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Author Topic: State Climates Report  (Read 43684 times)

Kelton

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #45 on: February 07, 2003, 05:43:51 pm »

I'm expecting that somehow we are going to come to some conclusions that will aid us in deciding upon which state, through this discussion?

I may offer some advice based on experience from having lived in a very dry and warm climate, (near Las Vegas,NV); in a temperate desert climate, (Salt Lake City,UT); a humid coastal city(Corpus Christi, TX), and now I live somewhat inland from the coast but still frequently experience San Francisco's weather move inland:

For emergencies like hurricanes, you just get a plan in- place ahead of time.  You have a hopeful destination inland you plan on getting to if a warning comes and a back-up contingency plan if you can't leave home.  This brings up the fact that you should be prepared for emergencies anyways, no matter where you live: I keep a 72-hour kit handy in both the car and at home, with some water, a Katadyn filter, flares, lights, a few snacks, just some basic things in a backpack.  I also keep a year's supply of dry goods & some ammo on hand in case things get real ugly (it's actually a tradition in my church to be a little bit survivalist-oriented, minus the Soldier of Fortune gear, however)


As to daily living in humid climates:

Everything Joe recommends plus. . .
I recommend Scrub Free(tm) mildew remover once-a-week in showers and tubs.
Replacing single - pane windows with double pane or better.
Never leave wet clothing anywhere.
Leave your bathroom fan on for a few hours after bathing or showering.
Use a good unscented body- powder after showering and underwear that wicks- away moisture.
Using an appropriate fungicide in lawns and gardens during wet months.
Run the air conditioner at least 30 secs. once a month, even during the winter.
A few seconds before turning off your car while running the air conditioner, turn the a/c off, and the heater vent on to dry out those vents.


For dry climates:
Find a good body lotion and use it regularly, with sunscreen for all those sunny days that dry climates have.
Find a good lip balm and use it regularly.
When working outside when it is hot, remember that you will dry out very quickly, drink a lot of water!
Use micro- irrigation (drip) systems and you can actually afford to keep even a fruit orchard off culinary water.
Forget about having Kentucky Bluegrass, opt for a variety used at a local golf course, usually some hybridized Bermuda, limit the amount of lawn you want, take advantage of shade- trees.
Consider using an old-fashioned clothes- line (if you and your neighbors can handle the unpretentious practicality)  A traditional electric clothes dryer is one of the most expensive appliances you can use, and your clothes will actually dry faster on a hot summer day.    
hmmm. . . I'm sure I can think of other things. . .
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. . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue --The U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address

Kelton

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2003, 05:50:12 pm »

Varrin,
Would now be a good time to mention that Idaho has the greatest variety of climates among all of our candidate states?


http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/climate_zones.html
« Last Edit: February 07, 2003, 05:59:02 pm by exitus »
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. . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue --The U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address

vermass

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2003, 09:59:02 pm »

  Joe, while what you say would be true in SC (I've lived there). In NH or VT it isn't that humid. I mean it doesn't effect you metal containers. In SC my pictures would stick together. I've never had that happen in MA and MA is more humid than NH or VT. I can't say anything about DE and I will not move there, it's the only place I won't move to. In most of NH salt air isn't a problem only right on the coast. I think that it's going to be harder for east-coasters to adjust to the dry west than it will be for westerners to adjust
to the northeast. If FL was one of the choices what you say would be true. NH and VT are not really humid. I spent a summer in TX one year it allways seemed to be over 100F when I got home to MA in september I found the humidity bothered me but NH and VT are not as humid and the mountains even less so (allthough you westerners might call them hills) My guns don't rust. I don't give them special treatment. As for vehicles well......OK, it's VERY difficult to keep the salt spray from the roads in the winter from eating your vehicle. They don't salt the roads in AK (or at least they didn't when I used to live there). I hope this answers some of your questions.
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Robert H.

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2003, 05:23:03 am »

As to daily living in humid climates:

Everything Joe recommends plus. . .

Replacing single - pane windows with double pane or better.

