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Author Topic: State Climates Report  (Read 43386 times)

Mark

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2002, 12:52:26 am »

Mark,

The admin folks here can't move parts of threads, BUT YOU CAN !
Start a thread under General FSP or maybe under General Libertarian
then copy your stuff from here, paste it over there
then come back here and delete these non-climate posts.
That's what I do a lot when I catch myself writing posts that would be more easily found and read elsewhere -- where the thread title describes the contents.

When your done, then MouseBorg and I can delete out posts here.
and get back to climate stuff.


Joe, you are being a wise ass. I love wise asses.  ;D


You will notice that *my* thread of posts involves a climate theme. I began an "insuffurable" cost reference by quoting the Declaration of Independance. I guess I stepped over FSP protocol by c'n'p the whole thing.


You see Joe, as a Libertarian Socialist I know tyranny doesn't always come at the hands of people, but at nature itself. If we all find ourselves in a pit, we are just as unfree regardless of how we were put there.


As a progressive Libertarian Socialist, I see pits as pro-freedom. We can use them to store water and thermal energy. But I guess that would be off-topic for this thread, no?  ;)
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bakedchip

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Climate and related issues
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2002, 10:23:46 am »

There's been discussion about prospective states' job prospects and climate.  Some have said that they have to be in an urban area of some sort in order to find a job.  Others are planning to buy lots of land and have their nearest neighbor a mile or so away.  Some don't care what climate they move to.  Others are concerned about the cold, or the humidity.

I feel I should remind folks that we are trying to get 20,000 activists into a state.  Not 20,000 liberty-loving bums who sit around and debate but don't do anything.  Not 20,000 homesteaders who build their own house, garden, and isolate themselves from the rest of the population.

20,000 political activists.

This means that if conditions prevent people from being activists, we have a problem.  If an activist is unable to outreach to others because they can't breathe well due to the climate, we have a problem.  If a person can't work the crowd at the county fair because their knees (or another body part) will fail due to the cold, we have a problem.  If we can't put together a decent campaign because nobody can afford to donate money - because there are no jobs - we have a problem.

Not everyone here is a "rugged individualist" or an entrepreneur.  I know some will become ditch diggers or sweep floors or whatever is necessary, but some cannot.  And even if everyone did that, we'd have no money and wouldn't amount to anything anyway.

Yes, we're trying to obtain a free state - and we're trying to do that via the political process.  That means we have to engage in politics.  Not the "I'll spew any BS to get elected" type, but the knocking on doors, shaking babies and kissing hands, get involved in the community activist type.

 :)   We've got to be able to succeed at this.  We can't afford to screw this up.

- Chip Spangler
« Last Edit: September 08, 2003, 09:54:10 pm by JasonPSorens »
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PTboy

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2002, 01:11:27 pm »

Hey Chip!

I agree ~~ 20K political activists! Amen!

PT Boy
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Zxcv

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2002, 01:26:18 pm »

Quote
Quote:Yeah, and some of us have wives, too. And some of those wives may not be cold-weather types. And some of us husbands may not quite be up to ordering wives to follow us wherever we may want to go.


Jeez. Rugged individuals we ain't. Thank God Washington and the old school had a pair, eh?

Redbeard, it's a new age. For better or worse.

I'm a father, and I don't believe in breaking up my family for any reason. I knew I'd have to tone down my activist tendencies when we decided to have a child.

He won't be a child forever.

I agree with the general sentiment that weather should not matter at all. It doesn't, to me.
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varrin

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2002, 03:51:39 pm »

Chip,

Ya hit the nail on the head.  Thanks.

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Dave Mincin

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2002, 05:19:40 pm »

Do you folks have any real idea what homesteading is about...Carving out a place to live from nature?   Homesteading is a lifes work no time for anything else, except family and your faith.  If we really want a freestate we must be perpared to press the flesh...knock on doors and devote much of our time to the effort....Then maybe, just maybe, our children will be fee to do as they chose without government interference.





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mtPete

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2002, 08:46:21 pm »

On the other hand, what is more important to you: the weather/population or liberty?
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Robert H.

