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Author Topic: Yet MORE NH Media Coverage  (Read 26998 times)

jgmaynard

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Yet MORE NH Media Coverage
« on: July 10, 2003, 02:04:24 pm »

This is an amazing amount of publicity for the FSP.... NH supporters of the project have been asked to do four major interviews in just over 24 hours.
The Nashua Telegraph (http://freestateproject.org/media_archives/0067.htm)
Portsmouth Herald, Foster's Daily Democrat and Tiger Radio 1590 AM are all doing major stories on the project, and Michelle, Rich and George Reich are each doing interviews with those media outlets yesterday and today.
Kudos to them, interviews look far easier than they actually are. :)

Yet another NH advantage: If the "Live Free or Die" state is chosen as the free state, the media-experienced LPNH will be able to stay "plugged in" to regional and national media outlets, and provide the project extensive media outreach from the day the vote is announced.

There is a large media presence in NH and New England. The LPNH knows enough not to assume they will come to us. FSP members in NH will have an experienced media team, getting the word out about porcupine elections, issues, warrant articles, etc. from the day after the vote.

We'll keep you up to date as the articles are posted.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2003, 08:57:21 am by jgmaynard »
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Dalamar49

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2003, 02:24:45 pm »

The utility and hardwork of the NH crew continues to astound me. If only all Libertarians were so marketable!  :D
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LeRuineur6

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2003, 03:24:19 pm »

Quote
The utility and hardwork of the NH crew continues to astound me. If only all Libertarians were so marketable!

...and people ask us what PROOF we have that the people of New Hampshire are hard-working.

HA!
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jgmaynard

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2003, 09:10:09 pm »

Thank you folks.... It is really, really amazing to be a part of such a great team. :D

JM
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Michelle

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2003, 10:28:57 pm »

Here is the first article - it ran yesterday  :)

http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/Main.asp?SectionID=25&SubSectionID=354&ArticleID=84219

Free Staters see member boom

By ALBERT McKEON, Telegraph Staff
mckeona@telegraph-nh.com

They're less than 600 John Hancocks shy of starting a movement.

The Free State Project - a group that hopes to make a U.S. state into a free society - claims it now has about 4,440 members, and expects to reach the 5,000-member mark by next month.

Hitting that goal would realize a dream for many Free State members. At that point, members would choose one of 10 states from a list that includes New Hampshire, aiming to find a state that would make an ideal home for a "sphere of liberty."

It's a goal that longtime members never thought would be reached this quickly, but now that it's almost within sight, they are hopeful that 15,000 more people will sign on just as fast. Then, the 20,000 members would move to the chosen state and attempt to establish a libertarian society.

"When I first got involved, 18 months ago, we were thinking years" Michelle Dumas, a Free State Project media coordinator, said of the 5,000-member goal.

Because of rapid growth, the group has set an August target date to take part in the vote, Dumas said. Potential members must sign up by Aug. 15, and members will have until Sept. 8 to return their ballots, Dumas said. The chosen state will be announced Sept. 15.

If the group does not sign up 5,000 members by next month, then those deadlines will be extended, Dumas said. But because of steady growth, the group feels confident it will hit that mark by Aug. 15, she said.

The project has not yet decided how it will make its mark in its chosen state. It could join an existing Libertarian Party, or forge an alliance with conservative Republicans. Some hope the project can be a political party in itself.

The project would aim to cut the size and scope of state government by two-thirds. Group members say they do not want to secede from the United States, or pit themselves against the federal government.

New Hampshire still places high on the project's wish list of 10 desirable states, Dumas said. The others are Vermont, Maine, North Dakota, South Dakota, Delaware, Montana, Idaho, Alaska and Wyoming.

Many members like the Granite State because it has inherent qualities that are consistent with the group's ideals of limited government and individual liberties, Dumas said. Members approve of Gov. Craig Benson's recent budget veto, and he has, in turn, been welcoming to the group, she said.

People from 22 states visited New Hampshire last month when the Free State Project held a weekend getaway in Lancaster, Dumas said.

Once a state is chosen, the group will wait to attract 20,000 members before initiating a mass move to that state. But if New Hampshire is selected, many members have expressed an interest in moving to the state much sooner, Dumas said.

