...A copy of the school's current approved operating budget and operating statement, which shall clearly demonstrate the availability of reSources to support the program as described above"

Again, they want to see exactly how much money you're spending, where you're spending it, what you're spending it on, and where it came from.  How the heck is this related to education in any way, shape or form?  How can any private school function in NH?  I guess since all this is provided to the state, I can go get the operating budget of any current private school, so I can see how much they cost, how much they pay out, and how they operate so I can effectively compete.  What a load.

"Upon receipt of the required written materials and reports from schools seeking initial program approval, the state department of education shall schedule a visitation to the school by a 3-member team..."

Of course.  I don't think I need to comment on this intimidation.

It goes on and on, and I'm starting to get ill.  Of course, in the details, we see the reason for all this B.S.:

"Nonpublic schools, AA, AP, or SP shall be eligible to participate in state and federally funded programs, including but not limited to:
(1) Child benefit services;
(2) Dual enrollment programs;
(3) Driver education reimbursement;
(4) Child nutrition programs;
(5) Federal education programs; and
(6) Vocational rehabilitation."


Now we see the reason for the BS.  I don't want the government money, I just want to have a private school!  Are all new businesses in NH subject to such outright hostility?

I wonder what the penalty is for operating a school without a licence?  I hope I can get a jury trial...
« Last Edit: November 20, 2003, 01:07:15 pm by Ogre11 »
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Karl

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2003, 01:35:00 pm »

Maybe this is why only 3 Montessori schools out of 20 are "approved" by the State.

That would mean that compliance with Ed 400 is optional.  I can't see anything in the rule itself that suggests it is mandatory.  It uses tricky language to suggest that it is required by saying things like "all approved schools must comply."
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Ogre11

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2003, 07:26:36 am »

Hmm...if there were only a way to get a straight answer on that one.  Usually when I've contacted other private schools, they don't want to answer because they don't want competition.  No one in the education department will give a straight answer, because they don't want competition either.  I really don't like the idea of having to pay a lawyer a few thousand dollars just to find out what I have to do legally, but there may be no other option.  To me, this is the biggest problem with too large a government.  If I want to start a business (and I do), it shouldn't require a lawyer to interpret the law for me!
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Karl

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #11 on: November 21, 2003, 09:01:13 am »

Ogre, you'll definitely want to consult a lawyer on the matter.  According to RSA 193:1, children over the age of 6 are required to attend either a public or "approved" non-public school.  Your school will have to comply.

The 15 or so "unapproved" Montessori schools may have only pre-school and kindergarten programs, for children below the age of 6.

I'm sorry that the regulations are so difficult.  But there is reason to be hopeful: one of Governor Benson's priorities is to expand school choice.  With our help, many of these regulations could be relaxed in the coming years.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2003, 09:02:01 am by Karl Beisel »
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Ogre11

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2003, 11:21:42 am »

Isn't that the typical double-standard government-speak:  You don't have to get your school approved, if you don't want to, so we're not forcing you to go through this process.  Of course, we're also requiring that all residents can only send their students to approved schools.

So I can make a school that's not approved, its just that no one will be permitted to go there.  Nice.  I guess its time to make some serious attempts at some contacts in legislative areas of NH.  Perhaps if I show up with venture capitalist money and plans, with conditions of moving only when the laws will let me bring my money, their plans for improvement will quickly speed up.

I'll let everyone know here as these plans move forward.  Now, where to find venture capitalists who want to support private schools...
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Dawn

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2003, 07:37:12 pm »

The regulations surrrounding private schools are disgusting. But as already noted, this is for "approved" schools. In CT, I know that we have non-approved schools. I'm not sure exactly what they have to do to be considered a school and for the diploma's to mean something.

There is another way around this. In MA, I know of a school that is non-approved and they help the parents set their children up as homeschoolers. So, the parents are technically responsible for the education of their own children, but the school helps them meet the requirements.
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thewaka

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Re:Montessori Schools in NH
« Reply #14 on: November 23, 2003, 11:04:04 am »

I'm sorry that the regulations are so difficult.  But there is reason to be hopeful: one of Governor Benson's priorities is to expand school choice.  With our help, many of these regulations could be relaxed in the coming years.

Karl, do you have a link to Gov Benson's proposals? When I hear "school choice," I don't think less legislation but more. Are his proposals moving things in the right direction or going to make it harder to get rid of compulsory education?

Diana
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