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Author Topic: New Hampshire  (Read 249012 times)

craft_6

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Re:FSP/New Hampshire
« Reply #15 on: September 18, 2002, 01:15:38 pm »

The single biggest drawback to New Hampshire is the population.  According to the state data page, NH had 567,000 voters in 2000, compared to less than 300,000 in Alaska, Wyoming, North Dakota, and Vermont.  South Dakota and Delaware had just over 300,000.  I would think that the states with fewer voters would be much easier for 20,000 people to influence, especially if we're talking about almost twice as many current voters.  (This number should also be compared for the upcoming 2002 elections.)

Maine (647,000) is even worse, and Idaho (488,000) and Montana (411,000) are also high relative to the smallest states.
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Elizabeth

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Re:FSP/New Hampshire
« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2002, 03:39:55 pm »

Although I would love to move to NH, I agree that the population is a big problem.  For some reason, though, people seem to ignore that -- it consistently shows up highest in straw polls.  I suspect that NH will cross our upper pop threshhold before we move, and that's a very bad thing.
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mdw

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New Hampshire: General Debate
« Reply #17 on: October 01, 2002, 11:22:11 pm »

A Stark Choice for New Hampshire: Slow Death by Taxes Hikes, or Tax Sanity

26 September 2002

In New Hampshire?s 1st district, Jeb Bradley will oppose new taxes, but his opponent, Martha Fuller Clark, has a record of supporting tax increases

WASHINGTON ? In the coming Congressional elections, voters in New Hampshire?s 1st district have a crystal clear decision: Do they vote for a candidate committed to holding the line on taxes, or for the candidate who has embraced every new tax increase in recent years?

Jeb Bradley has signed Americans for Tax Reform?s ?Taxpayer Protection Pledge,? which commits a candidate to oppose any and all attempts to increase marginal income tax rates, or to eliminate any
exemptions unless matched dollar for dollar by rate cuts elsewhere. His opponent, Martha Fuller Clark, has refused to take that pledge, demonstrating a willingness to raise taxes. In addition, she has voted for, and even sponsored, new taxes on income, transportation, golf, and video rentals.

?Jeb Bradley is a friend of New Hampshire taxpayers,? said taxpayer advocate Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform. ?His promise not to raise taxes, and his record of strong opposition to a statewide property tax, show his commitment to low taxes and fiscal responsibility. It seems Martha Fuller Clark, on the other hand, has never met a tax she didn?t like!? Ms. Fuller Clark voted for the failed attempt to create a statewide income tax for the first time in New Hampshire history. She voted to apply a 5% tax on greens fees at New Hampshire golf courses, which would have cost New Hampshire golfers $3.5 million per year. And she personally sponsored two other tax
hikes ? allowing localities to increase the registration fees on all motor vehicles, and placing a tax on all video rentals across the state.

?Martha Fuller Clark is the New Hampshire taxpayer?s worst nightmare,? continued Norquist. ?She has a record of nickel-and-diming the people to fund trendy spending programs. Jeb Bradley has promised to oppose such taxes, and to look out for the interests of taxpayers.?


Americans for Tax Reform is a non-partisan coalition of taxpayers and taxpayer groups who oppose all federal and state tax increases. For more information or to arrange an interview please contact Jonathan Collegio or Paul Prososki at (202) 785-0266 or by email at jcollegio@atr.org or pprososki@atr.org.

--from http://www.atr.org/pressreleases/2002/092602pr.htm
« Last Edit: September 08, 2003, 09:52:12 pm by JasonPSorens »
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mdw

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #18 on: October 01, 2002, 11:28:09 pm »

With an ax in hand, Fernald pushes pledge to end property tax
By JAMES W. PINDELL

CONCORD, September 26 – Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Fernald today said the race for governor isn’t about an income tax, it’s about the property tax.

Fernald, on the grounds of the state capital dressed in jeans and a thick red shirt, took an ax in his hand and chopped a piece of white pine labeled “ax the property tax.”

“The voters need to realize that Craig Benson would increase property taxes while I will cut them in half,” Fernald said.

The latest of press conferences is the third of its kind in a week and the latest in a saga of between the pair of candidates, with each using charts and numbers to show how their education funding plan will work and their opponent’s doesn’t.

Today, though, Fernald said Benson wasn’t just using “fuzzy math," but rather “phony math.” Fernald said this should be expected from a “political neophyte.”

