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Author Topic: Yet MORE NH Media Coverage  (Read 26999 times)

Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2003, 07:32:41 pm »

Here is the text of the Valley News article:

Today's article by Jim Kenyon in the Valley News marks the third piece (one prior article and one prior editorial) the Valley News has published on the FSP.

Jim interviewed me over the phone for about 20 minutes or so on Friday for this piece. I tried not to give any radical or extremist responses to some of his trick questions. Apparently, I succeeded, since he printed absolutely no quotes from me. I figure I musn't have said anything incriminating.... ;)

Here is the piece:

Free Staters Eye NH, VT
by Jim Kenyon
Valley News, Sunday, July 20th, 2003

  This week, 5,000 "liberty-oriented people" across the country who share a bitter distain for big government will begin voting on which small, rural state they intend to peacefully take over.  Those who have signed up for the Free State Project will have 10 states to choose from.
  With both New Hampshire and Vermont on the ballot, this could have major repercussions for the Upper Valley. One of the Free Staters' goals is to reduce wasteful government spending. If Vermont is the pick,t he soon-to-be-built $1.7 million Queechee Gorge Visitors Center is a goner. And since the group also hopes to eliminate unnecessary government jobs, Executive Councilor Ray Burton better hope that New Hampshire isn't the choice.
  The other states on the ballot are Alaska, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming. Once the voting is completed, the Free Staters' game plan calls for the recruitment of thousands of other like-minded people who would be willing to move to the chosen state within the next five years.
  By Fee Staters' math, 20,000 is the magic number. In a small state such as New hampshire or Vermont, they figure, thats enough political activists to swing the balance of power in their favor. After they have used the ballot box to take control of key positions in local and state government, the Free Staters can then start putting their policies into place. That means dismantling public schools, repealing gun control laws, and striking down local zoning ordinance.
  The Free Stae Project was started two years ago by Jason Sorens, a twenty-something Yale PhD. Although not officially endorsed by the Libertarian Party, the project draws much of its support from party members. "Ideas like this have been floating around for a while," Sorens told me last week. "After the 2000 election, I started thinking of differenty strategies. The idea of concentrating our resources into one state seemed to be the most logical."
  The wining state will be announced on Sept. 15th, with Wyoming and New Hampshire currently considered to be the front runners. New Hampshire's appeal stems partly from the fact that libertarians wouldn't have to understake the bothersome process of repealing state income and sales taxes, since there are none to start with.
  John Babiarz of Grafton, chairman of New Hampshire's Libertarian Party and 2002 Gubernatorial candidate, also has been pitching the state's strong job market and diverse geography. Newcomers could choose between living near the ocean, in the mountains or int he state's urban centers, close to Boston. "If you can't enjoy life, what's the point?" Babiarz told me. (I didn't dare ask him if that's why Free Staters also support legalizing drugs and prostitution.)
  For me, New Hampshire is the logical choice simple because there would be no need to change the state's license plate slogan. "Live Free or Die" is made for Free Staters.
  But Vermont has its advantages, too. As the second smallest state (only Wyoming has fewer residents), it presumable wouldn't be very long before the Free Staters were in control. In February, Sorens made an official visit to the state, which he later wrote about and posted on the Free State Project's website (www.freestateproject.com).
  Part of Sorens' weekend was spent with the leaders of the "Take Back Vermont" movement, who tolde him the story of how a few years ago the bouth a car once owned by then-state Sen;. Cheryl Rivers, a liberal Democrat from Windsor County, and destroyed it with a sledgehammer in front of the Statehouse. "The grassroots conservatives in Vermont are not exactly slick political operatives," Sorens surmised.
  Sorens' trip to Vermont included a visit with Neil Randall, a former state representative from Bradford who was elected as a Libertarian and a Republican. Last week, Randall said he was impressed by how well organized the Free State Project seems to be, but it's still too early to tell whether it will succeed. He's sure, though, it won't be in Vermont. "The state has already been taken over once by t he same method," he said.
  Randall said he was referring to the "left-wing socialists" who have been moving into the state since the 1960's. But during a tour of Vermont's largest city, Burlington Mayor Peter Clavelle assured Sorens that this was just an "urban myth." (I winder if this was before or after they visited Ben & Jerry's)
  Sorens, who whill be teaching political science at Yale in the fall, summed up the report on his February visit to Vermont in a couple of sentences: "It's cold. The winter could wear on some people, but complaining about the weather is looked down upon in Vermont."
  Regardless of whether Free Staters can take the cold, most people think the group doesn't standa  chance. But I think they might make it, because in politics, anything is possible.
  I wonder, though, how this will go over with President Dean.