Albert McKeon can be reached at 594-5832.
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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2003, 10:32:00 pm »

This is an amazing amount of publicity for the FSP.... NH supporters of the project have been asked to do four major interviews in just over 24 hours.
The Nashua Telegraph (http://freestateproject.org/media_archives/0067.htm)
Portsmouth Herald, Foster's Daily Democrat and Tiger Radio 1590 AM are all doing major stories on the project, and Michelle, Rich and George Reich are each doing interviews with those media outlets yesterday and today.
Kudos to them, interviews look far easier than they actually are. :)

Yet another NH advantage: If the "Live Free or Die" state is chosen as the free state, the media-experienced LPNH will be able to stay "plugged in" to regional and national media outlets, and provide the project extensive media outreach from the day the vote is announced.

This is great news.  However, wouldn't these people be able to do just as much good in any state?  If they went to Alaska or North Dakota, would their ability to give quality interviews change?  It seems like it would be the same and that this is as good for ND and AK as it is for NH.  Just some thoughts.
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Michelle

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2003, 07:43:10 am »

Note that this reporter didn't quote me precisely in a few places, or even quoted me slightly out of context, but it is still an excellent article  :)

20,000 activists may make N.H. a permanent home

By Adam Leech
news@seacoastonline.com

PORTSMOUTH - New Hampshire and Maine are on a small list of states that a group of 20,000 advocates of limited government will choose from to organize their attempt to reduce the size and scope of government.

In September, the 5,000 members of The Free State Project will vote on which state to move to, where their plan is to increase its membership, reduce state and local law, reform state and local laws and end federal mandates.

The eight other states that are being considered are Idaho, Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming. Eventually the 20,000 members of the group will move to the state which has been chosen.

According to Elizabeth McKinstry, vice president of the project, of the 10 states there are five states that are the most likely candidates. She said while Maine is not in the upper tier, New Hampshire is one of the most intriguing possibilities.

"New Hampshire is definitely one of the top contenders," she said.

McKinstry said New Hampshire's long history of small government and limited tax burden are two of its most appealing features.

"New Hampshire has a strong position on liberty and independence," she said. "Also, it is absolutely gorgeous, which many members recognize."

The Libertarian Party of New Hampshire formed the Welcome to the Granite State Committee to promote New Hampshire as the most desirable Free State candidate.

"I'd like to think we're in the lead," said Michelle Dumas, a member of the committee. Dumas said the project is not necessarily a Libertarian movement but many of the goals of the project are in line with those of the party.

"It would make sense that we would work together," she said. "We're not trying to change anything, we're actually trying to make New Hampshire more like itself."

Dumas said the 400-member State Legislature offers the best representation of any state in the nation.

"It's a government for the people more than any other state," she said.

According to The Free State Project Web site, of the 16 variables that are considered most important in choosing a state, New Hampshire ranks in the top three in 12 categories; Maine ranks high in three. Out of the variables New Hampshire got the top ranking in six, the most of any state; three more than runner-up Wyoming.

New Hampshire received the highest rank in:


low federal dependence

geography

low crime rate

smaller state and local government sector

livability ranking

low percentage of National Education Association/ American Federation of Teachers members
Maine did not receive a top ranking in any category.

McKinstry said among the states being considered all have a population under 1.5 million. Maine and New Hampshire have the highest populations of the candidates, which is considered a negative attribute.

"Obviously a state with less population will be easier to make an impact on," she said.

Maine is not considered to be a top candidate, according to McKinstry.

Dumas pointed to the high tax burden in Maine as a reason why it is not as attractive as New Hampshire.

"Maine has a lot of good points," she said. "But their are a lot of advantages in New Hampshire that doesn't seem to be part of [the Maine] culture."

McKinstry said Maine's wilderness and open space is enticing to project members.

"[Maine] has a lot going for it in terms of quality of life issues," she said.

Rep. Daniel Itse, R-Freemont, said he would not be opposed to the project settling in New Hampshire because they are free to move as they please. He said his stance on "small government" is politically close to the project's, as well.

"For a group of people to pro-actively [move to a state] is a lot better than the state we have where people ignore politics and don't think they can control it, so they don't do anything about it," he said. "This is the antithesis."

Rep. Richard Morris, R-S.Hampton, said he is also in favor of less government and he would welcome discussion with anyone who has ideas on how to reduce taxes.

"I promote everybody's position of opportunity, if someone thinks something should be changed then more power to them," he said. "That's one of the things that makes this country great."