I lived in Pensacola, Florida for three and a half years and there were days there when the humidity made it seem difficult to breathe.  Exitus' advice on replacing those window panes hit home immediately.  Mildew around our windows was a constant battle.

stepdave

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #49 on: February 10, 2003, 12:10:09 pm »

Some want beaches and coasts but worry about hurricanes.
Some want lots of water and worry about the semi-arid west.
Some want rain but worry about ice and snow.
Some want a decent gardens but worry about humidity and bugs.

Water, water, everywhere...

For some of us out in the dry west, our collection of supplies, stores, and caches would be subject to a lot of damage, rot, rust, mildew, etc. out in the humid east and especially along the salt-air coasts.

For the enlightenment of the dry county folks...
How do you folks along the coasts deal with the humidity?

Copius applications of gun oil and grease?
Packing food in drums and plastic tubs, dehumidified, deoxygenated, and sealed?
Packing valuable papers, photos, etc. in metal tins?
Packing clothes with mothballs?
Rustproof undercoats for the cars and trucks?  Frequent waxing?
What other precautions?
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Zxcv

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Re:Coasts, water supply, humidity -- again and again we read this...
« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2003, 08:07:54 pm »

Quote
Consider using an old-fashioned clothes- line (if you and your neighbors can handle the unpretentious practicality)

I was stationed in 29 Palms, California in the service. I used to get the load of clothes out of the washer and start hanging on the line. By the time I got done hanging I went back to the front of the line and started taking clothes down again!

That place was dry... :o
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stepdave

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2003, 02:18:51 pm »

When talking about climates people tend to dismiss the thought of Alaska being a prime candidate for the best state.  Truth is, Alaska has 7 different climate regions and the weather here is milder than most of the states being looked at.

Contrary to popular belief, we don't all live in igloos and ride around in dog sleds.

Alaskans never worry about such things as thunder storms, tornados, droughts, or major flooding.
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freedomroad

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2003, 04:19:11 pm »

Additional info:

Average January Temperatures for selected Wyoming cities:        
Cheyenne, WY                        26.4 F      
Cody, WY                               24.1 F          
Casper, WY                  22.3 F
Yoder, WY                              27.0 F       
Pine Bluffs, WY                      26.8 F      
Wheatland, WY                       28.2 F      
Sheridan, WY                          20.0 F      
Rock Springs, WY                  20.1 F      
Laramie, WY                           20.2 F      
Yellowstone Park, WY           19.1 F      
      
Average January Temperature for other selected cities:      
Grand Forks, ND                    5.3 F   
Sioux Falls, SD       14.0 F
Anchorage, AK       15.8 F
Burlington, VT       18.0 F
Augusta, ME       19.0 F
Berlin, NH                                 14.6 F      
Concord, NH       18.9 F
Keene, NH                                20.9 F      
Glasgow, MT       10.8 F
Great Falls, MT                         21.2 F      
Miles City, MT                          16.0 F      
Butte, MT                                16.7 F      
Helena, MT                             19.8 F      
Idaho Falls, ID                        20.5 F      
Coeur d Alene, ID                   28.6 F      
Pocatello, ID       24.4 F
Wilmington, DE       30.4 F
Source: ftp://ftp.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/support/climate/taps/
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freedomroad

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Re:West Nebraska climate in Southeast Wyoming
« Reply #53 on: March 17, 2003, 04:02:33 pm »

Very good info, Joe.  I wrote a report on Torrington which follows.



Torrington, WY              Goshen County seat

Torrington is a wonderful small town. The Torrington area is mostly farmland; however, Torrington is within just a few miles of the mountains. It has all of the common social clubs such as the Rotary Club, Kiwanis Club, Lions Club, Moose Club, AARP, Boy Scouts, and the American Legion. Torrington has a museum, golf course, swimming pool, skate park, and more than a half dozen baseball fields. A gym, bowling alley, movie theater, and tennis courts are all found in Torrington. Torrington has one of almost every type of church and is home to Eastern Wyoming (Community) College with 1,400 full and part-time students. Torrington has 19 restaurants including fast food such as: Arby's, Taco John's, Subway, Pizza Hut, Hardee's, and Burger King. Several specialty restaurants, such as the LaFamilia Prado Mexican Food, the Peking Garden, Chuckwagon Bakery and Café, Java Jar, and a catering restaurant are all found in Torrington.  Both a small Sears and a JCPenny are located in Torrington, and Scottsbluff, NE has regular Sears and JCPenny along with Wal-Mart Supercenter and Target.