Jim Kenyon can be reached at Jim.Kenyon@valley.net

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Steve

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In World Net Daily
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2003, 07:57:50 pm »

On home-schooling:
http://worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=33619

I highly recommend bookmarking this link:
http://news.google.com/news?q="Free+State+Project"
« Last Edit: July 21, 2003, 07:58:24 pm by Steve »
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Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2003, 09:28:12 pm »

So here is an interesting story.

I hadn't talked to some of my family about the Free State Project. My husband and I both come from very liberal families - some of mine are even very politically active Democrats in Maine. In any case, I usually avoid the topic of politics with them rather than get into arguments that nobody would win.

But, with the article a week ago Sunday, on the front page of the paper that all of my relatives read, and my name right in the first paragraph, it was obvious that they would all be asking me about it.

The response from my Maine relatives was pretty mild, basically they seem to think that I'm just going through a phase. I got a good laugh over that. My mom even confessed that she agrees with me on more issues than most of the other relatives.

But, I've actually been a little worried over what my husband's grandmother would think and say. She lives in New Hampshire, claims to be a Democrat, is very set in her ways, and never holds back her opinion - negative or positive. So, when Jim went to go visit her tonight, I decided I had to "work late" and let him buffer the response first  :)

LOL! I can hardly believe the response! She claims to be very proud of me, talked on and on about what a good writeup it was, what a great idea the project was, and how all of her friends had been calling her and saying the same thing. She and Jim talked about it for over two hours.

So, there is the unofficial response from the supposedly set-in-their-ways, Democrat, senior citizens of New Hampshire.  They support us. Or at least this small but fairly representative group does. :D

It's funny how sometimes even those people you would expect to oppose the project end up supporting it once they really understand it.
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Dave Mincin

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2003, 09:55:33 pm »

Thanks Michele.  I have been waiting for that story! :)
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Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2003, 08:09:35 am »

This editorial ran in the Portsmouth Herald on July 13
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/07132003/opinion/39306.htm

For the most part, I thought it was pretty good and quite welcoming:

"All of us who live here know New Hampshire is a unique state. We try to keep our dependence on the federal government low; we have one of the lowest crime rates in the country along with one of the highest livability rankings; there is a mix of rural towns and small to moderate cities; a basic distrust of large, national unions - particularly liberal, pro-federal government unions such as the National Education Association - and, best of all, a "Live Free or Die" attitude that keeps our government small, relatively low cost and accessible to all citizens wishing to become involved in it.

... That movement, according to the group's Web site, involves a plan to bring 20,000 or more "liberty oriented people" to the state where they will work within the political system to reduce the size and scope of government.  

Now that has to sound appealing to anyone who lives in New Hampshire, the site of the first real battle of the Revolutionary War (the attack on Fort William and Mary to secure arms for the rebel army), and where battles from the war for independence are re-enacted yearly throughout the state. ..."


It then goes on to talk about federal and federal/state programs, and concludes with this:

"All this being said, we believe New Hampshire would benefit from an influx of people who feel the way the Porcupines feel. It would generate interesting discussions at all levels of government that could lead to innovations that would save us all money, while increasing our individual liberties.

However, if we are to break our dependence on programs on which we have come to rely there must be a feasible transition plan that will allow those who are currently receiving needed services to continue to get them. It will be the job of the rest of us to temper the enthusiasm of the Free Staters, if they eventually decide on New Hampshire as their target state, with the compassion of people who honestly care about one another."


Basically, an invitation for us to open discussions about voluntary vs. government run programs. Two (that I know of) letters to the editor have been printed in response - the second one, just today.

http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/07172003/letter_t/39871.htm

Porcupines care about people, too

To the Editor:

Your op-ed article about the Free State Project made some interesting points.

