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Author Topic: Property taxes?  (Read 8335 times)

shooter77

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Property taxes?
« on: April 21, 2011, 01:37:47 pm »

I've heard that the property taxes are high in NH.  Is this true?  I currently live in one of the highest taxed counties in the US so high to me may be different than to someone else.  This is why I don't own property here.  I'd like to buy some land in NH.  Sounds like a much better investment.  Just don't want out of control taxes on it.  That should be one of the first things to reform.  Let land owners actually own their land and not have to pay rent on it!
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freedomroad

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2011, 01:55:46 pm »

I've heard that the property taxes are high in NH.  Is this true?

Higher than average for the US.  It varies by location.

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 I currently live in one of the highest taxed counties in the US so high to me may be different than to someone else.  This is why I don't own property here.  I'd like to buy some land in NH.  Sounds like a much better investment.  Just don't want out of control taxes on it.


You should have no problem with that.  Just do a little research and buy property that will be taxed low or not at all.

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That should be one of the first things to reform.  Let land owners actually own their land and not have to pay rent on it!

It is decided on the local level by the voters in most of NH.  Some voters like high property taxes.  Some voters like low property taxes.  It is easier to move to a town with low property taxes than to convince all of your neighbors to vote to reduce property taxes but if that is someone you would like to do, more power to you.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 10:19:48 pm by LoveAndPeace »
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shooter77

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2011, 05:45:07 pm »

I was looking at the keene area I know there is a city or town close to it that teaches krav maga.  I read somewhere that the property taxes were high. but I don't mind living somewhere close by either.  I'm still researching stuff.  I like being rural but close to civilization.  I also like to be in a mountanous type of area.  Thanks for the info though.
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freedomroad

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2011, 06:02:56 pm »

I was looking at the keene area I know there is a city or town close to it that teaches krav maga.  I read somewhere that the property taxes were high. but I don't mind living somewhere close by either.  I'm still researching stuff.  I like being rural but close to civilization.  I also like to be in a mountanous type of area.  Thanks for the info though.

Sure, folks in Keene pay just about the highest property taxes in NH.  But, Keene is a city and so the people don't get to control the property taxes.  Instead, the folks in Keene vote in nonpartisan elections for what is likely an all Democratic city council.  Though, if you look at the results from the school budget, which is voted on by the voters, the overwhelming majority of voters in Keene (the voters that actually show up and vote) support yearly tax and spending increases.  The towns with the lowest taxes near Keene are generally Walpole and Westmoreland.  Though, depending on your living situation you can pay little taxes in Winchester, any other near-by town or even Keene.  If you want to pay little property taxes without living in a town with low property taxes, there is a lot you can do.

1. Get tenants.  You can rent out 1/2 your place if you have a duplex or just rent out a couple rooms if you have a smaller place.  You could move into a group living situation.  You could live in a trailer, RV on someone else's property or just live in a small house.  You could also be a caretaker either of a property or a person that needs live-in help.

If you want to both live in Keene and want to pay low property taxes, it is possible but you have to be creative. 

The Keene area is generally considered the most rural part of southern NH (almost everyone in NH lives south of Concord).  Pretty much everything north of Concord except Lebanon and Laconia is rural.

All of NH outside of the majority of the seacoast, Salem, Nashua and all of the towns near Salem and Nashua is near mountains.  I have no idea on martial arts in NH, and especially self-defense/attack centric martial arts like krav maga.  You could probably learn how to shoot a gun anyway in NH and keep in mind NH is the safest state in the nation.  I hear there is a church of the sword near Manchester if you like swords.
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shooter77

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2011, 11:16:10 am »

I was looking at the keene area I know there is a city or town close to it that teaches krav maga.  I read somewhere that the property taxes were high. but I don't mind living somewhere close by either.  I'm still researching stuff.  I like being rural but close to civilization.  I also like to be in a mountanous type of area.  Thanks for the info though.

Sure, folks in Keene pay just about the highest property taxes in NH.  But, Keene is a city and so the people don't get to control the property taxes.  Instead, the folks in Keene vote in nonpartisan elections for what is likely an all Democratic city council.  Though, if you look at the results from the school budget, which is voted on by the voters, the overwhelming majority of voters in Keene (the voters that actually show up and vote) support yearly tax and spending increases.  The towns with the lowest taxes near Keene are generally Walpole and Westmoreland.  Though, depending on your living situation you can pay little taxes in Winchester, any other near-by town or even Keene.  If you want to pay little property taxes without living in a town with low property taxes, there is a lot you can do.

1. Get tenants.  You can rent out 1/2 your place if you have a duplex or just rent out a couple rooms if you have a smaller place.  You could move into a group living situation.  You could live in a trailer, RV on someone else's property or just live in a small house.  You could also be a caretaker either of a property or a person that needs live-in help.

If you want to both live in Keene and want to pay low property taxes, it is possible but you have to be creative. 

