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Author Topic: Mountains in the West  (Read 12846 times)

freedomroad

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Mountains in the West
« on: July 08, 2003, 11:48:38 am »

There is a great difference between mountains in the West (what many people call real mountains) and mountains in the East (what many people call hills).  I've been to Western mountains (several ranges in CO and one in AZ).  I live in the East and have been to Easter mountains (TN, AR, GA, NC, VT, and NY).  There is a great difference between the two types of mountains.

In Western mountains the air seens to feel better, the sky looks nicer, the crowds are smaller, and the peaks are nicer.  If you want to snow Ski, go to the Western mountains as they are much better.  VT has some decent skiing but it is nothing like CO, WY, and UT.  

There is a new website on some of the Western mountains.  It is on the Mountains of Wyoming.

It looks at 5 different mountain ranges (Grand Teton, Wind River, Bighorn, Snowy Range, Black Hills).  The site includes:

 1. pictures, pictures, and more pictures

 2. Lots of information and links

Check it out,
http://members.aol.com/mtofwy/mountains.html
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jenlee

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2003, 01:35:46 pm »

I remember when I was flying into Co. The pilot mentioned Pikes Peak. Made the claim it was the tallest mountain in the US. I started laughing. A lady sitting next to me took offense when I mentioned that Pikes Peak was a tiny mountain. She demanded to know where there was taller mountains in the US. I told her, why Alaska of course. She was ready to agrue that point with me until her hubbie told her to hush cos Alaska does have higher/bigger mountains that anywhere in the US.

So for skiing, Alaska beats all states. Alaska beats all states anyway.  ;D  Hands down Alaska has it all.
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freedomroad

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2003, 01:46:35 pm »

I remember when I was flying into Co. The pilot mentioned Pikes Peak. Made the claim it was the tallest mountain in the US. I started laughing. A lady sitting next to me took offense when I mentioned that Pikes Peak was a tiny mountain. She demanded to know where there was taller mountains in the US. I told her, why Alaska of course. She was ready to agrue that point with me until her hubbie told her to hush cos Alaska does have higher/bigger mountains that anywhere in the US.

So for skiing, Alaska beats all states. Alaska beats all states anyway.  ;D  Hands down Alaska has it all.

The Northeast is gets ice and that is no good for skiing (when compared to the Mountain-west).

I never know that Alaska had better skiing the Salt Lake City and Vail, but I'll take your word for it because I've never been to Alaska.
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Rearden

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2003, 06:18:46 pm »



The Northeast is gets ice and that is no good for skiing (when compared to the Mountain-west).

I never know that Alaska had better skiing the Salt Lake City and Vail, but I'll take your word for it because I've never been to Alaska.

I'm not going to pretend that the Northeast can match the West for overall skiing.  I've been to both plenty of times, and I know better.

However, I will take issue with that one generalization, there, Keith.  

You ever been to Jay Peak, VT?  For my money the best all around skiing in the East.

Resort          Average Snowfall
Vail                       346
Jay Peak                351

Source: White Book of Ski Areas


You should check out Jay.  It's a blast.  www.jaypeakresort.com

Keith
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Aaron

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2003, 06:36:21 pm »

Pikes Peak?  Even Mount Whitney in California is taller.  That pilot wasn't just leaving out the mountains of Alaska; he had it completely wrong even if he meant the 48 contiguous states.

Mt. Whitney  Calif. 14,494
Pikes Peak  Colo.  14,110

#of mts. in U.S. higher than Mt Whitney:  16 (all in Alaska)
# of mts. in U.S. higher than Pikes Peak:  58 (18 in Alaska  40 in CA, CO, and WA)

Stats from:
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001798.html
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Joe

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2003, 06:54:19 pm »

Pikes Peak is not the highest in Colorado.
Mt Elbert and Mt. Massive, both visible from outside my door,
are 14,433 and 14,421 respectively.

I regard a mountain as a "mountain" if it has at least 3,000 verticle feet of relief (compared to surrounding trailheads).

All but North Dakota and Delaware have mountains.
North Dakota deserves honorable mention.

Delaware barely has "hills".
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Aaron

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2003, 07:00:14 pm »

You are right, Joe.  From the info at my link above, Mt. Whitney is the only U.S. mountain not in Alaska that is higher than the two you mention.  In fact, out of the 40 non-Alaskan U.S. mountains higher than Pikes Peak, 31 are in Colorado, 6 are in California, and 3 are in Washington.
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freedomroad

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2003, 10:32:53 pm »



All but North Dakota and Delaware have mountains.
North Dakota deserves honorable mention.