As a FSP "Porcupine," I find no real disagreement. New Hampshire is likely to be my state of choice, and I am pleased to know that we would be welcome in your state.

I, too, have compassion for those in need and a good grasp of the web of government money which runs through our lives. I believe that the good people of the FSP are ready and willing to work to extricate the chosen state from this web in a way that will be as fair as possible.

Politics is not everything. In fact, I am compelled to think about politics and government much more than I would like. I want to devote more of my time and money to helping people in need directly, through private means.

So, please do not fear that the Free State Project members are without compassion and vision. There will be many obstacles in our way, but I hope that some day we can all live together in a "Free State."

Marie Angell

(Currently residing in Houston, Texas, and unsure of how to get through those New Hampshire winters.)

http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/07222003/letter_t/40606.htm

Editorial buys into FSP stereotype

To the Editor:

The recent editorial, "Free Staters need to temper philosophy with compassion," while generally positive towards the Free State Project, still perpetuates the inaccurate, yet annoyingly persistent portrayal of liberty, somehow, being at odds with compassion. How such a belief could become popular is baffling, and is apparently rooted in confusion between coerced and voluntary behavior. A clear distinction must be made between the idea of compassion between individual human beings, and the idea of taxpayer-funded compassion programs and agencies.

Most Granite Staters know full well that government-run programs are unaccountable and inefficient; and it's important to remember that there are, and always have been, alternatives. Free people have always associated for the purpose of helping others, without having to be forced to do so. These voluntary programs are far more efficient and effective by their very nature. Especially if they would be allowed to do their work without excessive taxation taking away the people's available income to donate; in other words, public money drives out private money.

Most people are basically good, and can be trusted to help others. Some who fear a free state without compassion should examine their own beliefs with this question in mind: Are they really saying that people cannot be trusted to be compassionate on their own, and must be coerced into paying for government programs? Don't worry, we porcupines won't have the elderly folks of Portsmouth thrown out on the streets; and we'll figure out a way to help them without taxes or federal housing welfare.

Thomas H. deSabla

Silver Spring, Md.
« Last Edit: July 22, 2003, 08:12:18 am by Michelle »
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jgmaynard

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2003, 03:53:15 pm »

There were three LTE's in the Sentinel in favor of the FSP the last couple weeks.... I was one person, don't know who the other two were. Of course, they don't put them on line! ::)
My gf keeps recycling the paper before I can retype it. :D

JM
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Michelle

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Re:More Great NH Media Coverage
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2003, 06:36:07 pm »

New Hampshire high on list for Free State project
By SYVIA SMITH
Courier Correspondent

LANCASTER-
Freedoms -- like being able to purchase beer at grocery stores and shoot off firecrackers - have put the Granite State high on the list of potential targets for the Free State Project, which wants to enlist 20,000 like-minded people to move to a low-population state in order to advocate for smaller government.

Participants in the movement recently tested the waters here and found a lot to their liking.

Along with Montana and Wyoming, New Hampshire is one of the top contenders to be the chosen state. Heading its list of attractions is New Hampshire's long history of rejecting taxes and espousing individual rights, according to Free Staters.

"I'm impressed by the degree of freedom that New Hampshire people enjoy," said Keith Murphy of Baltimore about his recent week-long participation in a "Welcome to New Hampshire" fact-finding event last month.

Free Staters assembled at Lancaster's Rogers Campground, at a rented hospitality house in Jefferson, and toured the state from June 21-29. Approximately, 150 individuals, many of whom were small business owners, attended the event. They came from 22 states, from as far away as Oregon.

Reached by phone, Murphy, 28, a legislative assistant in the Maryland Legislature, said, "If I didn't have other obligations, I'd be in New Hampshire now." He said his goal during his week in New Hampshire had been to do one thing every day that he couldn't do in Maryland. "The first day, I rode on one of those push merry go rounds that have been banned in Maryland," he said.

"Another day I shot off fireworks, illegal in Maryland. And I enjoyed the convenience, unavailable to us in Maryland, of buying beer in a grocery store."

Murphy was particularly enthusiastic about seeing four zeros in place of the sales tax amount that would have shown up on a Maryland receipt.

