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Author Topic: Gardens  (Read 3907 times)

Vegemighty

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Gardens
« on: October 15, 2011, 09:15:15 pm »

So hey all. I think maybe New Hampshire would be a good place to throw down my libertarian roots when I decide to settle down. But I enjoy gardening, beekeeping and such stuff. It is a great dream for me to be able to grow or hunt all my food. New Hampshire is quite cold though. Any gardeneres up there want to tell me what its like keeping a garden?
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time4liberty

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2011, 09:55:53 pm »

So hey all. I think maybe New Hampshire would be a good place to throw down my libertarian roots when I decide to settle down. But I enjoy gardening, beekeeping and such stuff. It is a great dream for me to be able to grow or hunt all my food. New Hampshire is quite cold though. Any gardeneres up there want to tell me what its like keeping a garden?

I grew up keeping a garden, and hope to have one again soon, after we buy a house. Most vegetables grow very well in NH. For our part, we usually grew parsley, chives, carrots, cherry tomatoes, corn, cukes, beans, and lots of basil, for pesto, and almost always had bumper crops. We tried cantaloupe one time, and it didn't go so well, but that might have just been our soil, or the fact that the garden was usually shaded.

Here's a NH planting guide: http://www.nhgardensolutions.com/A_Room_Full_Of_Secrets/Veggies/NH_Vegetable_Planting_Guide.pdf

If gardening is a priority for you, prefer land with a fairly clear view to the south. You can do fine with north facing land -- ours was on the north side of a large hill -- but you'll get an extra week or two if it's facing south.

Also, berries grow like crazy here (strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries) -- wild too, except for the strawberries.The apples are fantastic -- orchards are everywhere, with endless varieties. I've seen a couple peach orchards too -- the peaches aren't bad, but they're not as good as southern ones.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2011, 10:11:18 pm by time4liberty »
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pittsfieldmom

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2011, 06:08:13 pm »

I lived in the Carolinas for 20 years and found gardening in NH much easier.  Weeding is a breeze and doesn't have to be done near as often as down south.  It is very easy to keep your garden free of weeds.  Manure and mulch are easy to find cheap.  The biggest difference will be the growing season is about 1 month (each end) different from the Carolinas, last frost to first frost.  However we don't have the blistering heat in July and August that makes even the hardiest plants wither.  So you don't lose plants in August they continue on until Oct. You NEED to start indoors, it's not a preference.  They need the additional start time because losing a month on both ends is too short for a nice big harvest.  So start indoors, less weeding and watering (we get good rainfall) and enjoy a good harvest.  I'm sure some things won't grow well up here but most do and I have several friends who continue the season with hot houses or covered rows. 
I'm loving New England especially the gardening.
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freedomroad

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2011, 01:44:43 pm »

Fun facts about NH and potatoes

The first potato planted in the United States was at Londonderry Common Field in 1719.
http://www.50states.com/facts/newhamp.htm

ME is the #1 potato grower east of the MS River.

According to wikipedia, Potatoes are Canada's most important vegetable crop.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potato#US_and_Canada

Here are a whole bunch of interactive NH plant related maps that may be of some use
http://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-new-hampshire-plant-maps-zone-hardiness-map.php
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agjennings

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2011, 08:46:56 am »

Thanks for the info.  Are there any gardening groups that also have FSP members?  I would like to pick the brains of local gardeners once I move and if we can talk FSP and gardening at the same time, that would be awesome!
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Alex Libman

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2011, 02:46:06 pm »

Great info, LoveAndPeace.  Potatoes are definitely the most popular thing to grow, but that means an agorist market would have them at surplus, and they provide very few nutrients except starch...

I've always wanted to try the "Three Sisters" method of agriculture, combining corn and beans, though I'd consider replacing squash with something else.  Corn and other grains are more nutritious than potatoes, and dried beans are the ultimate high-protein survivalist staple!

A lot of edible plants look great in addition to being cold-tolerant and very nutritious - like my favorite, kale!