Pundits beginning on election night said this race would be seen as a statewide referendum on an income tax. Benson, the Republican, has said he is steadfastly against any state sales or income tax.

Earlier in the week, Benson held a power point presentation looking at the impact of recently imposed income taxes in other states.

Benson showed studies saying that in other states, the income tax level increased as well as spending.

In response to today’s conference, Benson continued to say that Fernald’s plan add up.

“Mark is talking out of both sides of his mouth. He has repeatedly said that he won’t increase spending, but then the next thing he does is call for more money for some program,” Benson's policy director, Keith Herman, said.

Fernald may have used an ax and wood, but he wasn’t the only one today using props. The Benson campaign handed out “Fernald Tax Calculators” to the press. The simple pocket calculators had only numbers and plus signs (and no subtraction or equal signs), implying that taxes will only go up.

Fernald has long promoted his own tax calculator on his website that allows potential voters to see how much money they will save under his education funding plan.

The issue of frugality was again brought up by Fernald when he asked the question: “who do voters want? A candidate who drove his car into the ground or a candidate who drove his business into the ground?

-- from http://www.politicsnh.com/
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"It is therefore the inhabitants themselves who permit, or, rather, bring about, their own subjection, since by ceasing to submit they would put an end to their servitude."
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mdw

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #19 on: October 01, 2002, 11:36:41 pm »

All of the above and other data on politicsnh.com is interesting because it provides some insight into the significance of the gubernatorial race underway in New Hampshire. Although there is an LP candidate running, the major parties are facing off over the issue of state taxation. The Republican candidate, Benson, is running on a platform of no new income or sales tax, while the Democrat, Fernald, has stated that he supports a statewide income tax. The outcome of this election will be an interesting indicator of the current politcal climate of the state, and will provide further current data on voter turnout, campaign expenditures, and regional breakdown of political alignment.

In some ways, the NH governor's race could re-affirm NH as the most popular FSP candidate state, or put it out of the running completely.

Regards,
mdw

FYI- Excellent breakdown of regional voter turnouts in NH at http://www.politicsnh.com/scala/index.shtml
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"It is therefore the inhabitants themselves who permit, or, rather, bring about, their own subjection, since by ceasing to submit they would put an end to their servitude."
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Victor VI

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2002, 12:06:27 am »



In some ways, the NH governor's race could re-affirm NH as the most popular FSP candidate state, or put it out of the running completely.

Regards,
mdw



I'm not sure I'd consider a Democratic win a definitive statement of unsuitablity for a Free State. You have to keep in mind that the recent Liberal leaning of the state is largely due to being invaded by their Liberal neighbors from Massachusettes.  The old-timers might actually appreciate the support of the FSP in holding the line. Being welcome  and having natural allies in a state is an advantage that might be difficult to quantify by the numbers.

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Joey

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2002, 04:49:00 pm »


Well, I'm watching the NH political scene as well, and I hope to God the liberals there don't vote themselves a state income tax.

But I've been called to New Hampshire in three years; I just hope I can afford a reasonable place to live and the like.


http://www.joeydauben.com
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Jacobus

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #22 on: October 02, 2002, 06:58:34 pm »

I just moved to New Hampshire a couple of weeks ago (Hanover / Lebanon area).  Even though this is one of the most liberal Democrat areas of the state (if not the most) I see a lot more signs for the Republican candidates than the Democrat candidates.  Which may or may not mean anything, but if this election cycle is seen as a contest of taxes vs. no taxes, it might.  

One contest worth watching is the Senatorial race of Shaheen vs. Sununu.  Shaheen was the governor and is very liberal, and I don't know much about Sununu, but Shaheen's advertisements to shmear him make him out to be an anarcho-capitalist.  I hear "He voted to provide tax havens in the Caribbeans..." and I think- is this supposed to be a bad thing?

