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Author Topic: New Hampshire Facts  (Read 9332 times)

rodschmidt

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New Hampshire Facts
« on: October 02, 2003, 02:30:12 pm »

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/33000.html
New Hampshire QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

http://www.census.gov/datamap/www/33txt.html
New Hampshire County Profiles from the US Census Bureau

http://www.state.nh.us/nhinfo/ffcounties.html
The NH Almanac

http://www.nhcounties.org/
New Hampshire Association of Counties

http://www.nhdeeds.com/
Registry of Deeds

http://www.ohwy.com/nh/n/nhcounty.htm
New Hampshire Counties

http://www.ohwy.com/nh/n/nhcity.htm
New Hampshire Cities and Towns

http://www.vitalrec.com/nhcounties.html
Vital Records Information

http://www.nhlinks.com/cr.htm
NH Links

http://www.gencircles.com/clubs/list/usa/nh
NH Genealogy Clubs (county by county)

http://www.50states.com/newhamps.htm
Basic Facts (incl. White & Yellow Pages)

http://www.newhampshire.com/pages/counties.cfm
Counties, Population, Merchants

http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/state.cfm&state.cfm
National Association of Counties
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rodschmidt

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New Hampshire Home Schooling Law
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2003, 03:59:40 pm »

New Hampshire Home Schooling Law
http://www.hslda.org/laws/default.asp?State=NH
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mark

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2003, 04:48:23 pm »

http://www.state.nh.us/sos/vote.htm
HOW TO REGISTER TO VOTE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE



 ;)
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rhull

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2003, 08:03:42 pm »

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"The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws" -- Tacitus, Roman senator and historian (A.D. c.56- c.115)

rodschmidt

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New Hampshire Revised Statutes
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2003, 12:21:06 am »

http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/indexes/default.html
New Hampshire Revised Statutes

http://www.labor.state.nh.us/administrative_rules.asp
New Hampshire Administrative Rules

http://www.courts.state.nh.us/rules/admn/
NEW HAMPSHIRE SUPERIOR COURT ADMINISTRATIVE RULES

http://www.lexisone.com/legalresearch/legalguide/states/new_hampshire.htm
Lexis One Legal Web Site Directory  
State Resource Center > New Hampshire
 
 
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rodschmidt

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County Government Personnel
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2003, 12:44:26 am »

http://www.belknapcounty.org/
sheriff dcollis@co.belknap.nh.us
county attorney lnoether@co.belknap.nh.us
registrar of deeds rnormandin@nhdeeds.com
human services cschonfeld@co.belknap.nh.us
nursing home administrator kpainter@co.belknap.nh.us
corrections department jpanarello@co.belknap.nh.us

http://www.co.cheshire.nh.us/
county commissioners
   klmfrm@cheshire.net
   zerba@cheshire.net
   sistarej@town.jaffrey.nh.us
executive assistant to the commissioners
   twarren@co.cheshire.nh.us
finance director strombly@co.cheshire.nh.us
medicare billing coordinator bcarlin@co.cheshire.nh.us
medicaid and self-pay billing coordinator mdurling@co.cheshire.nh.us
accounts payable pputnam@co.cheshire.nh.us
corrections
   superintendent rvanwickler@co.cheshire.nh.us
   director of operations shagar@co.cheshire.nh.us
   
http://www.hillsboroughcountynh.org/

merrimack county
http://www.ci.concord.nh.us/defaulto.asp?url=/govmnt/county/default.asp
city of concord cityclerk@ci.concord.nh.us

http://co.rockingham.nh.us/
The City of Portsmouth, New Hampshire (in Rockingham County) has most recently been identified by Money Magazine as the fifth best place to live in the United States.

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Top Dollar

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2003, 01:45:50 pm »

National Atlas Online:

http://nationalatlas.gov/natlas/NatlasStart.asp

Add layers in right frame to see population, topography, land use, land cover, etc.
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U.S. Constitution Text:  http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.text.html
U.S. Founding Documents:  http://www.constitution.org/cs_found.htm

George Phillies

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2003, 09:21:36 am »

I am not sure of a source, but for a large number of recruits you need some references on 'living in nonurban America'. explaining a few topics.
There are not objections to the free state, but they are cultural issues that need to be overcome so that people will be able to live successfully under conditions not similar to those under which they have lived in the past.

