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Author Topic: State Climates Report  (Read 44522 times)

Robert H.

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2002, 04:50:20 am »

Here are three links that can tell you just about anything you'd want to know about climate trends in the continental forty-eight states (complete with color maps):

NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration):

http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2002/sep/nattemp.html

NASA:

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NasaNews/2002/200204088344.html

Another temperature zone map:

http://www.tytyga.com/zonemap.html

mtPete

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #31 on: December 20, 2002, 01:21:35 am »

It's not that isolation=freedom necessarily equals freedom. Its just that where there are more people, they tend to like to take away your rights. Where there are more people, things are more crowded, and more expensive.

We just want to play cowboys? I am one, I don't play one.

"It's hard to knock on doors when everyone lives 40 acres apart."

Do you honestly believe that? Many of the people out west live in towns and cities just like everyone else in the nation. Those that do live in the country are miles apart, not 40 acres apart. But the folks that live in the country are the freedom loving type, you won't need to go door to door out there.

And contrary to popular belief most of us work within minutes of where we work. You don't have to look out of state or in big cities to find work. Out in the rural areas we usually don't commute very far. Long commutes are more found near larger cities where people work in the city but live out in the suburbs. Urban sprawl is practically unheard of out in the rural western states.

Whether we choose an Eastern state or a Western state, I don't care, liberty is more important than geography. But don't discount the West and we won't discount the east.
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mtPete

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #32 on: December 20, 2002, 01:48:35 am »

By no means are Billings and Missoula (though they be two of the larger cities) very representative of Montana. Also, be careful of reading too much into this years weather. In MT for example, we havn't a really good snowy winter in better than 6 years. And we just finnished our 4th consecutive year of droubt.

Also remember 'normal' weather is just the average of the extremes. For example, my father tells the story of when he was growing up one year he went out and played in the dirt with his new toys after christmas. The next year there were snowdrifts over the top of the fenceposts. This year pretty much the whole of the Northern Great Plains is snowless, and its almost Christmas.


As much as disregarding all climate concerns would be nice, it is not an option for everyone.  For those who have bad cases of asthma, or arthritis, or have suffered an injury, the cold and/or humidity can be an enormous burden.

- Chip Spangler

You know, I keep hearing this argument. But there is a high percentage of elderly in the western states (the young'ins all move out) and they all do just fine in the winter. Besides, the fresh air will do ya good.
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Robert H.

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #33 on: December 20, 2002, 01:50:06 am »

Mt. Pete,

Thank you for your observations here.  

Advocating a western state does not equal wanting to be 200 miles from your nearest neighbor, or building property inside of a moat and surrounding it with machine gun nests.  Advocating a western state does not equal wanting all FSP members to start raising chickens for a living or trading their condos in for teepee's.

From some of the posts in this forum, you'd think that all westerners would think the word "job" referred to a book of the Bible.

Those that can read, that is.   ;D  ::)

TedApelt

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #34 on: December 20, 2002, 09:34:05 am »

With its short distances, the best state by far for activism is Delaware.  From Dover, you can get to just about anywhere in the state in less than an hour.  Climate is better, too.

Wilimgton is also right on the edge of Philadelphia, meaning that people that work in Philly can live in DE (many probably do), and if DE was the FreeState we could recruit people there to help us out without needing to move - they would drive into DE then drive out.

Also, the election logistics are fantastic.  Just THREE COUNTIES!!!  Not too lopsided towards one political party, either.

I think that the FSP made a mistake.  From the very beginning, this should have been called "The Delaware Project", and the plan should have been to move to DE from the beginning.  It is that much of a better choice.
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Zxcv

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #35 on: December 20, 2002, 01:15:09 pm »

Quote
Advocating a western state does not equal wanting to be 200 miles from your nearest neighbor, or building property inside of a moat and surrounding it with machine gun nests.
It doesn't? Dang!  ;)

Just to be honest about it, there are some difficulties with western states, in terms of access. I live in Oregon, and it's clear, for a statewide race, getting to voters in eastern Oregon is harder, and costs more money (because you have to rely on TV and other such media more than door-to-door) than it is in downtown Portland. And more time will be spent on the road.

That being said, if I were running for office on a platform of freedom, I'd sure rather do it in eastern Oregon than in Portland! It's the people, folks, the political climate that matters!

That's why I find this talk about Vermont somewhat unreal. The place has been taken over by Socialists, for Christ's sake! We'd have to expend tons of effort just to get back to "normal" there, let alone advance freedom. What do you think, the socialists who took the trouble to move there, are going to move out just because the FSP chooses Vermont? No, they aren't. They are going to be a powerful opponent that you will have to fight forever.