The Free State Project was founded by North Carolina resident Jason Sorens, who recently earned a doctorate in political science. Sorens, 26, is a member of the Libertarian Party, but he described the Free State Project as an independent organization made up not only of Libertarians, who comprise approximately 40 percent of the membership, but Republicans, independents, Green Party members, and others with a libertarian bent. Its board of directors is made up of one Libertarian, Sorens, a Republican, and three Independents. Sorens describes as "broadly libertarian" the Free State philosophy that a government's main reason for being is to protect individual rights.

"Our intent is to lend our support to the existing small government movement in the state that is chosen," said Sorens during a recent phone interview. "It's appealing that there's a Libertarian network in place in New Hampshire. Also a plus is the state's cross-nomination system, allowing a candidate to run under two or more political labels."

Asked if an influx of 20,000 people would strain municipal services, Sorens said, "We emphasize being a net positive community. We have a high proportion of professionals and small business owners who would be bringing their capital and expertise to the state. We would give more into the system than we take out. Most of our members either home school or private school. We don't believe in taking welfare."

He continued, "Then again, we are not your typical suburbanites either. We would, for instance, oppose tax-supported garbage collection and support a plan to reduce the statewide property tax." Sorens said that those relocating would have five years to do so. Thus, the exodus would be staggered.

Most of the Free State visitors spent up to a week exploring New Hampshire. They also attended programs organized by the state Libertarian Party's Welcome to the Granite-State committee. Michael Badnarik of Austin, Texas, and Cleveland, Ohio, resident Gary Nolan, who are both seeking the Libertarian candidacy for president, spoke at one event.

Attendees met with local citizens and business people. Gov. Craig Benson greeted them during an informal chat during their tour of the State House. John Babiarz of Grafton, who chairs the N.H. Libertarian Party and ran for governor in the last election, said that one venture capitalist who is considering relocating his business here flew in from Nevada to be among those meeting the governor.

Michelle Dumas, 34, of Somersworth, one of the Welcome to the Granite State organizers, said several attendees told her they'd each talked to 30 New Hampshire citizens and gotten only positive responses to the prospect of 20,000 Free Staters relocating here.

To attract people to the New Hampshire fact-finding event, Dumas prepared a comprehensive report on the state, which can be viewed online at www.lpnh.org, under "Welcome to New Hampshire." Among the state's attractions, Dumas listed its ranking by "Liberty Magazine" as having the fourth-lowest taxes per capita in the nation and that it's alleged to have the highest concentration of high-tech workers in the U.S. She also noted the state's number 6 ranking from the Small Business Survival Committee, which evaluates how states and local governments interact with small businesses and entrepreneurs.

According to The Granite State organizers, attendees responded enthusiastically to the Granite State's scenic beauty and friendly citizens.

"The striking thing," said Atlanta resident Trevor Snyder during a phone interview, "is that every person we spoke to said, "Come and do whatever you want. As long as you don't bother others, they won't bother you."

Synder, an information tech manager for a company that builds airports, noted that one of his friends had been leaning toward Wyoming, but by the end of the week, the Granite State had become his top choice.

Others also told organizers that they definitely were going to cast their votes for the Granite State. "It would be good for the project to come here," said Dumas. "New Hampshire, known for its spirit of independence, is a state that reflects their ideals. Of the other states that they have been looking at, Alaska, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wyoming - New Hampshire has the lowest dependence on federal dollars. Their coming here would help us to build on the strengths of this state."

Jackie Casey of Portland, Ore., already has made plans to relocate to New Hampshire. The 32-year-old army veteran has worked in software quality assurance most of her career. After encountering the Libertarian philosophy in college, she founded the Libertarian Students Club at the University of Arizona. Casey's father lives in Gilmanton Ironworks, but she says that isn't the only reason she is coming here. "For me, no state income and sales taxes is a major attraction."

State Republican Party chair Jayne Millerick of Chichester reacted positively to the possibility of 20,000 Free Staters moving here.

