Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: where to live  (Read 8480 times)

Eric Freerock

  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 104
  • Moving Summer 2013
Re: where to live
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2012, 12:39:34 pm »

Interesting, I had no idea there were speed limits, I've never heard of anyone getting in trouble for speeding on a snowmobile.  I've heard of DUI but not speeding.  Enforcement must be pretty rare.

dumbthumbs

  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 76
  • Viurem Iliures o Morirem
    • @dumbthumbs
Re: where to live
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2012, 03:05:19 pm »

In MN they had speed limits as well. But think they only really enforced them if they received complaints. My older cousin had a couple close calls almost hitting the trail groomer he did get a few tickets after that. I think the powers that be were on the look out for him after that lol.
Logged
“If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?”
-Frédéric Bastiat, The Law
“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world : My own Government, I can not be Silent.” -Martin Luther King Jr.

time4liberty

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 922
Re: where to live
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2012, 03:08:42 pm »

I hear Maine has no snowmobile speed limits (unless the land owner sets one), wheras NH does (even on private property). Another thing for pro-liberty reps to fix ...

NH has specific limits, according to RSA215-C:8, for certain specific situations:
Quote
(1) 10 miles per hour within 150 feet of any so-called bob-house, fishing shanty, or occupied fishing hole of another.
(2) 10 miles per hour on class I through VI highways when the snowmobile is being operated within the rights-of-way adjacent to such highways; town or city sidewalks; class IV, V, and VI highways approved for snowmobile operation; and bridges open for snowmobile operation.
(3) 10 miles per hour at trail junctions or parking lots, or when passing trail grooming equipment.
(4) 15 miles per hour on plowed roads on department of resources and economic development property open to snowmobile operation.
(5) 35 miles per hour on all trail connectors.
(6) 45 miles per hour when operating a snowmobile or OHRV on any approved snowmobile trail.
(there are some specific speeds set forth for specific lakes, elsewhere)

So, the general 45mph limit only applies on "approved snowmobile trails," which appears to be a governmental designation by the bureau of trails, so I don't know that it would apply to totally-private property; it seems like it would only apply to private property for which the owner has sought that designation.  Else, the speed limit is whatever is "reasonable and prudent" with "regard for actual and potential hazards," and that seems to be the only part that would apply to totally-private property.

Oh! Good to know!
Logged

John Edward Mercier

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6534
  • Native
Re: where to live
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2012, 06:22:06 pm »

There's plenty to do in all seasons.  The cold isn't really a big deal, you get used to the cold plus if you're properly clothed it doesn't really matter, if you're cold you're not wearing the right clothes.  You pretty much have skiing/snowboarding from November to May if you want it.  There are plenty of other winter activities out there to strike your fancy like ice skating, pond hockey, sledding (totally not just for kids), tubing, snow golf.  Hiking and camping opportunities are abound, there's 100s of miles of the Appalachian trail in VT, NH and ME , plus plenty of mountain biking and trail running opportunities.  Surface water such as lakes are clean and good for swimming, fishing, kayaking, canoeing, etc... There's rock climbing, mountain climbing.  Motor sports of all kinds.  NH,VT and ME have extensive snowmobile trail systems with 100s, probably over a 1000 miles of trail if you added it all up, most of those trails are also open to cross country skiing in the winter as well as human powered traffic in the non-winter months.
NH has about 7000 in itself. Maine probably close to 10,000. But Maine is cheaper.

I hear Maine has no snowmobile speed limits (unless the land owner sets one), wheras NH does (even on private property). Another thing for pro-liberty reps to fix ...
Not likely to happen.
Logged

John Edward Mercier

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6534
  • Native
Re: where to live
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2012, 06:24:18 pm »

MaineShark...
Private property, in this case, is either something you own or have specific written permission to be accessing.
Since it isn't covered by the collective insurance policy, the State (BoT) doesn't care.
Logged

time4liberty

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 922
Re: where to live
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2012, 11:37:46 pm »

There's plenty to do in all seasons.  The cold isn't really a big deal, you get used to the cold plus if you're properly clothed it doesn't really matter, if you're cold you're not wearing the right clothes.  You pretty much have skiing/snowboarding from November to May if you want it.  There are plenty of other winter activities out there to strike your fancy like ice skating, pond hockey, sledding (totally not just for kids), tubing, snow golf.  Hiking and camping opportunities are abound, there's 100s of miles of the Appalachian trail in VT, NH and ME , plus plenty of mountain biking and trail running opportunities.  Surface water such as lakes are clean and good for swimming, fishing, kayaking, canoeing, etc... There's rock climbing, mountain climbing.  Motor sports of all kinds.  NH,VT and ME have extensive snowmobile trail systems with 100s, probably over a 1000 miles of trail if you added it all up, most of those trails are also open to cross country skiing in the winter as well as human powered traffic in the non-winter months.
NH has about 7000 in itself. Maine probably close to 10,000. But Maine is cheaper.

I hear Maine has no snowmobile speed limits (unless the land owner sets one), wheras NH does (even on private property). Another thing for pro-liberty reps to fix ...
Not likely to happen.

Why not? It seems to me that each owner should have the right to set rules for the use of his/her property. Last I checked, Maine hadn't disappeared in a mushroom cloud of snowmobile debris.

The organizations handling the maintenance of each trail could set a limit. That would be reasonable as well.
Logged

John Edward Mercier

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6534
  • Native
Re: where to live
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2012, 02:00:07 pm »

Its come up before under both majorities. And never got worked on.
The last time that large scale speeding was seen, it was the various volunteer clubs that ended it.
They refused to groom.

Generally, they did set the limits.
The statute was largely written by their umbrella organization.
I don't think I've ever seen a landowner not defer to those speed limits except the SPNHF. They set a 25mph limit.

Logged

elkingrey

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 356
    • Daily Anarchist
Re: where to live
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2012, 10:35:55 pm »

Cold is something you get used to. I'm from Northern California and I love the cold weather here. I'll tell you what I hate though, 100 + degree summers in California. The heat is something you cannot escape. The cold you can just turn up your heater or add layers of clothing.

escapist_reborn

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 321
  • Liberating the world one graphic at a time!
    • Graphical Liberation Front
Re: where to live
« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2012, 06:46:48 pm »

Cold is something you get used to. I'm from Northern California and I love the cold weather here. I'll tell you what I hate though, 100 + degree summers in California. The heat is something you cannot escape. The cold you can just turn up your heater or add layers of clothing.


I concur. Having lived all around the world, including Scotland in the winter and right now in Arizona, I can say that cold is much easier to manage, for the above-mentioned reasons.
Logged
Joël Valenzuela<br />Chief Contrabandist, Graphical Liberation Front

Eric Freerock

  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 104
  • Moving Summer 2013
Re: where to live
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2012, 09:59:23 am »

Agree.  In the heat, once you're naked you got no where else to go.  In cold you can always put on more layers.
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up