The city has around 6,000 people. Torrington is on the Wyoming/Nebraska border and its people enjoy the benefits of both states.  Mitchell, NE (with 2,000 people) is only 21 miles from Torrington. The Scottsbluff/Gering, NE MSA with 27,000 people is only 31 miles from Torrington, WY. Scottsbluff has small branches of several colleges, a zoo, and a medical center the serves a 90,000+ people region.  Because of Torrington’s proximity to Scottsbluff's large medical center, it would make a great home for medical paraprofessionals and professionals wanting to live in a friendly town.  Torrington has both low cost of living and low housing costs.  The average single wide mobile home for 2002 was only $306 (including lot and water).  The average two bedroom apartment was only $320.  A 2 to 3 bedroom house, for the same period, rented for $427 per month.  

Torrington shines in the weather department.  Torrington is part of Wyoming's warmest region, known as the Banana Belt region of Wyoming.   The region makes up much of Platte and Goshen Counties.  Wyoming's Banana Belt region is warmer than most of MT, SD, ND, VT, NH, ME, and AK.  This area has less humid summers than the northeastern states, making it feel cooler (in the summer) than most of the country. Torrington gets less than 30 inches of snow and 14.5 inches of rain per year.  This compares very favorably to the northeastern FSP states.  NH, for example, gets between 55 and 90 inches of snow and between 35 and 45 inches of rain per year.  Torrington is less windy than SD, ND, much of WY, and about equal to the average wind speeds of MT.  These factors make Torrington the ideal town for people that do not like a great deal of snow and want a dry, somewhat warm climate.  

Torrington is geographically surrounded by several attractions. The North Platte River and 2 streams pass through Torrington. The Hawk Springs rec. area with boating and canoeing is around 30 minutes south of Torrington. 20 minutes west of Torrington is the Fort Laramie National Historic Site and to the east is the Scotts Bluff National Monument.  The beautiful Laramie Mountains are very close to Torrington.  The huge Glendo State Park and Reservoir is less than 1 hour from Torrington.  The Glendo Park offers 300 camp sites and 500 picnic areas.  An abundant supply of walleyes, white and black crappie, and even some trout and catfish are found in the lake waters.  Casper’s ski slope area is less than a 3 hour winter drive west of Torrington.  Some of the ski trials, near Casper, are night light and Casper offers 80 miles of snowmobile trails. The Black Hills of WY/SD, with five national parks, ski resorts, several casinos, and the world’s most famous motorcycle rally, is 3 to 4 hours north of Torrington.

Torrington is 33 miles from Guernsey (1,100), 56 miles from Lusk, WY (1,500), 61 miles from Wheatland, WY (3,600), 83 miles from Cheyenne, 131 miles from Laramie, 143 miles from Casper, and 229 miles from Denver.  Being just over 1 1/2 hours from Cheyenne, Torrington is part of Cheyenne's extended MSA of 150,000+ people.  Retired military that currently use a military hospital do not need to worry about losing access to free medical facilities.  The Warren Air Force Base, adjacent to Cheyenne has a military hospital. Torrington is a great central location for a person wanting to be within a 2 1/2 hour drive of Wyoming's 3 largest cities and less than 4 hours from Denver.  