"what is a septic tank?"

"What is a perc (percolation) test?"

"What is a well?  You mean it's not a hole in the ground witha  wind-up bucket? What do you mean there is no town water?"

"What do you mean there is no natural gas service?'

"What is LPG?'"

"What is a 'town dump'?"

"Where are the sidewalks?"

"Where is the nearest bus stop?" ;D

"What do you mean, the wild animals will attack the cat?  Why aren't the moose all in zoos?" :o

Note that many towns in fairly urban Massachusetts are rural by these standards though the lack of natural gas service is due to government misregulation.

cathleeninsc

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2003, 11:23:33 am »

Now that you have scared me, where are the answers?

Cathleen in SC
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Ogre11

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #9 on: November 04, 2003, 12:50:14 pm »

Ok, raised all up and down the East Coast, currently living in NC, but anxiously searching for a job in NH, I'll give it a shot:

"what is a septic tank?"

septic tank: n. A sewage-disposal tank in which a continuous flow of waste material is decomposed by anaerobic bacteria.  In many rural places when you flush your toilet, it does not flow through the pipes and into a waste water treatment facility.  Instead, there is a large tank buried underground in your yard where the waste generously feeds bacteria.  The by-products are used to fertilize your grass, so you get a nice spot of very healthy grass.  Everything works great -- until it breaks.  Working and cleaning these things is, quite obviously, really nasty.  Its been awhile since I've had one, but as I recall, there's certain maintenance that needs to be done on a semi-regular basis (every so many years?).

"What is a perc (percolation) test?"

You remember that septic tank mentioned above?  Well, it has output.  The "cleaned" water needs to slowly seep out into the ground.  Before you can do that, you need to test the ground to see if it is capable of supporting such seepage.  That's a percolation test.  Want to see how to do one?  Try here: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD0583.html

"What is a well?  You mean it's not a hole in the ground witha  wind-up bucket? What do you mean there is no town water?"

A well is where you get your water when there is no town water (or no town!).  The wind-up bucket works OK -- until you want water under pressure, or water in the winter.  You need a pump and a sealed system.

"What do you mean there is no natural gas service?"

This means that there is no natural gas service.  :)  In many rural places, this option simply isn't there.  Power your stuff some other way.  Some places in NH individuals have large oil tanks that get filled whenever they are needed.  See LPG.

"What is LPG?"

No, its not long-playing anything (am I showing my age?).  From the World LP Gas Association (http://www.worldlpg.com):
Quote
LP Gas (or LPG) stands for “Liquefied Petroleum Gas”. It is the term widely used to describe a family of light hydrocarbons called “gas liquids”. The most prominent members of this family are propane (C3H8) and butane (C4H10). Other members of the LP Gas family are ethane and pentane. These latter fuels have their own distinctive markets and are not further discussed here.
For what, now?  Again, from World LP Gas Assoc:
Quote
LP Gas has literally thousands of uses around the home, on the farm, in commercial business, in industry and transportation. Wherever heat, light or power is required, LP Gas can be used.


"What is a 'town dump'?"

Its where you dump stuff.  Whatever stuff you don't want.  You will find in most rural areas if you place things by the road at the end of your driveway, they will stay there.  Some areas have curbside pickup, but not all.  If you live somewhere that doesn't, you take out your own trash.  This is a good thing, as you don't have to pay taxes for garbage-man salaries.

"Where are the sidewalks?"

Somewhere else.  The houses are not so close together that it matters, nor are the street so populated that people would use them, anyway.  They're not needed, so valuable tax money is not spent in building them!

"Where is the nearest bus stop?"

Depending on where you are in NH, it will be Boston, Burlington, or Canada.  Let's hear it for non-taxpayer subsidized transportation!