"The prospect of having a number of active dedicated voters, regardless of their party affiliation, move to New Hampshire is good for the state. Much of their ideology, such as individual liberty, personal responsibility, and free trade is similar to ours. We are good at presenting issues to New Hampshire voters, regardless of their party ties," she said. "We would enjoy the challenge of persuading newcomers to vote with us. The larger problem would be with the Democrats. You'd be hard pressed to find a Libertarian voting Democratic."

But Pamela Walsh of Concord, the press secretary for the state Democratic Party, wasn't as pessimistic about the impact on her party.

"We're not opposed to making government smaller, but sometimes things, such as defense, schools and environmental protection, can only be accomplished by the community together. We agree with the Libertarians on some issues, such as personal privacy and the right to free choice in reproductive matters," Walsh said. "I don't know how they would vote here. They agree with us on some issues and the Republicans on others. In many ways, they sound as split as the rest of the electorate."

The Free State Project concept was first proposed by Sorens in a 1971 article in the online journal "Libertarian Enterprise." Sorens recently earned his doctorate in political science from Yale. He will be a lecturer at Yale this fall.

He said his main motivation for the Free State Project was "to really make a difference somewhere and to show the rest of the country what could be done by reducing the role of government."

He said, "We believe in bringing policies closer to the local level. The further away government gets, the more likely it is to tread on individual freedom."

August 15 is the deadline to sign up for the Free State Project. The movement needs 5,000 pledged members to vote on the relocation state this fall. According to Sorens, over 4,400 individuals so far have committed themselves to the plan. Most of them have signed up online at www.freestateproject.org.

http://courier-littletonnh.com/30list
« Last Edit: July 23, 2003, 06:46:08 pm by Michelle »
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Penfist

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Re:More Great NH Media Coverage
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2003, 06:39:34 pm »

I see Jason got started on this idea when he was not even a gleam in dad's eye. I'm 32 and I was born in 1971 :) Hehe.

New Hampshire high on list for Free State project
By SYVIA SMITH
Courier Correspondent

LANCASTER—
Freedoms – like being able to purchase beer at grocery stores and shoot off firecrackers – have put the Granite State high on the list of potential targets for the Free State Project, which wants to enlist 20,000 like-minded people to move to a low-population state in order to advocate for smaller government.

Participants in the movement recently tested the waters here and found a lot to their liking.

Along with Montana and Wyoming, New Hampshire is one of the top contenders to be the chosen state. Heading its list of attractions is New Hampshire’s long history of rejecting taxes and espousing individual rights, according to Free Staters.

“I’m impressed by the degree of freedom that New Hampshire people enjoy,” said Keith Murphy of Baltimore about his recent week-long participation in a “Welcome to New Hampshire” fact-finding event last month.

Free Staters assembled at Lancaster’s Rogers Campground, at a rented hospitality house in Jefferson, and toured the state from June 21-29. Approximately, 150 individuals, many of whom were small business owners, attended the event. They came from 22 states, from as far away as Oregon.

Reached by phone, Murphy, 28, a legislative assistant in the Maryland Legislature, said, “If I didn’t have other obligations, I’d be in New Hampshire now.” He said his goal during his week in New Hampshire had been to do one thing every day that he couldn’t do in Maryland. “The first day, I rode on one of those push merry go rounds that have been banned in Maryland,” he said.

“Another day I shot off fireworks, illegal in Maryland. And I enjoyed the convenience, unavailable to us in Maryland, of buying beer in a grocery store.”

Murphy was particularly enthusiastic about seeing four zeros in place of the sales tax amount that would have shown up on a Maryland receipt.

The Free State Project was founded by North Carolina resident Jason Sorens, who recently earned a doctorate in political science. Sorens, 26, is a member of the Libertarian Party, but he described the Free State Project as an independent organization made up not only of Libertarians, who comprise approximately 40 percent of the membership, but Republicans, independents, Green Party members, and others with a libertarian bent. Its board of directors is made up of one Libertarian, Sorens, a Republican, and three Independents. Sorens describes as “broadly libertarian” the Free State philosophy that a government’s main reason for being is to protect individual rights.
“Our intent is to lend our support to the existing small government movement in the state that is chosen,” said Sorens during a recent phone interview. “It’s appealing that there’s a Libertarian network in place in New Hampshire. Also a plus is the state’s cross-nomination system, allowing a candidate to run under two or more political labels.”

