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Author Topic: Property Tax  (Read 17265 times)

John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2011, 09:55:01 pm »

Not to mention that exemptions transfer tax to others.
If NH removed all exemptions/etc., it would actually act as a rate cap.
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LoveFreedomAndLiberty

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2011, 04:31:13 pm »

I prefer no taxes for anyone. 

However, if I HAD to choose, I would rather pay a fixed sales tax than a property tax.  Property/Shelter seems more like necessity and a t.v. seems more like a choice.  I have to have shelter (so I must pay property tax) but I don't have to buy a t.v.(pay sales tax).

Just my opinion.
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MaineShark

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2011, 05:15:07 pm »

However, if I HAD to choose, I would rather pay a fixed sales tax than a property tax.  Property/Shelter seems more like necessity and a t.v. seems more like a choice.  I have to have shelter (so I must pay property tax) but I don't have to buy a t.v.(pay sales tax).

On the flip side, a sales tax is much more of an imposition, from an "interference in folks' lives" standpoint.

Right now, if I want to go into business, I just hang out a sign and I'm able to move forward.  If there were a sales tax, every single business would have to register with the State, have to report all sales, be subject to audits to make sure that they are in compliance, etc.  It would spell the end of most small businesses in NH.  We'd be left with little other than the big corporate businesses.

A property tax offers the least level of interference in the lives of the taxpayers.  The value of the property really isn't any secret.  But, the issues that you noted, also apply.

All taxes are bad ideas, of course.  Different schemes have different sets of drawbacks.

Joe
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LoveFreedomAndLiberty

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2011, 05:44:22 pm »

I was only looking at the issue on a personal level and not a business level.  It is hard for me to wrap my head around paying thousands of dollars in property taxes just to continue to live in a house/on property.  I can see why it would be a real headache and problem for business owners from what you said above.  No taxes is best, but I am curious about how realistic no taxes will ever be in my lifetime.

When I think about paying $10,000 annually in property tax.....  It just seems like a lot to come up with for some families/people.  What if someone only makes minimum wage?
« Last Edit: August 04, 2011, 05:51:43 pm by LoveFreedomAndLiberty »
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MaineShark

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2011, 06:00:55 pm »

The number I've heard is approximately $2500 per capita.

Most folks proposing flat sales taxes tend to propose taxes in the 10-15% range.  So, someone spending $17k-25k per year would equal the property tax in NH.

Since property taxes are actually paid as a lump sum, they are easier to get folks worked-up about, in trying to keep them down.  Sales taxes are a few cents or a few dollars at a time, many times over, so they sneak under the public consciousness, and small changes in the tax rate are not met with as much opposition.

Last ballot I saw, on the other hand, actually listed what impact each spending item would have on the tax rate.  Eg, "if this item passes, you will have to pay $2 more per thousand next year."  Makes it much easier to keep spending relatively in-check.

We had a warrant article, here in Grafton, to have the tax bills delivered a week before the town election.  That would have been fun...

Joe
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LoveFreedomAndLiberty

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2011, 06:25:57 pm »

Some families might grow their own food, or not purchase non-essential items keeping their sales tax to a minimum.  So, maybe they might only pay a few hundred dollars in sales tax annually.  I guess it seems easier to come up with $7 in sales tax (on a $70 purchase) each time someone chooses to make a purchase than $10,000 in a lump sum.

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WendellBerry

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #21 on: August 04, 2011, 07:47:02 pm »

Quote
The value of the property really isn't any secret.

A tax solely on locational value would be the best because it would be the least intrusive  - no one has to enter any buildings.

No one would be punished for their efforts...locational value is socially created - by definition, not part of the locational owner's efforts.
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ny2nh

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2011, 07:47:21 pm »

You can see the various assessments on properties in these towns at http://www.visionappraisal.com/databases/nh/index.htm

Then you can see the total property tax per $1000 of assessed value here: http://www.nh.gov/revenue/munc_prop/2010PropertyTaxRatesRelatedData.htm


$10,000 in property taxes IS a lot - I agree. But I am not sure you would have an assessment of $500,000 either.
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Trenks

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2011, 09:40:11 pm »

Why don't we just build a monastery?
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MaineShark

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #24 on: August 04, 2011, 09:46:49 pm »

Some families might grow their own food, or not purchase non-essential items keeping their sales tax to a minimum.  So, maybe they might only pay a few hundred dollars in sales tax annually.  I guess it seems easier to come up with $7 in sales tax (on a $70 purchase) each time someone chooses to make a purchase than $10,000 in a lump sum.

Indeed.  Making it easy to pay taxes, however, is a sure way to get higher and higher taxes.  The reason NH is at the bottom in overall tax burden, is because the largest of the taxes here is a difficult tax to pay, so folks tend not to support higher taxes.

Quote
The value of the property really isn't any secret.
A tax solely on locational value would be the best because it would be the least intrusive  - no one has to enter any buildings.

No one would be punished for their efforts...locational value is socially created - by definition, not part of the locational owner's efforts.

I've no interest in your flawed philosophy, but as a practical matter, I would agree that a tax on the land value, alone, would be less intrusive.  I would support that change, as it would enhance privacy.

Joe
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WendellBerry

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #25 on: August 05, 2011, 05:41:12 am »

Quote
I would agree that a tax on the land value, alone, would be less intrusive.  I would support that change, as it would enhance privacy.

good to hear...
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Pat McCotter

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2011, 10:36:48 am »

Some families might grow their own food, or not purchase non-essential items keeping their sales tax to a minimum.  So, maybe they might only pay a few hundred dollars in sales tax annually.  I guess it seems easier to come up with $7 in sales tax (on a $70 purchase) each time someone chooses to make a purchase than $10,000 in a lump sum.

Indeed.  Making it easy to pay taxes, however, is a sure way to get higher and higher taxes.  The reason NH is at the bottom in overall tax burden, is because the largest of the taxes here is a difficult tax to pay, so folks tend not to support higher taxes.

...
Joe

When it comes to property taxes, the emphasis should be on reducing spending, not taxes. What the town meeting decides to spend is what determines the needed tax revenue.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2011, 01:11:41 pm »

Actually its four parts... and its most likely the school district rate that will be the highest.
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Pat McCotter

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #28 on: August 05, 2011, 05:32:29 pm »

Actually its four parts... and its most likely the school district rate that will be the highest.


Two are town and school. What are the other two?
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Porcupine Realtor

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Re: Property Tax
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2011, 10:20:32 pm »

Other two are county and state IIRC. They are minimal compared to school and town budgets.
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