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Author Topic: NH HSing laws  (Read 10488 times)

sopwith21

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Re:NH HSing laws
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2003, 10:12:58 am »

Huh? Are you responding to rodschmidt who mentions the 4th and 5th amendments? If not, please explain because I don't understand the reference otherwise.


Oops. You must be right. Sorry.

Well, in PA, as in NH, the yearly evaluator is chosen by the parents, though there are certain requirements to be met. In PA, the school districts have to approve evaluators first. Doesn't seem to be the case in NH, which is better. Even here, there are friendly-to-homeschooling evaluators. I am sure finding them in NH is not a problem.

True... that is helpful. However, any "evaluator" must be approved by the state; which means they are state indoctrinated and state licensed.

The problem with evaluators is that they use a different barometer for success. They forget that if we wanted them to have the same education as everyone else, we'd just put them in a state school and forget about it.

Also, we face the problem of using an evaluator who is not competent to perform an evaluation. If my kids are three grade levels ahead of theirs, its a little ridiculous to assume that they're capable of criticizing our teaching methods. We should be evaluating them.

Thanks for the informative post. I was hoping for better news from NH, but I guess it could be worse.
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sopwith21

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Re:NH HSing laws
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2003, 10:21:42 am »

Frankly, I don't find the NH requirements too bad.

I find them disastrous.

But the I'm coming from a state that has no requirements, approval, evaluations or state tracking whatsoever. The state has no need to even know that we're home schooling.

I do, however, have my eye on the future changes we can enact and that is what I hang my hopes on - not the short run restrictiveness.  NH is the state we've chosen and what is going to make it succeed as Free State is getting all of us there actively pushing for change!

Yes, but its difficult to go from a much more free state to a more restrictive state and convince yourself that its in the name of freedom. Especially when our kids will likely have already graduated before we can make any impact on the system. The future changes will be great for someone else's kids, but too late to help mine.

I keep hearing that NH was the best possible choice for FSP, but every time I try to research it and give it a chance, I'm more disappointed than I was to start with.
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