Itse said he thinks the project could have a significant impact because the House has become more conservative as of late, but he said their impact could not be overwhelming.

"In a state of 1.3 million, a group of 20,000 may be able to shift a handful of towns," he said. "But ultimately the public's displeasure with the state government is what will force change."

Itse said the state currently has 80 conservative Republicans in the House of Representatives and the movement might be able to push that to 100.

Morris said some of the country's greatest feats were realized by people who did what they believed, regardless of what anyone had to say to them.

"If you look back historically it was the people with the perseverance and tenacity who had a passion for their cause that implemented change," he said.

McKinstry said she expects the project to draw people to the state once it is established, which she expects to take a couple decades.

"We're not looking to do anything radical right off," she said. "Things like that take time."

http://www.portsmouthherald.com/news/07112003/news/38769.htm
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Sebastian

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2003, 08:16:49 am »

Quote
wouldn't these people be able to do just as much good in any state?  If they went to Alaska or North Dakota, would their ability to give quality interviews change?
No, but they'd momentarily lose the familiarity they currently have with their state, their expertise at getting these kind of things done in their state. I'm sure that it's only a matter of time though before all of us will get to know just how to get things done in the state that is to be our future home.
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Michelle

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2003, 11:40:52 am »

This was featured above the fold on the front page of the Sunday
Fosters Daily Democrat - covers Southern NH, Southern ME, and the
Lakes Region in NH.

N.H. said a front-runner for libertarian splinter group
By DEAN ABBOTT
http://www4.fosters.com/News2003/July2003/July_13/News/do_0713c.asp

Staff Writer

Like most mothers, Michelle Dumas is concerned about the kind of
society her young daughter will grow up in. "I want to raise my
daughter in a place free from violent crime, where she will have
access to high quality education, and where personal responsibility
is inherent in the culture," Dumas said.

Concern for the kind of society where her daughter will grow up is
one of the reasons why the 33-year-old Somersworth woman joined the
Free State Project after discovering the group on the Internet about
18 months ago.

According to the group's Web site, the Free State Project is a group
dedicated to "the effort to sign up 20,000 advocates of limited
government to move to a single state" with the goal of influencing
public policy in that state. The group hopes to concentrate the
political efforts of its libertarian-leaning constituency in a state
with a small enough population where 20,000 activists could make a
difference.

And make a difference they could. University of New Hampshire
Political Science Instructor David Corbin said an influx of 20,000
focused activists could have a tremendous impact on New Hampshire
politics. "The world could be theirs in New Hampshire," he said.

While the short list of options for where the group may be headed
currently contains 10 states, including Alaska, Delaware, Maine,
Montana, Vermont and Wyoming, New Hampshire is a front-runner to be
chosen as the destination state when the group votes in little more
than a month, said Dumas, who serves the group as a media
coordinator.

If New Hampshire is chosen, some members would begin moving here
immediately though none are obligated to come for five years.
Members of the group would likely settle across the state since they
will not be required to live in any particular region.

The project's Web site describes the political position of many of
its members. "Most FSP members support policies such as the
abolition of all income taxes, elimination of regulatory
bureaucracies, repeal of most gun control laws, repeal of most drug
prohibition laws, complete free trade, decentralization of
government, and wide-scale privatization."

The group began its drive to recruit members — all of whom promise
to move to a particular state — in September 2001, hoping to reach
5,000 commitments by September 2004. The project's founders planned
to hold a member vote to select the target state once membership
reached the 5,000 mark.

The group has beaten its goal date by more than a year. The number
of people who have joined so far is about 4,500. The group plans to
hold its vote in on Aug. 15.

"New Hampshire has seemed to be in the lead, or one of the states in
the lead since the beginning of the project, and there are good
reasons for that," Dumas said.

Dumas gave several reasons why New Hampshire is attractive to FSP
members, but first among these is New Hampshire's long-standing
tradition of limited government and self-reliance. "New Hampshire
has a spirit of independence that has survived 200-plus years. It's
almost legendary" Dumas said.

UNH's Corbin echoes this observation. "A lot of people when they
think of New Hampshire, they think of `Live Free or Die.' It's part
of life here, it's on our license plate, and it means something," he
said.