As to local races, I don't see that western states and rural areas are any more difficult than urban areas. If you're running for office in a town, the town is all you have to deal with.

A true climate of freedom requires wild areas. Here is something I posted over in the "New State Reports" thread:
----------------------------------
I guess one criteria that is not mentioned too much around here is a notion I picked up in Neil Smith's novel Pallas. That is, for freedom to happen, an essential ingredient is that there needs to be a place for people to escape to. I believe this is very important, and explains much of how this country became free even with such unimpressive material to start with as the Puritans. Hard to maintain a little dictatorship when people can simply pick up and walk away from it.

I think the loss of our frontier pretty much coincided with the beginning of the loss of our freedom, another verification of Smith's theory.

Perhaps this is one of my problems with Delaware, compared to a place like Wyoming. It is too small, people are too close, you can't get away from code enforcers and any other government agencies or from busybodies. In a place like Wyoming, people can get away, find a place that suits them. And when people do get together they tend to be friendly, because they don't see all that many of them - not the case in Delaware. I've gone back to Delaware and the DC area on occasion and I find the place a bit too rigid for my taste; people worry about such things as dressing up and so forth. I like being a bit more relaxed. You know, "Knock the horse shit off your shoes, come in and have a beer, and take a look at my new gun."

This is demonstrated by something I did recently. I have an old place in an out-of-the-way place in Oregon. I gutted the whole place and rebuilt it without a single permit. Illegal, yes, theoretically; but who's to complain? My neighbors didn't care - they probably do the same thing. If they even knew what I was doing. On the other hand we had a friend back in suburbia who put a gazebo in his little back yard, without a permit. The neighbor complained to the thugs and he had to take his gazebo down. A friggin' gazebo!
-------------------------------

People in western states often simply ignore bad laws. That's the mentality we want to work with; those are our people.
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Penfist

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #36 on: December 20, 2002, 02:17:06 pm »

Quote
I guess one criteria that is not mentioned too much around here is a notion I picked up in Neil Smith's novel Pallas. That is, for freedom to happen, an essential ingredient is that there needs to be a place for people to escape to. I believe this is very important, and explains much of how this country became free even with such unimpressive material to start with as the Puritans. Hard to maintain a little dictatorship when people can simply pick up and walk away from it.

I think the loss of our frontier pretty much coincided with the beginning of the loss of our freedom, another verification of Smith's theory.

Perhaps this is one of my problems with Delaware, compared to a place like Wyoming. It is too small, people are too close, you can't get away from code enforcers and any other government agencies or from busybodies. In a place like Wyoming, people can get away, find a place that suits them. And when people do get together they tend to be friendly, because they don't see all that many of them - not the case in Delaware. I've gone back to Delaware and the DC area on occasion and I find the place a bit too rigid for my taste; people worry about such things as dressing up and so forth. I like being a bit more relaxed. You know, "Knock the horse shit off your shoes, come in and have a beer, and take a look at my new gun."

This is demonstrated by something I did recently. I have an old place in an out-of-the-way place in Oregon. I gutted the whole place and rebuilt it without a single permit. Illegal, yes, theoretically; but who's to complain? My neighbors didn't care - they probably do the same thing. If they even knew what I was doing. On the other hand we had a friend back in suburbia who put a gazebo in his little back yard, without a permit. The neighbor complained to the thugs and he had to take his gazebo down. A friggin' gazebo!
-------------------------------

People in western states often simply ignore bad laws. That's the mentality we want to work with; those are our people.

I'm about 98% with you here. Can I kick the horseshit off my shoes and have a look at your new gun now?
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varrin

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #37 on: December 20, 2002, 11:47:18 pm »

From the look of those temperature reports about 3 messages up, I'm starting to like Deleware more and more...

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freedomroad

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Climate issues
« Reply #38 on: January 30, 2003, 01:39:25 am »

All of the Western FSP states are somewhat windy.  Wyoming has a reputation for being a windy state.  The truth is some parts of Wyoming are much more winding than America as a whole while others are not.  The following list shows wind speeds at 50 meters above the ground in various WY cities followed by wind speeds for other Western cities.

