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Author Topic: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH  (Read 8413 times)

marcelopg

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Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« on: August 07, 2013, 01:01:38 pm »

Ok, not impossible, but difficult.

I live a comfortable life in Brazil, me and my wife, but we are not truly free: we are suffocated with restrictive laws, high taxes (aprox. 40%), corruption, violence, etc.

And there is no movement to change it for the better, only for the worse: the population claims for more governmental intervention, for the next election there are no candidates thinking otherwise.

Because of all this, we decided that it is time to leave. And what better option than the Free State Project? But that won´t be an easy task. I elaborated a list of what I need to do to accomplish a successful move to New Hampshire. And I want your help, with comments and suggestions.

First, some background: both me and my wife are born in Brazil. We´re native portuguese speakers, but we learned english. I speak a little better than her. I need to improve specially my grammar and my writing. We have no children yet, but we´re trying to have the first one. We both work for the brazilian government.

I´m an economist, 33 years old. For the next years, I intend to pursue a masters dregree here and try to get a PhD in an american university. I should also improve my english skills while here in Brazil. With specialized knowledge, I intend to improve my odds of finding a sponsor of a working visa.

My wife is a civil engineer, 34, with a masters degree in sanitation. She she is already studying english and I think that pursuing a PhD in an american university would also be a good option for her. I just don´t know what would be the odds of we being accepted on the same one.

She has a sister that lives in Alabama, so moving there first may be easier, but as a libertarian, I´m really excited about the Free State Project. It will be no easy task, but we´re up to it.

Happy to be here,
Marcelo
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JasonPSorens

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2013, 02:16:32 pm »

Hi Marcelo - Welcome to the forum. Getting a postgrad degree in the U.S. can be a fairly straightforward way of getting into the U.S. If you land an academic job after graduation, you'll be able to acquire residency and citizenship. I have had grad students from abroad who've been able to do just this. Of course, finding an academic job in New Hampshire specifically will likely prove to be a challenge. But once you have legal residency in the U.S., you could always move to NH and find something else to do for work, if you want to make that decision.

So I agree that it's "mission difficult," but not "mission impossible." :)
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

Matt Clem

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2013, 07:08:51 pm »

Welcome to the forum! I'm not sure what exact school of economics you subscribe to, but as a fellow Econ major I must say if you appreciate the Austrian School that George Mason University is probably the most concentrated professors of that school have ever been. An excellent major choice for friends of Hayek.
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marcelopg

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2013, 10:56:29 pm »

Thanks for the replies. So probably getting a postgrad degree may be the easiest (or least difficult) way.

I really liked the tip about George Mason University. Do you know of more programs that have professors of Austrian School Economics?
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Matt Clem

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2013, 11:33:53 pm »

Chicago may have a few. I know there is a professor who is very coal in his defense of Austrian thinking at the University of New Orleans, although I cannot place his name.
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greap

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 06:34:03 pm »

Thanks for the replies. So probably getting a postgrad degree may be the easiest (or least difficult) way.

I really liked the tip about George Mason University. Do you know of more programs that have professors of Austrian School Economics?

You could always go down the Chicago route, free market ideas but without people pointing and laughing.
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mauricelacerda

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2014, 09:26:07 pm »

Hi guys, hi Marcelo! Nice to know there are other fellow Brazilians libertarians with plans to move to NH.

I'm a Brazilian an-cap libertarian and I am getting kind of desperate (and I think Marcelo and his wife are, too) with the direction my government is taking. Brazil has always been pretty statist, but things are escalating quickly with the Labor Party in power. I expect we'll be full Argentina in a couple of years, full Venezuela by the end of the decade, and full Cuba by 2025... :o :o :o

It's been a while I've been thinking of migrating to the US, but immigration laws are pretty tough, and I wouldn't want to do it illegally; well, not until my life and liberty depend on it. If Brazil go full Cuba, I expect I'll become a border-jumper, or a corpse...Canada and Australia are a bit less complicated, but I would prefer the US. When I heard of the FSP I thought: "dude, I'd move tomorrow if I could!".

I am a business administration graduate and corporate analyst, and my wife, a brilliant kidney doctor. I was wondering if there are any immigration lawyers among the supporters of Free State that could help us out.

Best regards,
Maurice
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b2b_dna

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2014, 06:38:10 am »

While I cannot speak of specific academic options, you should know that Boston, one of the world's most vibrant academic cities, is just about an hour by car from southern NH.  Now, Massachusetts may be full Cuba soon as well, but as part of a transition to NH, there can be many academic opportunities there.
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Caue

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2014, 03:49:55 pm »

Hey guys, Maurice, Marcelo,

I'm Caue, also from Brazil, and I've got the same will as you guys. 32 married with a wonder 33 journalist, who have some degrees and awards.

A self proclaimed brazilian entrepreneur wannabe who happens to be a programmer as well. I'm a peculiar kind of talent who have no deep specialization but can bring a lot of hard-to-measure-worth to a company, because I work hard and I work good. I'm a long run kind of guy.

I'm also a college dropout and, to make things a little worse, I've got my tourist visa request denied 3 times - all attempts to visit my family. My mother have a Green Card and is currently living and working in NH. After consulting with many specialists I've came to the conclusion she and my brother, who is a citizen and through whom my mother got her green card, are the main reasons I got my visa denied.

And I fear even if I ever found a job willing to get me an H1 I'd have even that denied.

This post also makes me sad. I came here through my mom's recommendation. She thinks you guys from the free state project are great. I was hoping I could find information or help on how I could make the move and live there, but I just saw 2 other guys in similar situation getting little to no information and far from any help.

I have applied for my own green card, through both of my family members, the first one in 2012. But today the best expectation I've got for this to work out is about 7 years from now. And, as much as it's almost sure it will come out eventually, there's always a risk it won't. So, it's not something I should wait for.

As for you guys, my brazilian correlates, I can only reaffirm what others have said. To move to USA there are basically 3 ways. Get married, get family or get lucky. In order from easier to harder. Family, as you see in my case, may actually make things worst. And "get lucky" means finding a job who'll sponsor you, in the majority of those cases. I've been trying to find one for a long time, and I'm actively seeking one right now, but even if you do have the highest specialized qualifications it still could be not enough.

Well, just my 2 cents. Thanks for reading.
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andersonnnunes

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Re: Mission Impossible - from Brazil to NH
« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2016, 06:30:03 pm »

I would really like to get information on how it was done, if any of you fellow Brazilians move to NH successfully.
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