Corbin said this political spirit stretches back to the beginnings
of the United States. "At the founding," he said, "some states
incorporated a much more centralized view of government and others a
much more Jeffersonian (view), ... that emphasized decentralization.
New Hampshire had a Jeffersonian upbringing."

Continued....
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Michelle

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2003, 11:41:25 am »

FSP members like Dumas are advocating within the group to persuade
other voters to select New Hampshire in the upcoming election. "New
Hampshire is a state where the values of small government and self-
reliance are already primary in the culture. Since what the Free
State Project is seeking to do is to find a state where these values
are already inherent in the culture, New Hampshire seems like the
number one choice. I'm optimistic that New Hampshire will be the
choice. Very optimistic," she said.

Part of the efforts aimed at persuading FSP members to choose New
Hampshire in the August election involved a recent convention in
Lancaster. "People came to New Hampshire from all over the country.
Many went around the state speaking to individuals they came into
contact with, and the reports that came back to me were that nearly
everyone was receptive to the Free State Project," Dumas said.

Jason Sorens, president of the Free State Project, said there are
more tangible reasons than just a tradition of independent spirit
that might make New Hampshire a good destination for the
group. "Many think New Hampshire is best for us because it has low
taxes and a strong anti-tax movement, a wide range of personal
freedoms, a strong tradition of local democracy, and low dependence
on federal government subsidies," he said.

Sorens also said New Hampshire has attracted the attention of the
Free State Project because it has "resisted some trends in other
states toward controlling people's private lives. For example, New
Hampshire has no motorcycle helmet law and no seat belt laws for
adults."

Many factors making New Hampshire an attractive place for Free
Staters are institutionalized in the way New Hampshire is governed.
Dumas said the nature of the New Hampshire Legislature is a good
example; "We have a 400-member Legislature. It offers the best
representation in the nation. The government is closer to the
people. Even more important is that we pay our legislators only $100
a year, so we end up with a government of the people."

Corbin said the state's Constitution reflects a strong view of
individual rights as well. "When you look at the New Hampshire state
Constitution you see it's divided into two major parts. The first
part is a Bill of Rights. The second part is the form of government.
So, when the framers of the New Hampshire Constitution framed it,
they purposely began by stating what the individual rights were
before turning to a discussion of what form of government would be
necessary to secure those rights."

Sorens pointed to New Hampshire's practice of allowing political
candidates to run on two separate party lines as an attractive
political tradition. This practice, he said, "would allow us to have
direct access to the Statehouse. We could run people who are
Libertarians and they could also get the Republican nomination and
pick up Republican voters and, of course, the same thing could be
done with Democrats."

New Hampshire's most well-known political event, its presidential
primary, is not a major draw for the Free Staters, according to
Sorens. "Some members would say it matters, but for most it is a
positive, but relatively minor consideration, because we're focused
on state politics."

One issue sure to be contentious should FSP members' move to New
Hampshire is education. "Currently, our educational system is really
a government monopoly. What we would want to do is create more
school choice, to return educational decisions back to the hands of
the parents," Dumas said.

FSP members have ranked the desirability of the 10 candidate states
by a variety of factors. One of those desirability factors concerns
states with fewer members in the National Education Association, a
nationwide union and professional association for educators. New
Hampshire tied with Idaho for first place in this category. Terry
Shumaker, executive director of the New Hampshire NEA, was puzzled
by this fact. "I'm surprised by that statement." he said, "We have
over 14,000 active members in New Hampshire. We're the largest
education association in the state."

Sorens said ranking the state's by NEA membership was a way of
trying to measure how open the area would be to the group's efforts
to introduce full school choice. "The NEA has generally opposed any
efforts toward educational choice or competition, so a state with a
higher NEA membership would be less fruitful ground for those
policies" he said.

Shumaker said the New Hampshire NEA "doesn't necessarily oppose it
(school choice) so long as the field is level." A level playing
field, Shumaker said, means that "if public money is going to go to
a school, then the same requirements should be placed upon any
school receiving public funds," he said.

Sorens claimed introducing full educational competition and choice
would "lead to higher quality schools at lower costs just as other
markets are better off when they are freed from government monopoly
control."

If New Hampshire is chosen as the destination state for Free State
Project members, some members have pledged to move here immediately,
though none would be obligated to move here for five years.
Consequently, quality of life projections have been important to the
group. "New Hampshire has a very strong job market, and areas of New
Hampshire have affordable real estate. I don't have any worries
about being able to assimilate into New Hampshire both economically
and culturally" Sorens said.

