Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Questions from a prospective member  (Read 4456 times)

regmail

  • Guest
Questions from a prospective member
« on: October 03, 2003, 08:08:06 am »

Hi all!

I'm considering joining the group and making the move to NH.  I'd like to get feedback on a few ideas.  Thanks in advance for any responses.

1. How would the military and police be funded?  What else do you see as essential government functions?

2. If we have a system to deal with force and fraud (e.g., an arbitrator or court system), how would it be funded?  Who would make the decisions and how would they be selected?

3. Let's say I am against drugs and abortion on a personal level.  I do not want to push my opinions on others and would "live and let live."  However, I have a problem with sending any money to pay for the limited government that would be necessary (i.e., police, defense, etc.) for individuals with whom I don't share morals and values.  How would this be handled?

4.  How would legal drugs be handled?  Would they be available to anyone?  Could they be bought and sold anywhere?  Would there be a legal age, such as there is currently with alcohol?

Thanks again!
Logged

Summerlin

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 108
  • Student.
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2003, 08:13:34 am »

"Military"?

There is no military presence in New Hampshire.  Federal Taxes of all citizens in all states pay for the US Military.
Logged

Karl

  • Guest
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2003, 08:21:29 am »

Hi regmail!  Welcome to the forum.  I'll try to answer your questions.

1. How would the military and police be funded?  What else do you see as essential government functions?

National defense is Federal function; the free state is unlikely to address the issue of defense funding, except of course through our elected representatives in Congress.  There are, however, state defense functions, i.e. the National Guard.  I've not seen much discussion on this matter, perhaps someone else can elaborate.

Quote
2. If we have a system to deal with force and fraud (e.g., an arbitrator or court system), how would it be funded?  Who would make the decisions and how would they be selected?

Most of us believe that the judicial system is a vital and legitimate function of government.  It is likely to remain largely unchanged, and continue to be funded with taxes.  There are probably less intrusive, alternative methods of funding that should be considered.

Quote
3. Let's say I am against drugs and abortion on a personal level.  I do not want to push my opinions on others and would "live and let live."  However, I have a problem with sending any money to pay for the limited government that would be necessary (i.e., police, defense, etc.) for individuals with whom I don't share morals and values.  How would this be handled?

This is a problem with forced taxation.  The government inevitably uses the money for programs without someone's consent.  Ideally, there would be no forced taxation.  However, a zero-tax society would be far down the road.  For the forseeable future, we're likely to shoot toward minimal taxation with decisions made by elected representatives.

Quote
4.  How would legal drugs be handled?  Would they be available to anyone?  Could they be bought and sold anywhere?  Would there be a legal age, such as there is currently with alcohol?

Drugs of any kind should be available to any adult (over the age of 18), so long as they are properly labelled.

Hope this helps!
« Last Edit: October 03, 2003, 08:23:51 am by Karl Beisel »
Logged

Justin

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 686
  • So... these are going to be my neighbors?!
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2003, 11:31:43 am »

1. How would the military and police be funded?  What else do you see as essential government functions?

National defense is Federal function; the free state is unlikely to address the issue of defense funding, except of course through our elected representatives in Congress.  There are, however, state defense functions, i.e. the National Guard.  I've not seen much discussion on this matter, perhaps someone else can elaborate.

Just to clarify, the National Guard is a Federal creation that allows the state governor to use them in emergency cases.  The governor cannot refuse to send its citizens into a foreign war.

It would be interesting to have a state militia (though that word is now tainted) that provides the same functions of the National Guard but is truly under state control. Perhaps with such a system the Feds might be more reluctant to engage in foreign expeditions if the states' governors can refuse to send their militia along.
Logged
Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest. - Diderot

NuclearDruid

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 147
  • TANSTAAFL
    • The Colonization Too Project
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2003, 12:29:00 pm »

1. How would the military and police be funded?  What else do you see as essential government functions?

National defense is Federal function; the free state is unlikely to address the issue of defense funding, except of course through our elected representatives in Congress.  There are, however, state defense functions, i.e. the National Guard.  I've not seen much discussion on this matter, perhaps someone else can elaborate.

Just to clarify, the National Guard is a Federal creation that allows the state governor to use them in emergency cases.  The governor cannot refuse to send its citizens into a foreign war.

It would be interesting to have a state militia (though that word is now tainted) that provides the same functions of the National Guard but is truly under state control. Perhaps with such a system the Feds might be more reluctant to engage in foreign expeditions if the states' governors can refuse to send their militia along.

Chapter 111 of the NH Statues authorizes a State Guard that is seperate from the National Guard. This is more regulated than the unorganized militia but does not fall under the control of the NG and cannot operate outside the state (with one exception) and is not authorized for operating outside the U.S. at all.
Logged
"Responsibility is a unique concept. It can only reside and inhere in a single individual. You may share it with others, but your portion is not diminished. You may delegate it, but it is still with you. You may disclaim it, but you cannot divest yourself of it." - Admiral Hyman Rickover

Justin

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 686
  • So... these are going to be my neighbors?!
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2003, 01:33:59 pm »

Very cool.  The more I learn about NH, the more I like it.
Logged
Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest. - Diderot

thewaka

  • FSP Member
  • FSP Participant
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 263
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2003, 04:16:27 pm »

3. Let's say I am against drugs and abortion on a personal level.  I do not want to push my opinions on others and would "live and let live."  However, I have a problem with sending any money to pay for the limited government that would be necessary (i.e., police, defense, etc.) for individuals with whom I don't share morals and values.  How would this be handled?

I am confused by this question. Very few share the same morals and values yet we all share the government (little as I hope that one day to be). As long as everything is enforced equally, what is the problem? Are you concerned you will be forced to pay for abortions? Or drugs? Or rehab? Please, more info is needed.

