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Author Topic: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)  (Read 1951 times)

SkippyBob

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Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« on: January 11, 2016, 10:13:38 am »

In a couple of posts, Jason Sorens has stated that much of the communication
among FSP participants has migrated to Facebook rather than staying on this
forum.  This is surprising and disheartening for me.  That a group that one would
assume is against government surveillance of the citizens would so willingly
embrace corporate surveillance bothers me.  I am glad there are still some people
using the forum, because at this point I don't have any intention of joining
Facebook just to communicate with people.

A short commentary about social media in general (and not focusing specifically on
privacy) was posted to the Wendy McElroy blog by her husband Brad:
http://www.wendymcelroy.com/news.php?extend.6898.15

Wendy's blog also posted an interesting link about how conspiracy theories and
science news both spread on Facebook with very similar hour-by-hour data
curves:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-intersect/wp/2016/01/07/an-hour-by-hour-look-at-how-a-conspiracy-theory-becomes-truth-on-facebook/

And, as chance would have it,  just today a comic I read called Diesel Sweeties has made
a Facebook comment (using Doctor Who, Star Wars, and Star Trek references):
http://www.dieselsweeties.com/archive/3976

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RidleyReport

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2016, 04:13:21 pm »

It's a good point skippy.  But we do sometimes have to go where the people are...

Internet chatter was better in the days where it was on this forum instead of the less public and less archivable facebook.  So a fair number of us keep active here and hope for more folks like you to join us.
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SkippyBob

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2016, 02:12:58 pm »

I am glad you are keeping the forum alive, and thanks for the kind words.
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politicalGRAFFITI

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2016, 11:29:52 pm »

I don't do Face book either.

I remember libertarians fighting the DARPA program Total Information Awateness


Than for many to embrace a voluntary version...

slothman

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2016, 11:47:10 pm »

Maybe that's why there are so few posts here.
Irregardless, I don't use Facebook either; for the reasons you described.
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seriousfoolishness

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2016, 08:44:00 pm »

What really is the difference? If the NSA is recording "everything", then they are recording this too.
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politicalGRAFFITI

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2016, 03:56:18 am »

What really is the difference? If the NSA is recording "everything", then they are recording this too.

The difference is that the Facebook user is compiling a dossier on themselves.

I've told people before... In the past if the feds wanted you, sure they could figure most everything out about you, but it took work and time. So the truth was that due to limited resources they were limited to keeping track of Martin Luther King and other dangerous characters.

It's fine that many people enjoy and find useful the free service that Facebook provides. But, just remember it's not free, you are the product they are selling.

SkippyBob

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Re: Facebook vs. The Forum (and science and conspiracy theories)
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2016, 02:45:15 am »

I agree with politicalGRAFFITI and QBcrusher on the negatives of Facebook.  However,
unlike QBcrusher, I am not social enough to feel the need to use it anyway.  I am a bit
of an introvert.

To respond to the statement by seriousfoolishness, the purpose of posting here rather than
on Facebook isn't to avoid NSA surveillance.  The purpose is to refuse to participate in something
that I find objectionable.

I don't have an ad-blocker installed, because I don't turn on Javascript in the first place.
I won't turn Javascript on even for the FSP, which has caused issues with my being able to use the
website in the past.  Thankfully, the current version is mostly functional without it.  I also
have animations turned off in my browser, so animated GIF ads aren't an eyesore either.

Here is an article from WendyMcElroy.com about Forbes refusing people with ad-blockers,
then serving up malware-infected ads to those who obediently turned them off:
http://www.wendymcelroy.com/news.php?extend.6911.15

I don't use any cloud services.  Here is an amusing Diesel Sweeties that pretty much
expresses my feelings:
http://www.dieselsweeties.com/hstrips/0/3/9/3/03931.png

I pay cash wherever I go, and only resort to the credit card when I have messed up and
not gone to the ATM recently enough.

I don't have a GPS or any data link (that I know of) back to the manufacturer of
my car (low-end Toyota Yaris with manual locks and crank-down windows).
A friend from work has a van (Chrysler, I think).  It came with the hardware for
some sort of instant-assistance service, but he didn't want to pay for the service
itself.  He pulled the fuse for the hardware and, even though he wasn't a subscriber,
the company called him and asked him to put the fuse back in because they still
liked to check in on the car now and again.  Of course he refused  (to re-fuse).

I remove all the RFID tags I can find from the DVDs I buy at Barnes and Noble before
I leave the counter.  I SHOULD do the same for the occasional DVD I buy at the
supermarket, but I usually forget.  Which is too bad, since they're the ones with the
mysterious black rectangular device mounted over the exit door pointed at the
customers.  The book I read that made me despise the things is:
"Spychips: How Major Corporations and Government Plan To Track Your Every Move With RFID"
by Katherine Albrecht.

I don't have WiFi in my house, and I don't ever plan to have "Internet of Things" devices in my home.

I am in need of a new computer, and my plan is to build two.  One will not ever be connected to
a network, and will contain writable media.  The other one will be connected to the network, but
will boot from write-once media (currently CD or DVD) and won't contain writable media.  The only
exception will have to be a USB boot drive of some sort for email, which is inherently stateful.

So, the purpose isn't always to make the NSA fight for their information.  The corporate world (and
computer crackers) should find things difficult (or impossible) as well.  (And as for turning off Javascript,
animated GIFs, and sometimes even StyleSheets, this has the added bonus of making for a more serene,
less garish browsing experience.)
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