"What do you mean, the wild animals will attack the cat?  Why aren't the moose all in zoos?"

What's a zoo?  ;)  Aren't all animals wild, by definition?  Keep your house cat indoors, or it may be eaten.  Just another reason to ensure easy-access to firearms, eh?
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Mike Lorrey

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2003, 04:04:55 pm »

"What is a perc (percolation) test?"

You remember that septic tank mentioned above?  Well, it has output.  The "cleaned" water needs to slowly seep out into the ground.  Before you can do that, you need to test the ground to see if it is capable of supporting such seepage.  That's a percolation test.  Want to see how to do one?  Try here: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD0583.html

Essentially, a perc test is you dig a 6 foot deep hole in the ground where you want your septic tank and leach field (the area of your yard where you'll bury a network of PVC piping to leach your effluent into the yard evenly). If the hole fills up with water to within x many inches of the surface (not sure of the exact amount, its been a while), then you can't put your tank or field there. If you are sited in a low lying area completely, with no good perc test sites, you may have to build a field that is elevated, i.e. dump a lot of fill in the yard and level it so the top is elevated x inches from the regular surface (depending on how your perc test came out)

Quote

"What is a well?  You mean it's not a hole in the ground witha  wind-up bucket? What do you mean there is no town water?"

A well is where you get your water when there is no town water (or no town!).  The wind-up bucket works OK -- until you want water under pressure, or water in the winter.  You need a pump and a sealed system.

Depends. If you keep the well covered when not in use, and the water level is more than 6-10 feet down, it will not freeze.

Quote
"What do you mean there is no natural gas service?"

This means that there is no natural gas service.  :)  In many rural places, this option simply isn't there.  Power your stuff some other way.  Some places in NH individuals have large oil tanks that get filled whenever they are needed.  See LPG.

"What is LPG?"

No, its not long-playing anything (am I showing my age?).  From the World LP Gas Association (http://www.worldlpg.com):
Quote
LP Gas (or LPG) stands for “Liquefied Petroleum Gas”. It is the term widely used to describe a family of light hydrocarbons called “gas liquids”. The most prominent members of this family are propane (C3H8) and butane (C4H10). Other members of the LP Gas family are ethane and pentane. These latter fuels have their own distinctive markets and are not further discussed here.
For what, now?  Again, from World LP Gas Assoc:
Quote
LP Gas has literally thousands of uses around the home, on the farm, in commercial business, in industry and transportation. Wherever heat, light or power is required, LP Gas can be used.


As said in "King of the Hill": "Propane and propane products". Mention "Natural Gas" to someone in rural NH, they're likely to step away a few feet and reply "Yep, ah've had chili like thet before..."

In my family's hunting cabin, we use propane for: light, heat, cooking, water heating, and refrigerating (LP fridges are common in campers as well).

Quote

"What is a 'town dump'?"

Its where you dump stuff.  Whatever stuff you don't want.  You will find in most rural areas if you place things by the road at the end of your driveway, they will stay there.  Some areas have curbside pickup, but not all.  If you live somewhere that doesn't, you take out your own trash.  This is a good thing, as you don't have to pay taxes for garbage-man salaries.

Even the City of Lebanon has no government curbside pickup. You can contract with a company to do it, but many people save money by taking their trash to the dump themselves. You can buy tickets and a permit to the city dump at the city hall or city library (you gotta provide proof of residency in the city or a neighboring town that has contracted access for its residents). Tickets are a buck each, and four full barrels of garbage costs two tickets, generally.

You bring your recyclables along with you and sort them at the dump. Recycled garbage doesn't cost you anything.

Quote

"Where are the sidewalks?"

Somewhere else.  The houses are not so close together that it matters, nor are the street so populated that people would use them, anyway.  They're not needed, so valuable tax money is not spent in building them!

Though many roads of higher traffic do get wide shoulders built on them, so they function as un-elevated sidwalks.

Quote

"Where is the nearest bus stop?"