Diana
Logged

SteveA

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2905
  • Freedom - Are you man enough to handle it?
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2003, 04:52:26 am »

As usual Karl beat me to the post and as usual I agree with him on everything except a possible improvement.

Quote
3. Let's say I am against drugs and abortion on a personal level.  I do not want to push my opinions on others and would "live and let live."  However, I have a problem with sending any money to pay for the limited government that would be necessary (i.e., police, defense, etc.) for individuals with whom I don't share morals and values.  How would this be handled?

At the state level there should be minimal laws that protect life, liberty and property against force and fraud but specific laws and enforcement can be implemented at a lower county or city level.

Taxes paid to the state for statewide enforcement would go to state functions and additional local law enforcement could be funded locally.

Quote
4.  How would legal drugs be handled?  Would they be available to anyone?  Could they be bought and sold anywhere?  Would there be a legal age, such as there is currently with alcohol?

Yes, we currently don't allow minors to vote, drive, give consent for some actions or contractual agreements because they cannot be assumed to have an adequate understanding or foresight of the consequences of those actions.  An adult promoting a minor into possibly harmful actions should be held accountable for any consequences.  With regard to a libertarian view on drugs I consider it to be a fraudulent threat against life or liberty.  I have a conservative bent :) but believe most the FSP would agree with me.  Drugs and minors shouldn't be mixed IMO.

Legalizing drugs is the toughest issue here for me but I've heard the flip sides of the arguments and agree that our current "war on drugs" has a high cost in many ways and I've personally seen more abuse of legal drugs than illegal drugs and if someone is not causing any problems for the community then it would be almost cruel to haul someone off to prison for it.  If any drug laws remained (other than protecting minors) they should be against the manufacture and sale of drugs.  Also, for those who need help we can focus more on rehabilitation by family, friends or private organizations than the prison system (unless of course other criminal actions were involved).

I've heard of many cases where the "war on drugs" was used as an excuse to harass or prosecute someone who had done little to deserve such attention and we need to focus a lot less on relying on government institutions to take "care of us". ;)

Possibly the best solution (IMO) is to drop many of the state laws down to local governments and let communities see what works.  This could apply to a wide range of issues and allows individuals greater say in what they desire to see in government.  This has a strong constitutional correlation with a small federal government and strong states rights which allows for much evolution and competition between differing forms of government.  Well, that's one of my pet projects here :)

(I'll patiently await Zacks rebuttal :D)

BTW, if you have any ideas or suggestions, regmail, chime in.  We won't pass up any good ideas!
Logged
"Fruitless, born a thousand times, lies barren.  Unguided inspiration, yields random motion, circumscribed in destination, going nowhere.  Guidance uninspired, always true in facing, stands immobile.  But fixed upon that destination firmly and with inspiration lofted; beget your dreams."

Morpheus

  • Guest
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2003, 11:26:21 am »

Quote
Also, for those who need help


As long as it is PRIVATE. I refuse to have my money taken through taxation so that some cretinous, irresponsible crackwhore can receive assistance. To Hell with the Greens...

Quote
it would be almost cruel to haul someone off to prison for it.

Remove 'almost' and I agree with you wholeheartedly.

As regards the Drug War at large, the Criminal Warfare of the 1920's was CAUSED by the ALCHOHOLIC PROHIBITION. It gave rise to the likes of Al Capone and the Mafia, among other orders. The repealing of the Amendment was one of the wisest courses of action that the State has ever taken. Not to mention one of the few.
End Prohibition, and the Criminal Warfare will cease. If a drug such as, say, Aspirin, were to be prohbited, what do you think would happen? I can guarantee you that *I* would be HEAVILY involved in that Market; I've headaches to attend to, and John Ashcroft {or whatever cretin that would be in power} could kiss my &%$&#%* ass.

As regards the Governmental subsidizing of drugs {I've already covered that}, abortion, etc etc, I am in complete agreement with you, regmail. Personally, I am adamently Pro-Abortion- I believe that a woman, as anyone else, has the Right to do with her body as she shall- but I refuse to see it subsidized. Besides, the State-endorsement of it, as I see it, is one of the- if not THE- primary reason{s} as to why there are so many abortions as there are. Many, particularly teenagers, who engage in sexual intercourse are convinced of the fact that if they &$%* up {pun intended} that the State shall kiss them and make them feel better- and it *DOES*! It fosters irresponsibility, and it drains money that could actually be invested into IMPORTANT programming, such as Law Enforcement, the Court System and the Military {so that the Life, Liberty, and Property of the Citizenry can be protected from Force, Fraud, and Theft, both here and abroad; the protection of freedom, indeed}.

As to the actual funding of Government, I shall speak for myself: I am a Minarchist. More specifically, I am a Constitutional Libertarian Minarcho-Republican {afterall, this nation IS founded upon a Constitutional Republic, and NOT a Democracy as the herd would care to believe}. As such, as unfortunate as I do find it to be, I believe that SOME level of Taxation is absolutely neccessary. Just enough so as to ensure that the L-L-P of the Citizenry could be properly protected from F-F-T by domestic and foreign threats, and so that business such as Contracting and the like would have a proper framework from which to operate within. Beyond this, I would support the administration of Roads and the like by Government quite probably, but such as this would not require Taxation; User Fees would work very nicely, indeed.
Logged

LeopardPM

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2248
Re:Questions from a prospective member
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2003, 03:53:57 am »

oh, Morpheus, go head, make the leap... privatize the roads!  It will do ya good!

michael
Logged
nothing to say...
Pages: [1]   Go Up