Dumas indicated that Free Staters moving to New Hampshire could
benefit the state. "It is my impression," she said, "that people in
the Free State Project tend to be overwhelmingly entrepreneurial, so
they would be moving here and creating new opportunities and jobs."

If New Hampshire should be chosen by the Free State Project and even
if all 20,000 members should move to the state, Corbin wonders how
effective they would be. "Libertarian thought rests on the idea
of `leave me alone''' he said. "When you get a bunch of those people
together, how do you get them organized?"

Corbin says the activist's ability to organize is even more
important than their numbers. "To say 20,000 people move to the
state and the game is over, I think, is incorrect, but if 20,000
move to the state with means to support the activities you need to
do in politics, they could have a tremendous impact," he said.

When asked about what the official response from the state would be
should FSP members choose New Hampshire and begin moving here, Chris
Reid, a staff member for Governor Craig Benson said "As long as they
believe in the rule of law, I can't imagine the governor being
opposed to anybody moving to New Hampshire because of their
political beliefs. The sign at the border say `Welcome' and we mean
it."

Because FSP's plans are not yet firm, some New Hampshire members,
though hoping to stay put, are preparing to move should another
state be chosen. Dover member George Reich, 45, said "I think
freedom is more important than living in a particular state. I would
be willing to move to another state to be a part of this."
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Michelle

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Re:NH supporters granted four major interviews in 24 hours
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2003, 09:45:16 pm »

This is well worth repeating:

"And make a difference they could. University of New Hampshire
Political Science Instructor David Corbin said an influx of 20,000
focused activists could have a tremendous impact on New Hampshire
politics. "The world could be theirs in New Hampshire," he said."

Though impressive enough, David Corbin is more than an academic. He was also a state representative and a state senator, plus he ran for governor. So, here is someone outside of the FSP membership, in an excellent position to know the political climate of the New Hampshire, and he states that we will be successful in NH.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2003, 09:45:51 pm by Michelle »
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jgmaynard

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2003, 10:26:34 pm »

OK... I changed the title of this thread, because we are getting a lot more coverage in NH this last week than just the 4 original interviews...

BTW, Michelle, I didn't place the name... THAT David Corbin! He was my favorite Republican running for Governor in 2002... LOVED his web site! :D

Back to the thread.... This was in today's (Sun 7-13) Portsmouth Herald

They end by suggesting we shoudl find private market solutions to Governmental services.... It might BE GREAT if the FSP got together for some charitable gig. Could do us a world of good with voters in the Free State. :D


Free Staters need to temper philosophy with compassion

Complete 2003 Editorial Archives

Hampton Union

Exeter News-Letter

Rockingham News


To write a letter to the editor please email opinion@seacoastonline.com

 
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All of us who live here know New Hampshire is a unique state. We try to keep our dependence on the federal government low; we have one of the lowest crime rates in the country along with one of the highest livability rankings; there is a mix of rural towns and small to moderate cities; a basic distrust of large, national unions - particularly liberal, pro-federal government unions such as the National Education Association - and, best of all, a "Live Free or Die" attitude that keeps our government small, relatively low cost and accessible to all citizens wishing to become involved in it.

It is just these attributes, bolstered by an active Libertarian Party that not long ago received in excess of 5 percent of the popular vote in a gubernatorial election, that has enticed The Free State Project to begin to think very seriously about establishing its movement here.

That movement, according to the group’s Web site, involves a plan to bring 20,000 or more "liberty oriented people" to the state where they will work within the political system to reduce the size and scope of government.

Now that has to sound appealing to anyone who lives in New Hampshire, the site of the first real battle of the Revolutionary War (the attack on Fort William and Mary to secure arms for the rebel army), and where battles from the war for independence are re-enacted yearly throughout the state. In fact, next weekend the American Independence Museum will host such a re-enactment on its grounds during a weekend celebration.

However, let’s look a little deeper into what this group hopes to accomplish.

The Web site, www.freestateproject.org, actually defines the "liberty" these Porcupines, as Free Staters call themselves, seek to enact in the state they will flock to.

"Our members’ philosophy is that being free and independent is a great way to live and that government’s role should be to defend individuals from force and fraud."