Depending on where you are in NH, it will be Boston, Burlington, or Canada.  Let's hear it for non-taxpayer subsidized transportation!

Not necessarily. Manchester has an extensive bus system, and the Lebanon/Hanover area has a private company called Advanced Transit that operates routes throughout the Upper Valley, some of which are paid for by the town government to provide free transit to people.

Quote

"What do you mean, the wild animals will attack the cat?  Why aren't the moose all in zoos?"

What's a zoo?  ;)  Aren't all animals wild, by definition?  Keep your house cat indoors, or it may be eaten.  Just another reason to ensure easy-access to firearms, eh?

My parents live in a planned community in Grantham called Eastman. It covers over 1/3 of the township, as well as part of Enfield and Springfield. It's concept is homes in the woods. Most houses have little or no grass yards. Wild animals abound. A friend who lives about 1/4 mile away shot a bear on his back porch one morning with his Uzi when it tried to break into his home. Foxes, coyote, bobcat, and fisher cat all are common predatory animals in this area. Not only will they eat your cat, but any pretty little dogs you have too. Most people in rural areas keep larger dogs like labs, shepherds, etc. Cats are kept in doors unless they are of the barn cat variety.

Barn cats are an interesting breed. They tend to grow very big (15-30 lb is not uncommon), frequently with the multi-paw birth defect. Some can be friendly, but their job in life is essentially to keep the barn de-moused, de-ratted, de-pigeoned, and deter foxes, raccoons, badgers, skunks, and other small hostile mammals from pestering the chickens, ducks, turkeys, rabbits, or other domestics. Having a barn is a prerequisite to having a barn cat.
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mark

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Re:New Hampshire Facts
« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2003, 07:11:02 am »

"What is a perc (percolation) test?"

You remember that septic tank mentioned above?  Well, it has output.  The "cleaned" water needs to slowly seep out into the ground.  Before you can do that, you need to test the ground to see if it is capable of supporting such seepage.  That's a percolation test.  Want to see how to do one?  Try here: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD0583.html

Essentially, a perc test is you dig a 6 foot deep hole in the ground where you want your septic tank and leach field (the area of your yard where you'll bury a network of PVC piping to leach your effluent into the yard evenly). If the hole fills up with water to within x many inches of the surface (not sure of the exact amount, its been a while), then you can't put your tank or field there. If you are sited in a low lying area completely, with no good perc test sites, you may have to build a field that is elevated, i.e. dump a lot of fill in the yard and level it so the top is elevated x inches from the regular surface (depending on how your perc test came out)

Quote

"What is a well?  You mean it's not a hole in the ground witha  wind-up bucket? What do you mean there is no town water?"

A well is where you get your water when there is no town water (or no town!).  The wind-up bucket works OK -- until you want water under pressure, or water in the winter.  You need a pump and a sealed system.

Depends. If you keep the well covered when not in use, and the water level is more than 6-10 feet down, it will not freeze.



This is a perfect opportunity for Justin aka rdeacon to sing the praises of an Earthship's graywater system.  ;D

Quote
Quote
"What is a 'town dump'?"

Its where you dump stuff.  Whatever stuff you don't want.  You will find in most rural areas if you place things by the road at the end of your driveway, they will stay there.  Some areas have curbside pickup, but not all.  If you live somewhere that doesn't, you take out your own trash.  This is a good thing, as you don't have to pay taxes for garbage-man salaries.

Even the City of Lebanon has no government curbside pickup. You can contract with a company to do it, but many people save money by taking their trash to the dump themselves. You can buy tickets and a permit to the city dump at the city hall or city library (you gotta provide proof of residency in the city or a neighboring town that has contracted access for its residents). Tickets are a buck each, and four full barrels of garbage costs two tickets, generally.

You bring your recyclables along with you and sort them at the dump. Recycled garbage doesn't cost you anything.


And Earthship garden composting too!  ;)


I bet experiencing the flow of waste first hand gives rural Hampshirites a better and more natural respect for conservation efforts.  ;)
« Last Edit: November 05, 2003, 07:13:29 am by mark »
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