Asked if an influx of 20,000 people would strain municipal services, Sorens said, “We emphasize being a net positive community. We have a high proportion of professionals and small business owners who would be bringing their capital and expertise to the state. We would give more into the system than we take out. Most of our members either home school or private school. We don’t believe in taking welfare.”
He continued, “Then again, we are not your typical suburbanites either. We would, for instance, oppose tax-supported garbage collection and support a plan to reduce the statewide property tax.” Sorens said that those relocating would have five years to do so. Thus, the exodus would be staggered.

Most of the Free State visitors spent up to a week exploring New Hampshire. They also attended programs organized by the state Libertarian Party’s Welcome to the Granite-State committee. Michael Badnarik of Austin, Texas, and Cleveland, Ohio, resident Gary Nolan, who are both seeking the Libertarian candidacy for president, spoke at one event.

Attendees met with local citizens and business people. Gov. Craig Benson greeted them during an informal chat during their tour of the State House. John Babiarz of Grafton, who chairs the N.H. Libertarian Party and ran for governor in the last election, said that one venture capitalist who is considering relocating his business here flew in from Nevada to be among those meeting the governor.
Michelle Dumas, 34, of Somersworth, one of the Welcome to the Granite State organizers, said several attendees told her they’d each talked to 30 New Hampshire citizens and gotten only positive responses to the prospect of 20,000 Free Staters relocating here.

To attract people to the New Hampshire fact-finding event, Dumas prepared a comprehensive report on the state, which can be viewed online at www.lpnh.org, under “Welcome to New Hampshire.” Among the state’s attractions, Dumas listed its ranking by “Liberty Magazine” as having the fourth-lowest taxes per capita in the nation and that it’s alleged to have the highest concentration of high-tech workers in the U.S. She also noted the state’s number 6 ranking from the Small Business Survival Committee, which evaluates how states and local governments interact with small businesses and entrepreneurs.
According to The Granite State organizers, attendees responded enthusiastically to the Granite State’s scenic beauty and friendly citizens.

“The striking thing,” said Atlanta resident Trevor Snyder during a phone interview, “is that every person we spoke to said, ‘Come and do whatever you want. As long as you don’t bother others, they won’t bother you.’”

Synder, an information tech manager for a company that builds airports, noted that one of his friends had been leaning toward Wyoming, but by the end of the week, the Granite State had become his top choice.

Others also told organizers that they definitely were going to cast their votes for the Granite State. “It would be good for the project to come here,” said Dumas. “New Hampshire, known for its spirit of independence, is a state that reflects their ideals. Of the other states that they have been looking at, Alaska, Delaware, Idaho, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wyoming – New Hampshire has the lowest dependence on federal dollars. Their coming here would help us to build on the strengths of this state.”
Jackie Casey of Portland, Ore., already has made plans to relocate to New Hampshire. The 32-year-old army veteran has worked in software quality assurance most of her career. After encountering the Libertarian philosophy in college, she founded the Libertarian Students Club at the University of Arizona. Casey’s father lives in Gilmanton Ironworks, but she says that isn’t the only reason she is coming here. “For me, no state income and sales taxes is a major attraction.”

State Republican Party chair Jayne Millerick of Chichester reacted positively to the possibility of 20,000 Free Staters moving here.
“The prospect of having a number of active dedicated voters, regardless of their party affiliation, move to New Hampshire is good for the state. Much of their ideology, such as individual liberty, personal responsibility, and free trade is similar to ours. We are good at presenting issues to New Hampshire voters, regardless of their party ties,” she said. “We would enjoy the challenge of persuading newcomers to vote with us. The larger problem would be with the Democrats. You’d be hard pressed to find a Libertarian voting Democratic.”

But Pamela Walsh of Concord, the press secretary for the state Democratic Party, wasn’t as pessimistic about the impact on her party.

“We’re not opposed to making government smaller, but sometimes things, such as defense, schools and environmental protection, can only be accomplished by the community together. We agree with the Libertarians on some issues, such as personal privacy and the right to free choice in reproductive matters,” Walsh said. “I don’t know how they would vote here. They agree with us on some issues and the Republicans on others. In many ways, they sound as split as the rest of the electorate.”

