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Author Topic: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire  (Read 4061 times)

JoinOrDie

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Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« on: June 01, 2015, 12:47:15 pm »



About Me:

  • I am in my early 20s, and male.
  • I have a degree in philosophy and political science
  • I am undertaking a software engineering degree
  • I am Australian.

I love Australia, it's a fantastic country. It has brilliant white beaches and a lot of wide open space with no police within cooee. However, Australia doesn't love me. It's a very totalitarian society, where everything is phrased in terms of the public health.

Every one of my hobbies I have ever taken up has either been: illegal, onerously regulated, or licensed by the state for an annual fee. I am paying thousands of dollars each year so I can shoot, drive my car, keep a beehive, have my ATV licensed, own my venomous snakes, have a fishing license, etc, etc, etc. As a student that's a lot of my wage! I also pay a heck of a lot of income tax, and a 10% state consumption tax.

I feel like I no longer identify with my fellow Australians. It's not so much that the government is oppressing the people, the people are doing the oppressing.


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I have read extensively about New Hampshire politics and government. Every few months I get a passion to join the Free State Project in New Hampshire, but for the time being I have no way of obtaining that life goal. The immigration requirements are quite strenuous, so until I get my degree I have no option. Is it as difficult as I've heard to get an employment offer as an immigrant? I've heard that it's significantly harder to convince an employer to support your green card application than it would be for a US citizen to get the job.

As a result, I am planning a trip to New Hampshire for a few weeks in the NH fall/winter. The cold weather is the only unpleasant thing I can find about your great state, I adore hot weather. I figure there's not much point going in the summer/spring as that wouldn't be a test of the only potential downside.

What I expect of New Hampshire

  • I expect it to have a mostly functioning democracy on a local level. I want to get involved in local elections, perhaps even to run for local offices or the House someday.
  • I expect it to be cold. My expectations are as low as can be in this regard, I am expecting it to be about as cold as the house in The Shining.
  • I expect there to be a strong local tendency to oppose intervention in our lives. No seat belt/helmet/speed camera laws is absolutely astonishing to me, so I expect good things.
  • I expect the New Hampshire advantage to be a real thing which the people are interested in maintaining.
  • I expect to be able to enjoy my life without being weighed down by regulation in every area I enjoy. You can license ATVs to ride on the road, that's a start.
  • I expect to be able to open or concealed carry, and shoot without interference, and with the support of the public and police (within reason).
  • I expect it to be a "remote" place. I favor Cöos county for that reason. The more remote, the better.
  • I expect to own over 500 acres. This is a life goal of mine, but the more the better. I don't need farmable land, I prefer forest.
  • I expect there to be a substantive liberty movement there when I visit.
  • I expect that if I eventually gain residence, I won't be some lonely guy in a remote property: I expect that there will be FSP gatherings if I seek them out!
  • I expect that there will be something different to do outdoors in each season! I already own an ATV (Banshee 350cc twin 2 stroke), I will buy a snowmobile and horse when I get there.
  • I expect to be able to participate in Agorism!

 

Are any of my expectations outlandish? Are any of them certain to be fulfilled?


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Would anybody hypothetically be willing to let me stay with them for a few weeks sometime from September to February? Obviously I'm not asking for confirmation or something, just to know that there could potentially be that option there. I don't want to stay at some hotel, I want to live with an FSP participant who can show me around, preferably one on a large acreage and with a family. Naturally I'd pay my way: room and board, plus any expenses you may incur.

PS: I'm a nice, down to Earth person.

Thanks for reading my post  :)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2015, 12:48:47 pm by JoinOrDie »
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JoinOrDie

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2015, 01:22:35 am »

I am also considering Wyoming, Alaska, Arizona, and Nevada. People keep convincing me that NH has a peculiarly large tax burden on corporate and property tax.

In addition, what happens when Massholes move enmasse? How can liberty be maintained?

Am I being hysterical, or are these concerns legitimate?
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JoinOrDie

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2015, 01:51:22 am »

Also, 78,000 people migrated from Boston to NH from 2001 to 2006. How can the FSP possibly compete with that? Won't it just get worse at a slightly slower rate?
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JasonPSorens

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2015, 06:34:36 am »

All your expectations are reasonable, except that "a strong local tendency to oppose intervention" will vary by location. Near college towns and the capital city, the electorate is tilted strongly left, which means more intervention on economic and even some social issues. A lot of the state legislature is elderly and holds views consistent with such generations. Here, like everywhere, the struggle for liberty is continual. But we have lots of allies, and I have to say that I have not seen freedom eroded significantly in the last 5 years; overall, freedom has advanced here, even as it has fallen back in most other places. There have been big budget cuts, tax cuts, new school choice programs, relaxation of laws regulating everything from knives to micro- and nanobreweries, medical marijuana, and more. The only somewhat-significant loss we've had is a cell phone driving ban that passed last year. Opinions vary about how significant that kind of law is; I suppose there is a libertarian case in favor, though I oppose it.
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