Delaware barely has "hills".

But Joe, Delaware has a large swamp.  Doesn't that count for something :)
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guy777

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2003, 11:54:32 pm »

Yeh, Delaware also has beaches, so what's the point.
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Hank

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2003, 07:45:15 pm »

Are we picking states with mountains for skiing? ::) ???

Or are we picking states with mountains that contribute to liberty?

To bad we don't have West Virginia in the list anymore.
THOSE mountain folk really know liberty.
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Zxcv

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2003, 08:05:41 pm »

Quote
Mt Elbert and Mt. Massive, both visible from outside my door,
are 14,433 and 14,421 respectively.

I  regard a mountain as a "mountain" if it has at least 3,000 verticle feet of relief

Don't forget Ranier in Washington. 14,410'. The towns near the base are at less than 2000'. It is one massive mountain. Probably more massive than Mt. Massive!   :)
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Robert H.

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2003, 08:17:27 pm »

To bad we don't have West Virginia in the list anymore.
THOSE mountain folk really know liberty.

West Virginia folks do know a great deal about personal liberty, but the state itself takes in a large amount of government pork.

Robert H.

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2003, 08:18:50 pm »

Quote
Mt Elbert and Mt. Massive, both visible from outside my door,
are 14,433 and 14,421 respectively.

I  regard a mountain as a "mountain" if it has at least 3,000 verticle feet of relief

Don't forget Ranier in Washington. 14,410'. The towns near the base are at less than 2000'. It is one massive mountain. Probably more massive than Mt. Massive!   :)

And, of course, one of our own candidate states,  Alaska, boasts the tallest mountain in North America: Mt. McKinley (Denali) at 20,320 feet.  It can be seen from a loooooooong way off.   ;)

freedomroad

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2003, 11:44:06 pm »

Hello Everyone,

I was just in the mountains of Wyoming.  I visited Casper Mountain, the Bighorn Mountains, and the Black Hills.  I had a great time and did lots of hiking.

Casper Mountain is right next to Casper.  Actually, hundreds of people live in Casper Mountain.  There are kid’s camps, a resort, tons of hiking and snowmobile trials, and a ski resort in Casper Mountain.

The Bighorn Mountains are serious mountains.  The Bighorns are within a 30 minute drive of around a dozen Wyoming towns.  There are two major roads that cut through the mountains and various other roads.  The mountains feature several resorts and a nice ski area.  Streams, lakes, boating, fly fishing, and other water sports abound.  Through all of my hiking in did not even get a tick!  Butterflies are everywhere.  Rock climbing opportunities are all over the mountains.

I could talk about the Black Hills for weeks.  Behind the Great Smoky Mountains the Black Hills are the most famous mountains in America and for good reason.  There are dozens of caves including the 3rd and 6th largest caves in the world.  Mount Rushmore, Crazy Horse Mountains, and other famous mountains are scattered throughout the Black Hills.  Some of the best rock climbing in the world is found in the Black Hills. Four types of deer and wilds animals of all times abound.  Water sports are big and there are DOZENS of casinos.

I could go on forever about my journeys in the mountains of the West.  I live in TN and have been to the Ozarks of AR/MO, the Appalachian Mountains of TN/NC/GA, the Green Mts of VT, and both major mountain ranges of NY.  There is nothing in the East that can even begin to compare with the lowest mountain range of the West, the Black Hills.
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kbarrett

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Re:Mountains in the West
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2003, 03:04:50 pm »

Quote
Mt Elbert and Mt. Massive, both visible from outside my door,
are 14,433 and 14,421 respectively.

I  regard a mountain as a "mountain" if it has at least 3,000 verticle feet of relief

Don't forget Ranier in Washington. 14,410'. The towns near the base are at less than 2000'. It is one massive mountain. Probably more massive than Mt. Massive!   :)

And, of course, one of our own candidate states,  Alaska, boasts the tallest mountain in North America: Mt. McKinley (Denali) at 20,320 feet.  It can be seen from a loooooooong way off.   ;)

I was back east for a convention last june.... my impression of the US east of the Mississippi is best summed up by: "The land is flat, the trees are small, and the air is brown" .

Just my impression as a westerner, I guess....

Do yourself a favor.... vote Alaska for first or second choice.

« Last Edit: July 31, 2003, 03:05:37 pm by kbarrett »
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Regards,
Kristopher Barrett
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