The Free State Project concept was first proposed by Sorens in a 1971 article in the online journal “Libertarian Enterprise.” Sorens recently earned his doctorate in political science from Yale. He will be a lecturer at Yale this fall.

He said his main motivation for the Free State Project was “to really make a difference somewhere and to show the rest of the country what could be done by reducing the role of government.”

He said, “We believe in bringing policies closer to the local level. The further away government gets, the more likely it is to tread on individual freedom.”

August 15 is the deadline to sign up for the Free State Project. The movement needs 5,000 pledged members to vote on the relocation state this fall. According to Sorens, over 4,400 individuals so far have committed themselves to the plan. Most of them have signed up online at www.freestateproject.org.

http://courier-littletonnh.com/30list
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JonM

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Re:More Great NH Media Coverage
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2003, 06:47:51 pm »

The Free State Project concept was first proposed by Sorens in a 1971 article in the online journal "Libertarian Enterprise." Sorens recently earned his doctorate in political science from Yale. He will be a lecturer at Yale this fall.

More impressive than Jason's mastery of time travel is the ability to find an online journal in that year.
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Michelle

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Re:More Great NH Media Coverage
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2003, 06:57:47 pm »

I see Jason got started on this idea when he was not even a gleam in dad's eye. I'm 32 and I was born in 1971 :) Hehe.

LOL  ;D I read this three times before I posted it and I didn't even catch that!
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Penfist

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2003, 07:07:50 pm »

I used to make my living editing people's writing, so I tend to catch stuff ;) I caught some other errors that I didn't bother mentioning :)
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Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2003, 08:06:57 pm »

I used to make my living editing people's writing, so I tend to catch stuff ;) I caught some other errors that I didn't bother mentioning :)

Yeah. I saw them too. But, since this reporter was so enthusiastic about the project (I half expected her to come sign up as a member after we talked - I wonder of she did), I figured it was better not to mention the errors and just enjoy the good press  :D
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LeRuineur6

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2003, 10:58:49 am »

A citizen from New Hampshire DEFENDED the Free State Project an an editorial today against an earlier editorial by John Bachman.

http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/Main.asp?SectionID=31&SubSectionID=359&ArticleID=85459

Columnist paints faulty picture of Free Staters’ principles, view of government

Apparently columnist John Bachman doesn’t know much about the Free State project and even less about Libertarian principles (Perspectives, The Sunday Telegraph, July 20).

Since Mr. Bachman can’t muster even a figment of a sound argument against the project, he resorts to inaccurate ridicule and emotive words: Free-Staters are “plotting a political invasion” to “take over the government”– as though this group plans something sinister or illegal like an invasion of Iraq to take over the government.

Mr. Bachman is obviously confusing the Free Staters’ idea of government with the government he likes.

He then goes on to compare Libertarian principles to communism of all things: “from all according to ability and to all according to need.” In fact, Libertarians don’t want to take anything from anybody.

Mr. Bachman is again confusing the government Libertarians would like with the government he likes that takes and takes and takes (by force) from the able.

He continues his absurd straw man comparison by implying that Libertarians want a government that “requires a bureaucracy with unlimited power” – precisely the opposite of Free Staters’ goals.

He tries to tarnish Libertarians with a pedantic non sequitur quote from Lord Acton; “Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” Yet again, Mr. Bachman is describing the government he likes, not what Free Staters want.

He says: “The Libertarian path leads to anarchy, rule by warlords.” I think Mr. Bachman is thinking of our own government representatives giving up their constitutional power to declare war to the warlord in the White House.

Mr. Bachman continues his rant by suggesting Libertarians would be in favor of selling beer and cigarettes to 10-year-olds.

No, Mr. Bachman, Libertarians would not want these dangerous drugs sold to 10-year-olds. But many would be in favor of adults actually having a greater say than government over which drugs they can put into their own bodies.

Unlike Mr. Bachman who calls this “espousing such nonsense,” most Libertarians think you are more competent to decide what goes into your own body than government employees. (Mr. Bachman could hire a non-government adviser to decide for him if he feels incompetent.)