Wyoming wind categories:
1. 0-12 mph
Cities: Sheridan, Green River, Riverton, Worland, Lander, Jackson, Thermopolis
2. 12-14.5 mph
Cities: Cheyenne, Laramie, Rock Springs, Evanston, Cody, Buffalo, Torrington, New Castle, Pine Bluffs,
3. 14.5-17 mph
Cities: Casper, Gillette, Rawlins,

Other Western Cities:
1. 0-12 mph
Cities: Missoula, MT, Bozeman, MT, Helena, MT, Boise, ID, Lewiston, ID, Spokane, WA
2. 12-14.4 mph
Cities: Billings, MT, Great Falls, MT, Sioux Falls, SD, Pierre, SD, Fargo, ND, Pocatello, ID, Idaho Falls, ID, Ontario, OR
3. 14.4-17 mph
Cities: Rapid City, SD, Aberdeen, SD, Grand Forks,
ND, Bismarck, ND

Overall Western states ranked, least windy to most windy, for large cities:
1. ID
2. MT
3. WY
4. ND
5. SD

Note 1: Most of SD and ND are windy.  However, the most windy parts are the eastern parts.  The western 60% of MT and southeastern part of WY are the most windy parts of those states.  The southeastern part of ID is somewhat windy while most of the rest of the state is not.

Note 2: Comparing the Western and Eastern States is very difficult because the wind speeds in the regions are measured somewhat differently.  However, generally the Eastern FSP states are less windy than the Western states.  Extreme northern New England is somewhat windy with small parts being very windy.  The Eastern coast (from North Carolina to Maine) is somewhat windy.  The coast of Alaska is somewhat windy (the islands are very windy) and AK's interior is mostly calm.

Note 3:  It give you an example, Cheyenne is slightly more windy than Boston.

Source: http://www.windpowermaps.org/windmaps/states.asp#wyoming and related links
« Last Edit: September 08, 2003, 09:46:58 pm by JasonPSorens »
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Zxcv

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Re:Wind in the FSP states, states ranked by wind speeds
« Reply #39 on: January 30, 2003, 06:38:07 pm »

Quote
Overall Western states ranked, least windy to most windy, for large cities:
1. ID
2. MT
3. ND
4. WY
5. SD

Keith, what is the methodology for this ranking? Is there a link?
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freedomroad

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Re:Wind in the FSP states, states ranked by wind speeds
« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2003, 11:44:10 pm »

Quote
Overall Western states ranked, least windy to most windy, for large cities:
1. ID
2. MT
3. WY
4. ND
5. SD

Keith, what is the methodology for this ranking? Is there a link?

I ranked the Western states from least windy to most windy in large cities.  See my source for link(s).
« Last Edit: February 11, 2003, 10:55:26 pm by FreedomRoad »
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Robert H.

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #41 on: February 06, 2003, 03:32:36 am »

In the "for what it's worth" category...

Here are some interesting maps that I came across in regard to weather and other climate-related hazards in the continental U.S.  Specifically, these maps deal with hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, flooding, landslides, and volcanoes.

http://www.usgs.gov/themes/hazards.html

There is also an animated map that superimposes all of these various hazard areas on top of one another:

http://www.usgs.gov/themes/animationmap.html

And here's another page where you can map just about any climate factor you wish (snowfall, lightening, pollen, etc).  You can do this by state and region, or you can look at all of the continental states together:

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/adcbin/public/sitemap.asp

DadELK68

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #42 on: February 06, 2003, 05:51:02 pm »

The most climate information would be the average perceived temperatures (I don't recall the technical term) over the last 'x' years - the measured temperatures adjusted for humidity in the heat and wind-chill in the cold. Can anyone find this information in a comparative format?
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Solitar

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Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2003, 04:02:07 pm »

Some want beaches and coasts but worry about hurricanes.
Some want lots of water and worry about the semi-arid west.
Some want rain but worry about ice and snow.
Some want a decent gardens but worry about humidity and bugs.

Water, water, everywhere...

For some of us out in the dry west, our collection of supplies, stores, and caches would be subject to a lot of damage, rot, rust, mildew, etc. out in the humid east and especially along the salt-air coasts.

For the enlightenment of the dry county folks...
How do you folks along the coasts deal with the humidity?

Copius applications of gun oil and grease?
Packing food in drums and plastic tubs, dehumidified, deoxygenated, and sealed?
Packing valuable papers, photos, etc. in metal tins?
Packing clothes with mothballs?
Rustproof undercoats for the cars and trucks?  Frequent waxing?
What other precautions?
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varrin

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #44 on: February 07, 2003, 04:29:26 pm »

Packing valuable papers, photos, etc. in metal tins?

Silly, who keeps paper these days...  My camera's digital. Just gotta keep the hard drive outta the rain. ;)

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