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Author Topic: regional preferences  (Read 3610 times)

Jim1

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regional preferences
« on: September 17, 2002, 07:32:54 pm »

New Hampshire is far ahead of any one state, but 49% prefer a Western state; whereas, only 39% prefer a New England State.
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JasonPSorens

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2002, 08:15:46 pm »

Oh, you don't know what a can of worms you've opened up there! ;)  The Research Committee originally wanted to narrow states down to equal numbers of eastern and western states, but this was rejected in favor of an objective population limit.  I advise westerners to get together and focus on 2 or 3 states that they think are best.
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glen

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2002, 08:47:57 pm »

How about the tri-state free state? Montana, Wyoming, Idaho. As of this post we have 37% of the vote.

Also, all three states have the voter initiative and referendum process whereas the eastern states do not. The voter initiative and referendum process means that we can get less government faster with fewer FSP members and make the current (non FSP) government do most of the dirty work of downsizing.

In addition, it is one heck of a lot harder for the feds to keep track of what a triple redundant western free state group is up to than it would be in a single eastern state.
 ;D


« Last Edit: September 17, 2002, 09:00:12 pm by glen »
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Jim1

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2002, 01:30:02 pm »

On second thought, I don't think regional preferences matter unless they are more skewed because the first goal must be to establish one state - any state. If that state were New Hampshire, then perhaps the next state would be Montana.
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Jim1

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2002, 10:35:59 pm »

When I use the state calculator, New Hampsire always scores higher than I think it should. The reason I think is because it does not take into account my preference to live in a state with real mountains, moderate temperatures, more sun, and less humidity.
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JasonPSorens

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2002, 07:16:42 am »

Hey, NH has one mountain over 6000 ft! ;)
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

Jim1

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2002, 07:49:42 pm »

I have been to the White Mountains in New Hampsire, and they are great for hikers and campers like myself. In fact, if I had not been to the White Mountains already, I would not be willing to move to New Hampshire.

However, I have experienced the mountains of Kentucky and Virginia all my life, so more mountains like those seem ordinary compared to the Rockies, Cascades, Sierras, and Olympic Mountains.

I recommend visiting all of these.
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freedomroad

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2002, 02:06:54 am »

New Hampshire is far ahead of any one state, but 49% prefer a Western state; whereas, only 39% prefer a New England State.

The East has high taxes, more restrictive gun laws, more restrictive fire works laws, more restrictive homeschool laws, more restrictive driver's L laws, more restricitve ballot I laws, and more restrictive traffic laws (not to mention traffic cameras).

Not only does the West have greater legal freedom but the West has greater personal freedom.  With more open spaces the law is less likely to breath down your throat and the air is more likely to be clean.  The West has open skies, mts, big national parks, and plenty of rivers (ME also has plenty of rivers).
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Robert H.

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2002, 02:35:03 am »

I'd definitely prefer to depart the statist east coast for more open, liberty-friendly country.  There are still some areas of the east coast that are more liberty-friendly, but their political influence is continually being marginalized.  And I expect that population growth and urban sprawl will marginalize them further as time passes.

The western states have a much greater legacy of rejecting statism (with the exception of farm subsidies), and they're not as susceptible to sprawl from more liberal metropolitan areas.  With less influx, and a more solid liberty-friendly foundation, these states are relatively stable platforms upon which to build a long-term agenda.

And it's not as if you have to choose between big cities and living in a sleeping bag on the mesa here either.  There are urban centers out west that can offer pretty much anything you're accustomed to, as long as it's not Carnegie Hall or beltway traffic jams.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2002, 02:36:02 am by Robert Hawes »
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freedomroad

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2002, 01:24:07 pm »

Please don't get hung up on stuff that the Free State activists can help the locals get changed.  
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The East has high taxes, more restrictive gun laws, more restrictive fire works laws, more restrictive homeschool laws, more restrictive driver's L laws, more restrictive ballot I laws, and more restrictive traffic laws (not to mention traffic cameras).
Also please do not paint the entirety of northern New England with the same brush. The world in the northern half of those three candidate states is entirely, and I mean entirely, different from that in the southern portions. A friend and I spent a long 4-day weekend fishing on and camping beside lakes in the upper Penobscot and had nobody else around. You can get as lost and far from the madding crowds in the north woods than you can most anywhere out west.

I've spent plenty of time in upstate VT and NY.  A lot of people tend to be more enviromentally friendly up there.  The same is true for ME.  It would be OK if the people were friendly to the enviroment, I also like the enviroment.  However, the government makes recycle taxes.  In ME and VT lots of beverages and the like are taxed heavy on the front end and if you return the bottles you get some of the tax back.  NH may be like this but I have never been there so I do not know.  Some of the tax goes to government spending while even more of it goes down the government blackhole that the programs create.

Upstate VT, NH, and ME are very cold. These are cold, cold places.  MT might have some cold places but the northern most areas on New England compare in weather to parts of AK.  Please, remember how cold these places are.  DE, ID, WY, and MT have much better (i.e. warmer) weather.
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PongGod

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2002, 01:50:24 pm »

Upstate VT, NH, and ME are very cold. These are cold, cold places.  MT might have some cold places but the northern most areas on New England compare in weather to parts of AK.  Please, remember how cold these places are.  DE, ID, WY, and MT have much better (i.e. warmer) weather.

I can't say from experience (since I haven't been to any of the states you mention), but are Wyoming and Montana *really* warmer than VT and NH?  I'm finding it hard to imagine much of a difference.  Perhaps those western states are less humid which, at equal temperatures, would not *feel* as cold.
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heyerstandards

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2002, 02:09:20 pm »

There is something to be said for finding a state in the northeast - the cradle of the New America. But the best history is yet to be written; no sense being sentimental.

I don't think I could get used to everything being brown and dry like it is out west..  I prefer the verdant pastures of Iowa, but I'm out of luck on the FSP vote.  ::)


Stop the speculating on the tempuratures. Check out weather.com.
Manchester, NH has an avg low January temp of 5 F; July high of 82 F.
 Helena, MT, at a higher latitude, has  an avg low January temp of 10 F; July high of 83 F.
Cheyenne, WY, has  an avg low January temp of 15 F; July high of 82 F.


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freedomroad

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #12 on: November 08, 2002, 03:30:13 pm »

There is something to be said for finding a state in the northeast - the cradle of the New America. But the best history is yet to be written; no sense being sentimental.

I don't think I could get used to everything being brown and dry like it is out west..  I prefer the verdant pastures of Iowa, but I'm out of luck on the FSP vote.  ::)


Stop the speculating on the tempuratures. Check out weather.com.
Manchester, NH has an avg low January temp of 5 F; July high of 82 F.
 Helena, MT, at a higher latitude, has  an avg low January temp of 10 F; July high of 83 F.
Cheyenne, WY, has  an avg low January temp of 15 F; July high of 82 F.




I've checked out the weather.

DE is the best state if you want cool summers and warm  winters.  ID and WY are next in line.  If you also want areas with a dry climate then ID and WY are the best states.

Almost anywway you cut it DE, ID, and WY are best for weather reasons.  MT is better than the rest of the states.
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Robert H.

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Re:regional preferences
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2003, 04:34:13 pm »

They're involved even more than New Hampshire voters are.

Surely not!   :o ;D

Maine does have the initiative and referendum, and, I believe, some degree of term limits as well - all advantages in working around stubborn, irresponsive, or enormous legislatures.
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