JoinOrDie

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2015, 09:35:16 am »

All your expectations are reasonable, except that "a strong local tendency to oppose intervention" will vary by location. Near college towns and the capital city, the electorate is tilted strongly left, which means more intervention on economic and even some social issues. A lot of the state legislature is elderly and holds views consistent with such generations. Here, like everywhere, the struggle for liberty is continual. But we have lots of allies, and I have to say that I have not seen freedom eroded significantly in the last 5 years; overall, freedom has advanced here, even as it has fallen back in most other places. There have been big budget cuts, tax cuts, new school choice programs, relaxation of laws regulating everything from knives to micro- and nanobreweries, medical marijuana, and more. The only somewhat-significant loss we've had is a cell phone driving ban that passed last year. Opinions vary about how significant that kind of law is; I suppose there is a libertarian case in favor, though I oppose it.

I must admit I had not expected a reply from you personally. Thanks for your time.

I would say that I am strongly tilting in favor of the United States. It seems fairly unlikely that I will not migrate to somewhere in the US. It's just a question of where. New Hampshire seems nice, but as with most people, it's not my ideal climate. To put it into perspective, my city's average high in winter is as warm as NH's average high in summer. I'm willing to adapt to that, but it puts the burden of proof on NH's liberty to convince me!

On that account, its liberty credentials seem suspect, given 70,000 people from Greater Boston migrated to NH from 2001 to 2006 - how can the FSP do anything but slow the descent into Masshole-style tyranny by 20,000 people? Or are these people mostly those who dislike MA's over-government? Western alternatives have similar issues with migrants from CA, but they don't seem this serious.

As for the anti-cell phone legislation for drivers, we have that here too. It's disheartening that NH residents wouldn't feel opposed to that. I understand that liberty is a continual battle (it's refreshing that we agree on that), but that's exactly the sort of thing I had expected NH residents to oppose, along with seat belt laws, helmet laws, etc.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Above all else I'd be disappointed if I moved to New Hampshire and then it gradually became just another Masshole. I'm afraid of the urban sprawl, I like remote areas. If NH became populated by suburbs everywhere filled with statists, I'd cry :(

You are obviously dedicated to this cause Jason, do you feel these concerns are significant? Is the NH north likely to remain remote for the foreseeable future?
« Last Edit: June 02, 2015, 09:56:34 am by JoinOrDie »
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JasonPSorens

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2015, 08:16:53 pm »

The population is stagnant or even dropping in Coos County, so you certainly don't have to worry about remoteness there.

As to the political leanings of people moving in from Massachusetts, they're mostly Republicans. Hillsborough and Rockingham counties, which have the most transplants from Massachusetts, are also heavily Republican outside the big cities.
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

freedomroad

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2015, 08:23:39 pm »

Also, 78,000 people migrated from Boston to NH from 2001 to 2006. How can the FSP possibly compete with that? Won't it just get worse at a slightly slower rate?

Do you have any evidence?

Free State accounts for 26% of NH net population growth - See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20150228/AGGREGATION/150229194/1007/NEWS02#sthash.mmedeiQm.dpuf
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JoinOrDie

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2015, 09:26:24 pm »

The population is stagnant or even dropping in Coos County, so you certainly don't have to worry about remoteness there.

As to the political leanings of people moving in from Massachusetts, they're mostly Republicans. Hillsborough and Rockingham counties, which have the most transplants from Massachusetts, are also heavily Republican outside the big cities.

That's very relieving. Something I like about NH is that it doesn't have a "big" city which coerces the rest of the state, at least, not to the extent of other states. Hopefully the migrants from MA have an interest in retaining the New Hampshire advantage, and don't demand new infrastructure and the sort.

I'll continue to look into Coos county, perhaps Grafton.

Also, 78,000 people migrated from Boston to NH from 2001 to 2006. How can the FSP possibly compete with that? Won't it just get worse at a slightly slower rate?

Do you have any evidence?

Free State accounts for 26% of NH net population growth - See more at: http://www.unionleader.com/article/20150228/AGGREGATION/150229194/1007/NEWS02#sthash.mmedeiQm.dpuf

I read it online somewhere while doing research. I can't recall the source, but if you have better sources by all means.
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Bazil

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Re: Please Read: I want a new life in New Hampshire
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2015, 11:47:31 am »

I made the same assumption about people coming in from Boston that you did.  However Jason owned me with well sourced statistics on that one.  Apparently the majority of people who moved from Boston to NH over the last few decades did so because they couldn't stand the statism there anymore.

500 acres? That's a lot, in my area (southern NH) that'd probably cost you a million+, land value only.  For instance a house in my town that sits on over 500 acres of non-buildable forest land is going for a million and that's a price drop.  However it'll be a lot cheaper in northern NH and it'll most likely be all mountainous forest, with nothing but nature for miles.
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