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Weather-Related Flight Delays
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2002, 04:28:48 am »

Here's an interesting map on weather-related flight delays across the continental 48 states:

http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,113%257E7301%257E%257E%257Eflight%257E,00.html

Racer X

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2002, 04:43:00 am »

That map only shows delays for that particular day, right?  I see you've been reading a Fairbanks, Alaska newspaper.  That 5 day forecast is looking a little chilly ;D

Racer X
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Robert H.

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #24 on: December 18, 2002, 06:02:50 am »

That map only shows delays for that particular day, right?  I see you've been reading a Fairbanks, Alaska newspaper.  That 5 day forecast is looking a little chilly ;D

Racer X

Actually, it updates periodically, but I'm not certain at what intervals.  I know it was different when I first located it.

And yes, Fairbanks is a place that probably wouldn't see much FSP involvement due to those temperatures, which only get more colorful as winter progresses!   ;D  Not to mention the twenty + hours of darkness near the winter solstice.   :o  It's one of the best places in the world to view the Northern Lights though, and I'd probably visit for the novelty, but I doubt I'd be staying on very long!

I do read a couple of Alaskan newspapers rather regularly.  The Fairbanks News-Miner is one, as is the Anchorage Daily News.  Click on either name for links to them.  The News-Miner has a neat Fairbanks real-time cam, but both of them provide an insight into life in a rather different place.  ADN runs a number of letters-to-the-editor, which are quite useful in trying to get a glimpse into the thoughts of current state residents.

bakedchip

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #25 on: December 18, 2002, 10:22:06 am »

On the other hand, what is more important to you: the weather/population or liberty?

Liberty, without a doubt.  But consider what we're doing ...

We are trying to peacefully gain political power in a state through the political process.  This means we're going to be campaigning - a lot.  We'll have people working at county fairs and other events, attending council meetings, going door to door talking to voters, gathering petition signatures, putting up signs, printing materials, speaking to the legislature, etc.  This requires hard work, time, and money.

To have time to be an activist, one cannot spend all of one's time on other activities:
  • If one has to work two jobs to feed their family, they won't have time to be an activist.
  • If one can find a job in another state - two hours away - then they're going to spend four hours a day commuting, and guess what - they have no time to be an activist.  They also won't be able to be very active in their community if they're gone from it at least 12 hours a day.
  • If one is spending all of their time homesteading land, they're not going to have time to be an activist.
  • If the climate stops some folks because they can barely walk in the cold, or have trouble breathing because of the humidity, then they're not going to be effective as an activist.


If people are unable to find jobs, or have to work two jobs in order to raise enough money to live - how are we going to be able to raise money for campaigning?  The short answer is: we can't.  TV and radio and newspaper ads cost money.  Bumper stickers cost money.  Yard signs cost money.  Billboards cost money.  Gasoline to get around the state and campaign costs money.  Campaigns cost a lot of money.

Liberty is why we're involved in the FSP.  That's why we have to make sure that wherever we go, we will have the resources necessary to work for liberty.  If we don't, we'll fail.

- Chip Spangler
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Zxcv

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #26 on: December 18, 2002, 03:42:07 pm »

Here are some wind maps of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.
http://www.windpowermaps.org/windmaps/states.asp#wyoming
Look at my favorite, Wyoming. I think I'm going to be ill. :-[

Well, you can always find a nice canyon to live in...

Note the non-linear wind scale; these maps are for production of wind power.

I don't know what's up with the .pdf immages, the Wyoming one was all blue. The jpgs have the detail.

Maybe other state maps can be found like these, with some poking around on the Internet.

Well, if we end up in Wyoming, I know where I'm getting my electrical power from! ::)
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Zxcv

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #27 on: December 18, 2002, 04:25:07 pm »

More maps:
http://www.eren.doe.gov/windpoweringamerica/wind_resources.html

These are a bit hard to compare, because different color pallettes are used, different scales, and so forth. You have to look at them a little harder than at first glance.