Sounds like something anyone feeling the burden of skyrocketing property taxes and increased federal intrusions into the business of the states through such legislation as No Child Left Behind, the Homeland Security Act, The Patriot Act and, now, the proposed Patriot II Act, would gravitate towards. However, there are ramifications to the approach advocated by Free Staters that must be considered as well.

Right or wrong, we have become dependent of a number of federal and federal/state programs, in some cases, for our very existence. There are, of course, Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security, but also the Federal Highway program that sends hundreds of millions of dollars to the state every year and supplies hundreds of jobs to our citizens.

There are federal arts grants, education grants and housing grants. Housing for the elderly and poor would virtually disappear in Portsmouth, for example, without Section 8 money.

Our law enforcement agencies are just now getting around to developing a communications system that will allow them to talk to each other thanks to a federal grant, and federal and state grants have helped us to preserve the colonial history the Porcupines are often so eager to talk about.

Matching grants that use state money to secure federal funds for our schools, our businesses and nonprofits that serve our needy, may not be available if the Free Staters have their way and the scope and size of government is reduced.

All this being said, we believe New Hampshire would benefit from an influx of people who feel the way the Porcupines feel. It would generate interesting discussions at all levels of government that could lead to innovations that would save us all money, while increasing our individual liberties.

However, if we are to break our dependence on programs on which we have come to rely there must be a feasible transition plan that will allow those who are currently receiving needed services to continue to get them. It will be the job of the rest of us to temper the enthusiasm of the Free Staters, if they eventually decide on New Hampshire as their target state, with the compassion of people who honestly care about one another.

- Seacoast Newspapers

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The Light of Alexandria By James Maynard

A history of the first 1,000 years of science, and how it changed the ancient world, and our world today.



http://www.lightofalexandria.com

Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2003, 01:40:50 pm »

BTW, Michelle, I didn't place the name... THAT David Corbin! He was my favorite Republican running for Governor in 2002... LOVED his web site! :D

No. I didn't place the name at first, either. Rich Tomasso noticed it.

I am extremely pleased with how positive all this publicity has been. Really positive! Some of the best soundbites:

"All this being said, we believe New Hampshire would benefit from an influx of people who feel the way the Porcupines feel. It would generate interesting discussions at all levels of government that could lead to innovations that would save us all money, while increasing our individual liberties. "
Portsmouth Herald editorial

"And make a difference they could. University of New Hampshire Political Science Instructor David Corbin said an influx of 20,000 focused activists could have a tremendous impact on New Hampshire politics. "The world could be theirs in New Hampshire," he said."

"UNH's Corbin echoes this observation. "A lot of people when they think of New Hampshire, they think of `Live Free or Die.' It's part of life here, it's on our license plate, and it means something," he said.

"Corbin said this political spirit stretches back to the beginnings of the United States. "At the founding," he said, "some states incorporated a much more centralized view of government and others a much more Jeffersonian (view), ... that emphasized decentralization. New Hampshire had a Jeffersonian upbringing."


UNH Political Science professor, former NH state representative and former state senator. Fosters article.

"Rep. Daniel Itse, R-Freemont, said he would not be opposed to the project settling in New Hampshire because they are free to move as they please. He said his stance on "small government" is politically close to the project's, as well."
Portsmouth Herald article

"Rep. Richard Morris, R-S.Hampton, said he is also in favor of less government and he would welcome discussion with anyone who has ideas on how to reduce taxes."
Portsmouth Herald article


« Last Edit: July 14, 2003, 01:50:15 pm by Michelle »
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jgmaynard

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2003, 12:51:44 pm »

John Babiarz was just interviewed by Valley News in Grafton, NH for an article that they are doing on the FSP.
We'll give you all the link when that comes out!

JM
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The Light of Alexandria By James Maynard

A history of the first 1,000 years of science, and how it changed the ancient world, and our world today.



http://www.lightofalexandria.com

Michelle

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Re:Latest NH Media Coverage
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2003, 02:46:19 pm »

Just an FYI that the LPNH site has been updated with links to all of the recent FSP media coverage in New Hampshire. There are also links to the audio archives of recent radio broadcasts about FSP in NH.

http://www.lpnh.org/news.htm
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Please join NHLA today! http://www.nhliberty.org With every new member we gain political weight to support liberty-friendly candidates and promote liberty throughout NH.
Support the Liberty Scholarship Fund. Please make a donation today! http://www.lsfund.org
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