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Author Topic: Visiting for house shopping  (Read 2705 times)

NH N8TV

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Visiting for house shopping
« on: July 18, 2013, 03:52:38 pm »

Hello all!

I will be flying into Manchester on Thursday, the 25th of July to look at a farm in Lisbon, NH.  I've made reservations at Thayers in Littleton.  If there's anyone in the area, I would love to meet up and chat.   

As a side note, if you know of any farms for sale in the area, I would love to take a look. 

Cheers,
~Mark
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KBCraig

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Re: Visiting for house shopping
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2013, 05:39:33 pm »

Welcome to the forum.

We're in Lancaster -- well, my wife and kids are, my hot unhappy ass is still in Texas.

If you're on Facebook, search for North Country Porcupines. There are several in the area, although they aren't super busy online. There's a couple in Bethlehem, another in Lisbon (or Sugar Hill or Franconia... they all run together right there), and some below the notch in Lincoln.

A non-FSP acquaintance just bought land in Lisbon near the Sugar Hill line and is busy building, for his move from Connecticut.
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NH N8TV

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Re: Visiting for house shopping
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 12:50:00 pm »

I'm actually in Texas right now!  We're down in Bay City, south of Houston.

I will check them out on FB.

The place I'm going to look at essentially has two houses on it; though one is unfinished inside.  I plan to finish it, should we buy the farm.  Knowing that many people want to come to NH, but might not be able to support their family upon arrival, I thought I would "rent" the other house out to FSP folks.  I put "rent" in quotations because I'm interested in people who want to learn/assist with a homestead style farm.  Essentially, you live on the farm, in exchange for helping with the farm work.

We sold our farm in WV to allow us to get to NH.  We milked Jersey cows, raised Gloucestershire Old Spot pigs, Scottish Highland cows, had free-range chickens, raised pastured meat chickens with Joel Salatins methods, had a huge garden that we canned/preserved, homeschooled (we have a 10 y/o and a 17 y/o), and lived a really simple existence.  The only down side, was we could never find farm help when we needed it.  I think that having "live-in" help would benefit us, and at least one like-minded family.

We hope to be in our new place in NH by Spring.  Are there any folks/families that might be interested?

Super short bio:  I'm a retired Navy pilot (44), my wife was a Director of Nursing (38).  We LOVE the outdoors, being self-sufficient and being free and hanging around similar people.

~Mark
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KBCraig

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Re: Visiting for house shopping
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2013, 02:57:32 am »

That's great, Mark!

We also have a 10yo and 17yo -- they're the youngest two of our five, and the 17yo turns 18 on Monday.  Our youngest has been unschooled his whole life; the others have had a mix of public and homeschooling, except the 22yo, who went traditional the whole way.

The good folks down at Bardo Farm have had a live/work program for some time now. I haven't visited them, but they have an annual camp/work/learn festival every summer. They have a good reputation among FSP friends.

Scottish Highland cattle are well suited to NH, as are Belted Galloways.  Miles Smith Farm grows the shaggy beasts down in Loudon, and Otokahe Farm raises the belted Scots up here in Jefferson. They're far from the only ones, but they're two I know of offhand with websites. Just this past Spring, there was a great cow-hunt in Lancaster for a missing championship Belted Galloway heifer who sought greener grass and went walkabout.  ;)

Single-focus farming is rare in NH.  Almost all farmers are diverse, growing whatever critters they grow, plus greenhouses for winter/spring veggies, and outdoor gardens for the short but intense outdoor growing season. Four legged critters, chickens, worms, manure, compost... it all works together.
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