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Author Topic: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis  (Read 2366 times)

FranCo Free

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Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« on: February 26, 2016, 01:18:45 pm »

2-26-16

When society breaks down, we can build anew on more sound footing!!!

Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis, and Hopefully this Will be a Community discussion;so what will we all need??

http://www.backwoodshome.com/
http://www.granny-miller.com/101-basic-homesteading-skills/
http://www.motherearthnews.com/
http://www.granny-miller.com/list-of-articles/
http://www.backtobasicliving.com/


 preppers and survivalists
 
(From an Article that I found interesting; Can we take lessons to Incorporate into our lives from this article blow)

The fact of the matter is, many of the skills and life choices often associated with modern survivalist living or prepping, were at one time the everyday skills and choices of simple living and traditional, old fashion common sense.


So you can imagine my chagrin when 10 or 12 years ago a dear friend described my life as that of “being a survivalist”.
I knew what she meant and what she was trying to convey. I took her description as a backhanded compliment.
My friend was trying to find the words to communicate and illustrate a lifestyle that is self-sustaining, non-consumer oriented and not completely dependent upon “the grid”.
Her comment gave me food for thought.
I found it curious that a way of life that would have been considered quite normal and middle class in western Pennsylvania from the 1920s to1970s, was by the year 2000, considered to be extraordinary, radical and a tad kooky.
I also found it interesting that in less than 2 generations the average American household had become for the most part, an isolated and non-productive, debt driven economic model.
The concept of a traditional and contained productive household economy had become alien. The American “housewife” was rare and becoming an anathema in modern America.
She was going the way of the dodo bird.


The most basic of human needs revolve around food, clothing and shelter.
And those needs are only met by an understanding of who we are as people and of our particular environment; combined with a good and sensible stewardship of our individual circumstances. The exact ideas and concepts that preppers and survivalists have as of late begun to realize – and that’s a really good thing.
The lack of traditional housewifery and the lost concept of self-contained household economies which are interconnected with other traditional households, seems in part to have been the breeding ground for the modern survivalist and prepper moment.
America became a helpless and dependent society the day American housewives quit working for themselves and their households, and became wage slaves for someone else.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survival_skills
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 07:20:03 pm by FranCo Free »
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JLTW

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2016, 09:23:03 pm »

I had posted in housing about WOOFING and permaculture as a means of poorer freestaters moving successfully. WOOFING stands for World Wide Opportunities On Farms. You volunteer 20-30 hours a week on a farm in exchange for food and shelter.

The idea is, poor freestaters like myself are already applying primary nature resource skills that you have described, because it is relevant to us in the moment.

Todd Workman (and supporters) is renovating the whole town of Franklin through permaculture principles. The Earthship design of home is very popular among freestaters. Despite skepticism around the cold weather of New Hampshire, permaculture-style housing that pays for itself is highly probable in all types of climates. See: the rocket stove mass heater. We have had successful nature-minded housing in different parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin for about a decade+ now. (The Twin Cities, my home area, is the permaculture capital of the world).

Considering housing will be one of the most lucrative commodities for the FSP very soon, getting into nature-minded housing is a good idea not only for off-grid independence but also creating independent communities within the FSP.
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FranCo Free

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2016, 10:42:47 pm »

You've caught my interest, but I'm not familiar with some of the names and terms you wrote about.  I hope you'll fill me in on some of these things.  What exactly is WOOFING and permaculture?  Who is Todd Workman and what is his position?  Were you referring to Franklin, New Hampshire?  Are you currently living in New Hampshire?  I'd like to know more about the Earthship home design.  Do you have any website links to share that would give me more information?
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JLTW

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2016, 01:50:39 pm »

The Earthship is truly an astounding design. The biggest challenge in New Hampshire is designing for a cold climate, and the colder winter gets, the more flexible the building has to be for weather extremes (hot summers, cold winters). I've been learning about viable solutions for that- it's an achievable challenge but only if you are aware and mindful.

Here is the Earthship main website: http://earthship.com/

You can go on a two-week building and learning course for $400 in the world's capital, Taos New Mexico. I've been playing around with the idea of doing that for a while.

The cheapest Earthship will cost about $3,500 to make, and once built provides all resources necessary to live. The only cost to get rid of after that is property tax. If we have a whole village of people dedicated to doing this in a cozy area of the boondocks, complete tax rejection and off-grid living could be viable.

A reasonably priced Earthship is around $7,000. Some people spend up to $15,000 if you include modern luxuries such as high class furniture, TV, computer etc. But if $15,000 is the equivalent of a $100,000 home, surely we're on the right track. The Earthship is the pinnacle, the father, of all natural built homes and makes the Tiny Home revolution look preschool.

---

As for Franklin, NH and Todd Workman, I was in contact with him about 9 months ago last spring/summer. He's pretty accessible to reach but right now I hear he's having issues with government regulation of the land and properties he's bought. Unfortunately I am not seeing enough civil disobedience among Freestaters to protect him from this, and I don't even know if he is affiliated with the FSP or an anarchist, so he might be inclined to work with the city for all I know.

Feb 2016 - Bring More Business to Franklin
http://www.concordmonitor.com/news/work/business/21203176-95/downtown-coordinator-developer-continuing-franklin-growth

PermaCityLife - the permaculture design group of Franklin
http://www.permacitylife.com/

WOOFING stands for Worldwide Opportunities on Farms. You volunteer farm labour (usually part time) in exchange for shelter, food and farm skills.

United States WOOFING: https://wwoofusa.org/

Official WOOFING is like a brand, and it costs $40 a year to use their site, but with extra effort you might be able to find a farm connection unofficially, outside of the brand.

The Bardo Project is an NH permaculture farm that might be worth contacting: http://bardoproject.com/
Their site is not updated past 2013 by my exploring, but they still have contacts on there and a few posts in 2015. Their farm is 2 hours south of Lancaster, where PorcFest is. I was considering their farm as one of my first picks, but on the WOOFING site I also found a farm effort on a hotel on an island south of Portsmouth! Island hotel permaculture = so freaking awesome.
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Luck

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Finding Cheap Rooms in NH
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2016, 01:41:40 pm »

To find cheap rooms, there's a Free Site for Couch Surfing.

One way to use the site to find cheap rooms is to do a web search using the following exact terms:
site:couchsurfing.com "new hampshire" -not

The last term, -not, eliminates people who are NOT accepting guests. The dash or minus sign before a search term tells the search engine to look for webpages that do not have that term. You do not want to find people who are NOT accepting guests, so including -not in the search bypasses them.
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FranCo Free

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2016, 03:14:18 pm »

To find cheap rooms, there's a Free Site for Couch Surfing.

That is a survival skill!!!!!!!!! ;)   
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JLTW

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2016, 01:45:10 pm »

There's a lot of sites like Couch Surfing and AirBnB and Meetup for this kind of networking. The problem is building a good reputation on all of those sites. It takes a lot of unnecessary work to rebuild a reputation on each site when I really just need something simpler and more accessible. I'm not trying to make a career out of being a verified popular traveller.
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Luck

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Re: Basic Skills Needed for survival on a day to day basis
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2016, 02:14:45 pm »

I don't think you need to build a reputation on the couch surfing site in order to find people who may provide a cheap room.
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