Dakotas look pretty windy, too. At lease Wyoming has some quieter areas...
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Chuckster

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Re:climate, jobs, and activism
« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2002, 08:22:43 pm »

I'm with RacerX on this one.  See no need to repeat your very well stated argument Racer but would like to point out that MY 40 acres in Orleans county VT aint all that big; roughly 1800X900 feet and driving down the (Dirt) road that connects the two villages I'll drive past six neighbors in seven miles.  OTOH if I don't go looking, I won't see any of them for days or even weeks. 3.5 miles to the General Store and I can get all the socializing and discussion of local issues I want.

One can play cowboy, even in Vermont (Famous for Morgan Horses) and my real estate agent there recently contact me, knowing that I am looking for more land, with an offer of 52.75 acres of woodland near Jay for $55K. I expect to buy my neighbors south pasture (about 40 acres) which adjoins my place on the North, to give me a total of 80 acres and put my house smack in the middle, 900 feet from the road and 900 feet from any property line (900 feet from the best trout stream in the Northeast Kingdom  ;))

Westerners all seem to be obsessed with being able to get in a car and drive at 90 mph for a couple of hours without passing a town and see nothing wrong with a 100+ mile commute to work in another state. That's what they mean when they talk of Freedom - no people around for miles and miles.  Personally I find this idea of isolation=freedom unacceptable.

IMHO Vermont offers the best combination of accessible towns, villages and Burlington (The only real city); employment opportunities with companies like IBM, and entrepreneurial opportunities in various sectors. It seems to me that Vermont has something for just about everyone EXCEPT extremely long commuting distances but if you insist, you can live in Troy and commute to Burlington on the Interstate (About 90 miles)

My point is that the Westerners can have land and privacy but may have to forgo being able to climb the hill and gaze over hundreds of square miles of nothing but open range.  Homesteaders can buy an old farm or part of one for the price of a new car and still be close enough to the village to interact with other FSPers and engage in political activism through the town meeting system. Those who need more conventional jobs can live in larger towns or Burlington and work for IBM or the Universities or in retail large and small.  Agribusiness is still a mainstay of the Vermont economy and there are certainly opportunities there.  People like me will be hiring help, starting small businesses etc.

Oh yeah; the socialism thing in Vermont is not all that popular among "Real Vermonters", at least in my experience. 8)
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Robert H.

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Re:State Climates Report
« Reply #29 on: December 19, 2002, 04:30:09 am »

Here's what climate conditions are like in these candidate state cities (current evening temps) close to the winter solstice:

Alaska

Anchorage:  19°F, 91% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  24°/21°)
Fairbanks:  2°, 81% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  7°/1°)
Juneau:  30°, 100% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  31°/23°)
Kodiak:  21°, 61% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  37°/34°)

Delaware:

Wilmington:  29°, 86% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  52°/48°)
Dover:  28°, 100% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  50°/46°)

Idaho

Boise:  31°, 74% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  36°/27°)
Idaho Falls:  19°, 83% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  25°/13°)
Twin Falls:  22°, 78% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  35°/24°)

Maine

Caribou:  7°, 72% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  27°/22°)
Bangor:  15°, 65% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  37°/29°)
Portland:  19°, 62% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  41°/34°)

Montana

Great Falls:  22°, 66% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  32°/16°)
Butte:  10°, 81% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  24°/6°)
Billings:  28°, 43% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  35°/16°)

New Hampshire

Manchester:  15°, 80% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  42°/37°)
Concord:  9°, 85% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  40°/32°)
Berlin:  -2°, 79% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  40°/26°)

North Dakota

Fargo:  32°, 93% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  35°/18°)
Minot:  28°, 86% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  30°/20°)
Bismarck: 30°, 86% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  33°/20°)

South Dakota

Pierre:  36°, 67% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  40°/19°)
Rapid City:  34°, 44% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  43°/16°)

Vermont

Montpelier:  3°, 75% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  36°/31°)
Burlington:  13°, 77% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  38°/31°)

Wyoming

Cheyenne:  21°, 53% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  35°/15°)
Casper:  11°, 77% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  32°/14°)
Sheridan:  25°, 53% humidity (tomorrow's hi/low:  34°/13°)

Source:  The Weather Channel
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