I've voted once so far- in 2000 - voted straight Libertarian where I could and Republican where I could not.  I was a minarchist then and, spurred by the election season to think about political philosophy and ethics, became a free market anarchist.  Having absorbed some lewrockwell.com and other anarchist propaganda, I thought I would go no-vote thereafter.  But after thinking more on it, though I know voting by itself is not the path to liberty, I think it can still be useful.  I haven't registered to vote here yet, but I probably will.  My reverse in decision concerning voting was influenced by reading Spooner, which I would suggest for the rabidly anti-vote people.  
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JasonPSorens

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2002, 08:01:03 pm »

Yes, even when I was an anarchist, during college, I was never anti-voting.  I don't see the logical connection between anarchism and avoiding voting.  Spooner himself, as you point out, was not anti-voting, though he believed the ballots should be made public.  (Or perhaps he was just making a rhetorical point with this statement, that a social contract would be valid only if ballots had your signature and were made public?  It's been a while since I've read Spooner...)
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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2002, 08:14:19 pm »

Our LPNH gubernatorial candidate (http://www.babiarz.org) is doing extraordinarily well. He is being included in the televised debates, getting great press, and his message seems to be well-received.  

Here is a front-page article from the debate last night (it will be broadcast next week):

Gubernatorial hopefuls clash
over taxes, economic issues
By TOM FAHEY
State House Bureau Chief

DURHAM — Candidates for governor ended their day the way they began it yesterday: in a debate.

Republican Craig Benson, Democrat Mark Fernald and Libertarian John Babiarz debated the issues before a small audience and the cameras of New Hampshire Public Television last night. The debate will be aired on Oct. 9 at 7 p.m.

In a session that concentrated on economic issues, Fernald argued the state needs to change its tax system, Benson said the state needs to spend more efficiently, and Babiarz said state spending needs to be cut.

Fernald, an attorney and state senator from Sharon, said he blames the statewide property tax for the state’s problems with under-funded state services, development sprawl and a miserly approach to school funding. He favors an income tax to solve the state’s funding crisis.

He said lack of adequate funding leaves New Hampshire with “the only 19 towns in America that don’t have public kindergarten.” He said he considers K-12 education part of the state’s obligation to provide an adequate education to all children, and would phase it in over four years.

The state doesn’t need to raise any more money, he argued. It just needs to raise it more fairly.

Benson, wealthy co-founder of Cabletron Systems, said Fernald’s income tax idea will make it hard for small business to succeed, and will deter new businesses from moving into the state.

He said he wants to establish “opportunity regions” that will draw new businesses to areas of the state now hurting for jobs. He wants to diversify the state’s economic base of high technology jobs by adding biotechnology, pharmaceutical and financial service firms.

Benson said adding a new industrial base to the state’s economy will create jobs in depressed regional pockets, help New Hampshire college and high school graduates stay in the state to build their lives and diversify the state’s economy before another economic slowdown occurs.

He said he’d use his experience in the high tech field to boost the use of computer technology to make state government more efficient, both in the service it delivers and the cost to taxpayers.

Babiarz, a private businessman from Grafton, said state government has grown too big, with too many bureaucracies in place. Only by cutting the size of government can the state cut taxes, he said.

“We need to cut them for the sanity of taxpayers, because they’ve just about had it,” Babiarz said.

Fernald said that for most taxpayers, the income tax is the answer. Property taxes hit most heavily those who can afford it the least, he said.

“My grandmother pays 9 percent of her income to support her schools. I pay 3. And I suspect Mr. Benson pays less than 1 percent,” he said. “We’re not taxing the wealthy. We’re taxing the retirement income of many retirees.”

The three-man field touched on other issues as well: health care costs, changing the governor’s two-year term, the Second Amendment, environment, welfare reform, and gambling, but the exchanges on those topics were brief.

Babiarz, who thinks most decisions should be left to local government, included gambling as a local issue. It should not be handed over to a select group of special interests, he said.

Fernald said he is against expansion of gambling, saying “A lot of people see gambling as a magic bullet. But it’s not.”

Benson said he does not support gambling. He warned that while some predict it would bring $200 million in new revenue, it would be in the $50 million range because Massachusetts and other states would follow and their residents would no longer travel here to gamble.

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2002, 08:16:51 pm »

And another:
http://www4.fosters.com/election_2002/oct/02/nh_gov_1002b.asp

The ‘i word’ (income tax) debated at gubernatorial candidates forum
By DAN TUOHY

N.H. Statehouse Writer

DURHAM — Democrat Mark Fernald avoids saying the I word, as in "income" tax, because it is an unpopular plan that will lead to bigger state government, his Republican opponent said Tuesday.