And of course edible hemp, which can produce better protein per acre than soy, especially in a greenhouse!

(EDIT:  note:  my knowledge of agriculture is almost entirely theoretical.)
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 06:04:56 pm by Alex Libman »
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2011, 03:35:22 pm »

Since I currently use the Three Sisters... any idea on what other than squash might be worth a try?
I definately can't say that the yields have been excellent for the inputs.
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Alex Libman

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2011, 06:28:01 pm »

I've heard a number of squash alternatives.  The most common one seems to be cucumbers (a close relative), and in Mexico they've traditionally used tomatoes.  That's not a significant nutritional benefit over squash, but they can be pickled and go better with other things you can grow: potatoes with pickles, bean and tomato salad, bean and tomato paste sandwich, pasta sauce, etc.

I just came across this interesting idea:

Quote
I might just use buckwheat instead of squash for a ground cover.  Stays short enough to not shade the corn and beans, easier to walk through in the middle of the season, amazing bee fodder, and comes up with huge leaves in 12 hours.

Buckwheat is awesome!  And it mentions the fourth sister - honey.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 06:32:10 pm by Alex Libman »
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2011, 12:20:05 am »

Tomatoes would be a no... they share a certain blight with corn.
Cucumbers is interesting... but I generally vine them vertically, and would need to make sure they don't interfere with the beans.

The squash and bean yields have been excellent, but the corn last season had immature ears. I thought it may have been the weather (heavy rains)... but maybe a plant rotation would help.


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Alex Libman

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2011, 07:02:57 am »

From my point of view, it's all about maximizing the digestible protein per area of land, so in addition to legumes one would need another plant type that benefits from the nitrogen and provides a high ratio of methionine.  An agorist movement that can utilize small gardens to feed itself (or even produce a food surplus) is a lot stronger than one that needs to import food from outside of the agorist economy.  (The word "agorism" might mean different things to different people, but all I mean in this case is doing business with other libertarians.)  The production of animal protein has a number of downsides (ex. Brian Travis raid), and is also very nutritionally inefficient, so the more plant protein one can grow (and store, and make palatable) the better.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2011, 07:09:42 am by Alex Libman »
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time4liberty

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2011, 10:35:27 pm »

You're completely right about food Alex. Once an agorist movement can cover food, it becomes feasible to be almost entirely independent. It seems like the tough part is gettig cheap staples -- bread, pasta, etc -- probably because they are generally made most efficiently with expensive machinery. I would love to do business in almost nothing but silver, with almost noone but liberty loving people, someday.
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Alex Libman

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Re: Gardens
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2011, 05:18:17 pm »

From what I can foresee, machinery doesn't cost all that much in the grand scheme of things, especially if it is rented / time-shared among multiple farms (which I mean in a purely capitalistic value-for-value sense).  Also machinery doesn't necessarily make you more dependent on the state, or more subject to its regulations the way animal farming does.  But I think there are many ways to reduce the need for machinery in agriculture, especially the approach to agriculture that is optimized for agorism in NH.

A lot of things about the modern American lifestyle make very little logical sense, especially since the advent of the Internet reduced the relative benefits of living in cities.  People spend lots of time and money to maintain their lawns and decorative bushes / trees / flowers that produce zero nutritional value.  People use machines to save themselves of physical labor, and then they drive to the gym lest they become fat and lose decades off their life expectancy.  (And the advent of MP3 players makes agricultural work a lot less boring than it used to be!)  People get their produce from a supermarket instead of a local greenhouse, which wouldn't require much more space and improve quality / freshness greatly.  People process the hell out of their grains, thus reducing their fiber, and then take fiber supplements or go crazy for products that are marketed as high fiber.  I mean, some food processing makes very little economic sense to me - what exactly makes Wheaties or pasta better than wheatberries [2] or buckwheat groats?  It's just a matter of habit...

By adjusting to more rational habits in selecting / growing / distributing / preserving / preparing food, an agorist community can achieve tremendous benefits, both in terms of food security as well as health!
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