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Author Topic: Adjusting to NH cost of living  (Read 3739 times)

Doula Hilary

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Adjusting to NH cost of living
« on: February 13, 2012, 03:22:01 pm »

My husband and I have been dreaming of joining the FSP and moving from Central Florida to South NH for about a year now.  About a month ago we had  a breakthrough:  his cousin in Boston said the company he works for, which is out of Nashua, is hiring!  And he is qualified!  We decided if it's a big enough increase in pay, we'll jump on it.  It turns out it's almost double!  Hooray!  He put in a resume and I started searching craigslist and NNREN for housing for our family of four... 

And find out that rent is double what we pay here!  So, while we thought we would be moving up financially, it's looking more like we will be remaining stationary, stuck under the poverty line.  Trading higher wages for higher rent and high electric bills from running the A/C 9 months out of the year to high gas bills from running the heat.  Hopes dashed, disheartened, we had a serious discussion about how badly we want this.  The consensus is:  badly enough. 

The possible solutions, as we see it are to;
a) downgrade from renting a 3 bedroom/2 bath 1700 sqft single family home to renting a 2 bedroom/1 bath 700-800 square foot apartment;
b) Rent a comparable house for about $1500-$1700 and apply for section 8 possibly (would like more information about whether this is even possible as a non-resident), which we disagree with politically;
or c) Rent a comparable house and find a roommate to live with us and our two small children.  We know of no one in our area who is even remotely interested in moving. 

I'd like to hear from others regarding the cost of living in NH, creative ways around it, encouragement, help of any sort!  Thanks!
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JasonPSorens

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2012, 03:34:56 pm »

One thing to consider is that while the cost of housing is fairly high in NH, that does not generally carry over into other necessaries of life. Housing in NH is nearly double what it is where I live as well, but groceries are about the same, and restaurants are just slightly more expensive. Gas is cheaper. Then add in the lower taxes. Check out Kiplinger's Metro Area Cost of Living Index:
http://www.kiplinger.com/tools/bestcities_sort/
Manchester-Nashua is 121% of the national average, but that's hardly double. Orlando-Kissimmee is 97%.
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Porcupine Realtor

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2012, 04:29:48 pm »

A decent apartment in Nashua rents for around $900-1000 for a 2BR unit.
A single family, detached home within 20 minutes of Nashua will probably run you about $1500/month or more.

Almost everyone who has moved here with FSP has made some financial sacrifices to do so, but almost to a person they will tell you it was worth it. If you truly want to help find Liberty in Our Lifetime, this is the last, best hope.

You can search for rentals or properties for sale at my website www.porcupinerealtor.com.

I have a 2 BR condo for rent in Goffstown, about 25 minutes from Nashua, for $1,050/month + utilities.  Manchester, would be $50-100 cheaper for something comparable.  Manchester is less pricey than Nashua for rents, but you'd have more of a commute each day (about 20 minutes more, depending on locations).

Good luck; we hope you make it here.
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freedomroad

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2012, 04:36:54 pm »

My husband and I have been dreaming of joining the FSP and moving from Central Florida to South NH for about a year now.  About a month ago we had  a breakthrough:  his cousin in Boston said the company he works for, which is out of Nashua, is hiring!  And he is qualified!  We decided if it's a big enough increase in pay, we'll jump on it.  It turns out it's almost double!  Hooray!  He put in a resume and I started searching craigslist and NNREN for housing for our family of four...  
Welcome to the forum!

Quote
a) downgrade from renting a 3 bedroom/2 bath 1700 sqft single family home to renting a 2 bedroom/1 bath 700-800 square foot apartment;

You can get 3 bedroom apartments in Manchester for $800 to $1200 all day long.  It is common for frugal people to work in a town and then live in another, less expensive town.  Some of the people that work in Nashua live in the near-by places that are less expensive, like Manchester.  Some of the people that work in northern MA live in Nashua.  Unfortunately, since you don't live in NH and have a lot of connections here, you don't have the same ability to search for inexpensive rents here as the people that live here.  Once you get to NH, you should be able to find a place for less.  Perhaps you start with a 3 bedroom apartment for $1150 but once you get here you find a 3 bedroom for $950 and move into it once your current lease ends.

Quote
or c) Rent a comparable house and find a roommate to live with us and our two small children.

That should be easy to do.  You can use craigslist or roommates.com
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 04:40:08 pm by LoveAndPeace »
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rossby

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2012, 04:57:36 pm »

My husband and I have been dreaming of joining the FSP and moving from Central Florida to South NH for about a year now.  About a month ago we had  a breakthrough:  his cousin in Boston said the company he works for, which is out of Nashua, is hiring!  And he is qualified!  We decided if it's a big enough increase in pay, we'll jump on it.  It turns out it's almost double!  Hooray!  He put in a resume and I started searching craigslist and NNREN for housing for our family of four...  