Mr. Bachman’s claim that he has a dopey twin brother is by far the most convincing part of his piece. Twins often share many traits. Among other disagreeable habits, Mr. Bachman claims his twin brother “emits various foul-smelling gases.”

I think Free Staters reading Mr. Bachman’s piece would seriously question which twin brother is the dopey one.

They would certainly question which brother emits the most foul-smelling gas.

Carmen Yarrusso

Brookline
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Penfist

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2003, 11:22:59 am »

I want to hire this Carmen woman to write our press releases. She's great!
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FSP in the Union Leader!
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2003, 08:22:55 am »

New Hampshire's largest newspaper, the Union Leader, has carried an op-ed (written by your truly), in today's paper... Copied below.

http://www.theunionleader.com/opinion_show.html?article=24286

Your Turn, NH:
Free State Project would
keep NH government small
By JAMES MAYNARD
Guest Commentary
 
 
THERE IS A small-government political movement under way which could change forever the dynamics of the debate over the size and cost of New Hampshire government, and it has little to do with the current battle raging between Gov. Craig Benson and Sen. Dick Green.

The Free State Project aims to bring 20,000 small-government activists, donors and candidates to one state to work within the political process to make government smaller, less expensive and more accountable. And New Hampshire is on the “short list” of states the organization is considering for its home.

The group has formed on the Internet (www.freestateproject.org), and it boasts more than 4,500 members who have pledged to move to the chosen state when the group reaches its goal of 20,000 members.

The “Live free or die” attitude and history of New Hampshire, along with our lack of any general sales or income taxes, helmet, adult seat belt or mandatory insurance laws are just a few of the things which are enticing about New Hampshire to members of the Free State Project. But what are the benefits for New Hampshire residents if the project decides to settle in the Granite State?

First, a good percentage of people involved in the project are owners of small businesses. If the FSP chooses New Hampshire, we will likely see more than 10,000 small businesses relocated to our state, lowering unemployment and raising wages.

If each of the expected 20,000 members spent just a modest $25,000 a year in the state, that level of consumerism would infuse our state with an additional $500 million a year in the New Hampshire economy.

But even more importantly, the members would work to save New Hampshire from the threat of broadbased taxes and irresponsible spending. The Free State Project could end big-government spending and the threat of a broadbased tax forever in the Granite State. It would ensure responsible state spending and low taxation throughout the state.

At the local level, members of the Free State Project would work with New Hampshire citizens in town meetings, and in the cities on warrant articles supporting minimal taxation and opening educational opportunities. They would work for greater leeway in the use of private property and for the reduction of unnecessary regulations on free enterprise. This would stir a small business boom that would embolden the New Hampshire economy for many years to come.

The Free State Project is a mixture of common-sense ideas and thinking outside the box. While working within the framework and reality of real-life state and local politics, the group will not be afraid to try new things and take lessons from the business world to bring New Hampshire a smaller, less expensive, more accountable government. Working its way through smaller offices and earning experience and knowledge, the group will help New Hampshire to maintain it’s advantage as a low-tax, small-government state.

While meeting with members of the Free State Project the day after his historic budget veto, Gov. Benson welcomed the group to “come on up” to New Hampshire. Above the governor’s desk is a painting of former Gov. Meldrim Thomson Jr. Within the painting of the former governor is a sign on his desk which reads “Low taxes are the result of low spending.” The Free State Project members agree with this philosophy, as do a majority of New Hampshire residents.

New Hampshire supporters within the Free State Project held a week-long convention in Lancaster in the last week of June. The event was attended by people from 22 states and Canada who have pledged to move to the Granite State to help us in our fight against a broadbased tax if our state is chosen for the project’s goals.

New Hampshire is proud of our independence from government, and this is reflected in our state’s “Live free or die” motto. The New Hampshire supporters within the Free State Project are working hard to welcome small government activists to the Granite State.

The group is currently conducting its vote for its state of choice, and anyone wishing to join the project and cast a vote will need to join before Aug. 15. New Hampshire is the best choice for the FSP, and the FSP is a great choice for New Hampshire.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2003, 08:39:30 am by jgmaynard »
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