The Keene area is generally considered the most rural part of southern NH (almost everyone in NH lives south of Concord).  Pretty much everything north of Concord except Lebanon and Laconia is rural.

All of NH outside of the majority of the seacoast, Salem, Nashua and all of the towns near Salem and Nashua is near mountains.  I have no idea on martial arts in NH, and especially self-defense/attack centric martial arts like krav maga.  You could probably learn how to shoot a gun anyway in NH and keep in mind NH is the safest state in the nation.  I hear there is a church of the sword near Manchester if you like swords.

that info helps out alot.  My wife isn't on board with this yet, but I've decided I'm not buying land here so maybe in the near future I can buy some shit hits  the fan land in NH and if we visit there and go to some events maybe she'll like the idea more.  I actually think she has some family in NH if I remember correctly. Anyhoo, thanks for all the info
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RichW

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2011, 11:41:51 am »

Welcome shooter77!
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freedomroad

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2011, 04:38:00 pm »

Fox on property taxes.  It is a video and text, they are the same.

Property Taxes Rising in a Down Housing Market
By Gerri Willis
Published May 19, 2011
FOXBusiness

http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/05/19/property-taxes-rising-housing-market
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2011, 07:56:50 pm »

For the seacoast, Seabrook has the lowest property taxes, in part due to the power plant.  With lots of proliberty folks in elected office, we are working to downsize the town budget.  Upon input from residents, we're reigning in spending, cutting hours, promoting user fees, and even discussing privatization.

A few more political activists running for local office, and we'll be able to reduce government as much as the folks have been asking us to.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2011, 06:41:49 am »

Fox on property taxes.  It is a video and text, they are the same.

Property Taxes Rising in a Down Housing Market
By Gerri Willis
Published May 19, 2011
FOXBusiness

http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/05/19/property-taxes-rising-housing-market
I think Fox was more focused on State level property taxes... and maybe confusing rates with actual taxation.
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freedomroad

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2011, 09:37:46 am »

Fox on property taxes.  It is a video and text, they are the same.

Property Taxes Rising in a Down Housing Market
By Gerri Willis
Published May 19, 2011
FOXBusiness

http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2011/05/19/property-taxes-rising-housing-market
I think Fox was more focused on State level property taxes... and maybe confusing rates with actual taxation.


State level vs. federal level?  Yes, I agree.  It didn't appear that Fox was confusing rates with actual taxation to me.  Which part(s) gave you that idea?
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2011, 10:06:03 am »

They don't seem to understand the mechanism that results in the taxation.
Its almost like suggesting the way to lower local property taxes is to induce expanded income or sales taxes... which is exactly what the current problem is. NH suffers less from it, but still suffers due to previous history of collapsing how its government is structured.

So what I'm pointing out... is the suggestion that this is somehow 'bad' rather than a correction to the system.

The 'rates' comment is based on State/county level taxation. Where the loss of stimulus has the greatest ongoing budgetary effects.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2011, 10:12:59 am by John Edward Mercier »
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freedomroad

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2011, 11:59:41 am »

They don't seem to understand the mechanism that results in the taxation.
Its almost like suggesting the way to lower local property taxes is to induce expanded income or sales taxes... which is exactly what the current problem is. NH suffers less from it, but still suffers due to previous history of collapsing how its government is structured.

If anything, the Fox piece was the opposite of that.  It looked at upstate NY and NYC, areas that already have a great variety of taxes.  The reporter was very upset that property taxes were going up and maybe even thought they should be going down.  I have no choice but to believe that you didn't watch the video or read the article at all.  It was just a basic piece but I thought it was fun.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2011, 12:15:18 pm »

The Piece is trying to consider that its comparing apples-to-apples... but on the national level its not.

And a great variety of taxes does not automatically mean that revenues from income and sales taxes is not dropping.
NH State government has the same problem. Its income and sales tax revenues (from a variety of sources) is not meeting projections.
But because of the Property Tax mechanism... this revenue always meets projections... and thus becomes a bigger piece everything else being static.

Like the section on Alaska... a vast resource-rich State that is also a 'recipient' State for federal taxes?
Its not really a good comparison.

The Piece basically boils down to how stable... regardless of the housing industry... that property taxes are.

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Dr_Zinj

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Real NH Property taxes
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2011, 08:57:46 pm »

For what it's worth, I live in Barrington, NH.  (Strafford Co.)

Tax Rates per $1000 (Jan-Jun 2011)
County Rate:  1.25
Local School Rate:  5.69
State School Rate:  1.19
Town Rate:  1.69
TOTAL Rate:  9.8

Total property value of: $265K

I'm paying about $5200 per year in taxes.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Property taxes?
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2011, 02:19:35 am »

My point was that the property tax is stable because of its methodology.
If the revenue to be raised stays the same... and your property value falls... the rate rises to adjust.
In most taxation methodologies, the rate is static, and the revenue raised varies with the basis.
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