Links:
Torrington City http://www.city-of-torrington.org/
Eastern Wyoming College http://ewc.wy.edu/visitor/
Scottsbluff City http://www.ci.scottsbluff.ne.us/
Scottsbluff/Gering Chamber of Commerce http://www.scottsbluffgering.net/
Fort Laramie National Historic Site http://www.nps.gov/fola/
Glendo Reservoir http://wyoparks.state.wy.us/glendo1.htm
Casper Ski Area http://www.ski-guide.com/overview.cfm/wy05.htm
Black Hills http://www.blackhillsentertainment.com/
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freedomroad

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Re:West Nebraska climate in Southeast Wyoming
« Reply #54 on: March 17, 2003, 04:06:57 pm »

Southeastern Wyoming has warmer winters than all of ND, SD, AK, VT, ME, NH, ME, MT, and most of ID.  Or at least, all of my almost 30 hours of climate and weather related research show this.  See the Case for Alaska thread for a detailed listing on winter temps in various cities in all 10 states, to compare for yourself.
http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?board=5;action=display;threadid=1456;start=0
« Last Edit: March 17, 2003, 04:07:36 pm by FreedomRoad »
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Zxcv

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Re:West Nebraska climate in Southeast Wyoming
« Reply #55 on: March 17, 2003, 05:47:28 pm »

Little (for Wyoming) Goshen County, for which I believe Torrington is the county seat, is 2225 square miles, somewhat larger than the land area of the state of Delaware (1955 sq mi). There are 12,389 people in the county, compared to 796,165 in Delaware, as of 2001.

It's probably cheaper and easier running for the top office in this county, than in any of the Delaware counties...   ;)
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Zxcv

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #56 on: March 17, 2003, 06:47:57 pm »

Time to go back to the drawing board, Joe and Keith. This is not an honest list. Yoder is a town of 169, Chugwater of 192, both in the banana belt of Wyoming. Makes it look like a little skulduggery, loading up the list with ringers like that.  ::)

A much better approach would be to get the termperatures and snow (and maybe wind if its available, and even summer humidity) of the N largest population cities in each state. Maybe even do a spreadsheet of it, and weigh temperatures according to population. That would be a lot closer to the distribution the FSPers would face in the state.

But then, that would be a lot of work, too! So maybe we should just stick with what Jason did, for Jan temperatures. It should be good enough. Our glass-eaters shouldn't mind a temp difference of a few degrees, one way or another...   ;)

« Last Edit: March 17, 2003, 06:49:12 pm by Zxcv »
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exitus

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #57 on: March 17, 2003, 08:16:08 pm »

I just spoke with Varrin, who has been busily working on a climate report of his own.  It looks quite thorough and objective, using the largest cities, averages, etc.    Varrin? Is that report ready for release yet?  I know you were still double-checking a few cities. . .

____________
Also remember, in our largest cities, there is the "urban-heat-island" effect, which tends to raise the average temperature a degree or two in big cities.  Also, don't be decieved by lack of snowfall.  The coldest places tend to snow the least.  Also remember that the temperature year-round is important, in other words, the growing season.  Some places may have the warmest January, but if the snow starts falling in August, big deal.
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". . .the foundations of our national policy should be laid in private morality. If individuals be not influenced by moral principles, it is in vain to look for public virtue” -- U.S. Senate's reply to George Washington's first inaugural address

varrin

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #58 on: March 17, 2003, 08:56:25 pm »

exitus:

Nope, it's not quite ready yet.  If I'm going to release it, I want it to be right.  

I do agree with zxcv's suggestion about city size and believe that's a fair analysis.  I have some source material ready for mine, but not all of it.  Clearly posting xyz pop 100 weather over abc pop 5000 wx when abc pop 5000 wx is better isn't quite fair (case in point, a town near boise with annual snowfall less than 10" per year which is left off Joe's list).  I'll finish it up and get it out as soon as I have a chance.  It'll go along with some other important thoughts I've been meaning to work on too.

V-

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Zxcv

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #59 on: March 17, 2003, 09:44:07 pm »

Quote
Also remember, in our largest cities, there is the "urban-heat-island" effect, which tends to raise the average temperature a degree or two in big cities.
As far as I'm concerned, that's legitimate. Those people feel that temperature; it doesn't matter that they themselves are a cause of a small part of it.

It makes me nervous that people might be basing their choice on temperature. Yeah, I can see eliminating a city like Fairbanks (as a place to move), and maybe even a state like ND, based on the temperature; but beyond that it is really being silly to base a choice on termperature. Who cares if Portland, ME is 20.9 while Casper, WY is 22.3?
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