But, Fernald countered, Craig Benson’s nonspecific school plan would preserve the statewide property tax and do nothing to cap an expected budget deficit.

Libertarian John Babiarz joined Benson’s criticism of Fernald’s income tax plan during a forum at the University of New Hampshire.

"We know politicians can’t control themselves," he said.

Babiarz said an income tax would lead to a "spending binge" like the use of the tobacco settlement money, which lawmakers have mostly deposited into the state’s operating budget instead of anti-smoking efforts.

The focus of the forum was on the state of the economy, but how New Hampshire pays for education was raised after nearly every question. And yet, the candidates noted the issue is as much about tax fairness.

Benson, the co-founder of Cabletron Systems, said businesses are in some cases getting taxed unfairly and people on fixed incomes have trouble paying their property taxes. Complicating things, state education grants are not getting into classrooms, but are in many cases used by communities for tax relief, Benson said.

Fernald said his income tax plan is the best because it is based on one’s ability to pay. The 4 percent income tax would cut total state property taxes in half, exempt primary homes up to a value of $250,000, and provide renters credits.

His plan would repeal the business enterprise tax, which was enacted in the early 1990s after Benson sued the state because he said his company was paying 7 percent of state business profits taxes at the time.

Benson denied having anything to do with the creation of the business enterprise tax. He had sued the state and withheld $12 million in business taxes, but he said he bears no responsibility for the tax levied on most small businesses, from law firms to entrepreneurs.

"It was clearly what you were attempting to do," Fernald said.

Fernald also claimed that Benson relies on rosy revenue forecasts for the next state budget for 2004-05. Benson said his estimates, based on legislative budget figures, assume a 5 percent increase in state revenues. He wants to limit spending to no more than 3 percent annually and take other steps necessary to balance the budget without new taxes.

"What we need to do is live within our means," Benson said.

The economic picture, however, may not be that clear, according to Ross Gittell, UNH professor of management, who asked the candidates questions. He noted New Hampshire’s economy usually lags behind the national economy and, as such, may experience additional revenue losses.

The candidates spoke of the need to continue land conservation efforts and banning the use of MTBE in New Hampshire.

Fernald said the state’s confrontation with problems of sprawl was due to the tax climate. Communities push for continued development, while pushing away from affordable housing and putting off overdue investments in local schools, according to Fernald.

"We have made children the enemy," he said.

Benson called for spreading economic prosperity north of Concord by expanding the use of technology in government and maximizing the use of public-private partnerships.

Babiarz said the state should invest more in long-distance learning and reduce burdensome government regulations for businesses. The candidates said the state must attract more health insurance providers to lower the cost of health care.

The forum was sponsored by the Whittemore School of Business and Economics, the New Hampshire Business and Industry Association, and New Hampshire Public Television.

N.H. Statehouse Writer Dan Tuohy can be reached at 226-3633, or dtuohy@fosters.com
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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2002, 12:44:26 am »


I can't believe Babiarz (spelling?) is getting on TV with the major party candidates.

But then again, the New Hampshire Union-Leader is, if I'm not mistaken, a very large conservative paper that seems favorable to Libertarians.

But it's good the three parties are duking it out. Liberal Democrats in New Hampshire? Hmm, never would have thought there would be a specific "area."

I could see more liberals down near the southern border...


Eh well.
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Jacobus

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Re:Election 2002 and Taxes in NH
« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2002, 08:40:46 am »

Quote
Hmm, never would have thought there would be a specific "area."


Usually, where there is a major college, the area is liberal.  Dartmouth College is in Hanover, and it is also on the Vermont border, so it is to be expected that it's liberal around here.
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Yes! Move to NH
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2002, 09:22:25 am »



Yes, indeed!  Move to New Hampshire.  We can use the help.  I believe we currently have around 25,000 NRA members.  We can use more.  Great state! I am a lifer.  Mountains, coastline, four seasons.  Lots of people who believe in "Live Free or Die."  

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Sons of Liberty

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Re:Yes! Move to NH
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2002, 06:13:25 pm »

 ;D

Zippotony:

I'm in NH too, moving here 2 years ago from PA.  I was quite surprised at the number of liberty-loving individuals I have met here since then.  Unfortunately, the high quality of life up here is also attracting the socialists from below the Iron Curtain (MA-NH Border), so we need more freedom-lovers to start moving in.  

Best regards,
SOL
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