And find out that rent is double what we pay here!  So, while we thought we would be moving up financially, it's looking more like we will be remaining stationary, stuck under the poverty line.  Trading higher wages for higher rent and high electric bills from running the A/C 9 months out of the year to high gas bills from running the heat.  Hopes dashed, disheartened, we had a serious discussion about how badly we want this.  The consensus is:  badly enough.  

The possible solutions, as we see it are to;
a) downgrade from renting a 3 bedroom/2 bath 1700 sqft single family home to renting a 2 bedroom/1 bath 700-800 square foot apartment;
b) Rent a comparable house for about $1500-$1700 and apply for section 8 possibly (would like more information about whether this is even possible as a non-resident), which we disagree with politically;
or c) Rent a comparable house and find a roommate to live with us and our two small children.  We know of no one in our area who is even remotely interested in moving.  

I'd like to hear from others regarding the cost of living in NH, creative ways around it, encouragement, help of any sort!  Thanks!

... the rents really aren't terrible. Frankly, I really hadn't noticed them being much higher than other places I've lived. I wouldn't let it discourage you. Once you're actually here, it's a lot easier to find the "deals". But if you're stuck hunting on apartments.com or whatever, it's going to look high. And especially so the further south you go.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2012, 05:42:35 pm by B.D. Ross »
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MaineShark

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2012, 09:08:27 pm »

Trading higher wages for higher rent and high electric bills from running the A/C 9 months out of the year to high gas bills from running the heat.

The biggest difference between A/C and heat?  A/C almost exclusively operates on electricity.  Heat can come from a variety of sources.  Wood, for example, is an inexpensive way to heat.

You could spend $6k heating a house of that size, using propane.  You could spend $1k heating a house of that size, using wood.  So look for houses with woodstoves...

Edit: Just to note, since someone said it was unclear, those were figures for a season, not for a month.

The possible solutions, as we see it are to;
a) downgrade from renting a 3 bedroom/2 bath 1700 sqft single family home to renting a 2 bedroom/1 bath 700-800 square foot apartment;
b) Rent a comparable house for about $1500-$1700...

As others have noted, you should be able to find a house like that for a lot less, if you are willing to live outside the city.

Try CraigsList for an idea of what's available, as well.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2012, 08:47:51 am by MaineShark »
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Bazil

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2012, 12:32:06 am »

I rented a 3br house walking distance from downtown Nashua for $1200 a month (I know it's now rented though).  It was in a neighborhood called Little Florida.  I think it's a hidden gem of an area near downtown.  When most people think of housing near downtown they think of the Tree Streets or French Hill.  Avoid renting in those areas.  You should be able to live comfortably on about 45k a year in Nashua without having to live in a questionable place.  Look on Craigslist for places.
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SeaSpray

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #7 on: February 14, 2012, 10:19:13 pm »

Where in Fl are you? My husband and I are down near Melbourne, though I grew up near Ocala. We're moving up in March and making a ton of sacrifices to do so.
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Porcsmouth

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2012, 10:05:00 pm »

Welcome home, Floridians! Aside from all the great advice above, remember: you get what you pay for!
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shaywann1

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2012, 07:21:57 am »

My wife and I moved up in December and we noticed our monthly expenses increased about $150.  We live in a 2 bdrm apt in Franklin. Our apt here is about 1050sf compared to the 700sf apt we had in NC.  Our rent is $750 here compared to $450 in NC (although our rent was based on my Mother-in-laws lease when she passed) and our utilities here are $163 for gas/elect while the elect in NC was almost $300 per month.  So, basically in depends on where you want to live you can find something to meet your needs. Welcome home.
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greap

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Re: Adjusting to NH cost of living
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2012, 09:22:17 am »

The possible solutions, as we see it are to;
a) downgrade from renting a 3 bedroom/2 bath 1700 sqft single family home to renting a 2 bedroom/1 bath 700-800 square foot apartment;
b) Rent a comparable house for about $1500-$1700 and apply for section 8 possibly (would like more information about whether this is even possible as a non-resident), which we disagree with politically;
or c) Rent a comparable house and find a roommate to live with us and our two small children.  We know of no one in our area who is even remotely interested in moving. 

You forgot option d, move in to a two bedroom apartment when you get here and then start searching for something more permanent. A few of us live here which doesn't have a fixed term lease (you just provide 30 days notice and you can move out) which would give you the option of looking on the ground.

If you can find the deposit and have the credit to do so buying is also an option, my wife and I have been looking at some places in west Nashua recently and some of the properties are going for 50% of their assessed value.
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