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Author Topic: Economic impact of major Universities  (Read 5241 times)

Adam Selene

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Economic impact of major Universities
« on: July 05, 2003, 08:23:31 pm »

[I am not an advocate of Idaho, I have no clear favorite at this time.]

It is well known that economic development and new businesses often grow out of and congregate around major Universities. Silicon Valley grew substantially out of Stanford University, and Austin's technology boom was due to University of Texas.

Doing a survey of major Universities & Colleges in the FSP candidates, one State comes out a clear winner.

Idaho has three (arguably four) major Universities. In addition, Moscow literally shares a border with Pullman, Washington, home to Washington State University. Boise and Moscow both can be very attractive locations for new enterprises.

The rest of the states come out almost in a dead heat. New Hampshire gets honorable mention for containing an Ivy League school, and Montana for the reputation of Missoula. Vermont and Wyoming come out on bottom.


Major Universities & Colleges

Alaska

University of Alaska - Fairbanks
http://www.uaf.edu/
Fairbanks, Alaska
Enrollment: 8,421

University of Alaska - Anchorage
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/
Anchorage, Alaska
Enrollment: 15,040


Delaware

University of Delaware
http://www.udel.edu/
Newark, Delaware
Enrollment: 20,949


Idaho

Boise State University
http://www.boisestate.edu/
Boise, Idaho
Enrollment: 17,714

Idaho State University
http://www.isu.edu/
Pocatello, Idaho
Enrollment: 13,663

Brigham Young University - Idaho
http://www.byui.edu/
Rexburg, Idaho
Enrollment: 9,743

University of Idaho
http://www.uidaho.edu
Moscow, Idaho
Enrollment: 12,067

[ Washington State University ]
[ http://www.wsu.edu ]
[ Pullman, Washington (10 miles from Moscow, Idaho) ]
[ Enrollment: 21,073 ]


Maine

University of Maine
http://www.umaine.edu/
Orono, Maine
Enrollment: 10,698

University of Southern Maine
http://www.usm.maine.edu/
Portland, Maine
Enrollment: 10,966


Montana

Montana State University
http://www.montana.edu/
Bozeman, Montana
Enrollment: 11,670

University of Montana
http://www.umt.edu/
Missoula, Montana
Enrollment: 12,645


New Hampshire

Dartmouth College
http://www.dartmouth.edu/
Hanover, New Hampshire
Enrollment: 5,527

University of New Hampshire
http://www.unh.edu/
Durham, New Hampshire
Enrollment: 14,248


North Dakota

North Dakota State University
http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/
Fargo, North Dakota
Enrollment: 10,534

North Dakota University
http://www.und.edu/
Grand Forks, North Dakota
Enrollment: 12,423


South Dakota

South Dakota State University
http://www.sdstate.edu/
Brookings, South Dakota
Enrollment: 9,260

University of South Dakota
http://www.usd.edu/
Vermillion, South Dakota
Enrollment: 8,569


Vermont

University of Vermont
http://www.uvm.edu
Burlington, Vermont
Enrollment: 10,078


Wyoming

University of Wyoming
http://www.uwyo.edu/
Laramie, Wyoming
Enrollment: 12,366

(edited to change thread title)
« Last Edit: July 06, 2003, 08:02:07 pm by Adam Selene »
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Kelton Baker

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2003, 07:19:35 am »

Universities can also be a disadvantage:

Among those college students who vote, most vote for  more big government, more importantly though, is the fact that a lot of activism efforts are supported by student volunteers, usually freshly-minted socialists coming out of socialism indoctrination classes at the freshman and sophomore class levels of major universities.

State universities are also funded by tax-payers, need we say more?


This said however, some of the universities in our candidate states have the unique advantage (or disadvantage, if you will) of being known as particularly conservative schools.  Wyoming supporters have been making mention of U. of Wyo. as taking a particular obtusive stand against big "liberal" academia standards, BYU-Idaho falls in among the top in a ranking by an entertainment magazine as being a "stone-cold sober" university, several of these universities, particularly Idaho universities, from what I see so far,  also appear to have very active Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) groups organized on campus.  I can also imagine that whether the schools are conservative or liberal, we're going to recruit lots of allies from our chosen state's university(ies).
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JasonPSorens

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2003, 01:23:07 pm »

Adam, the information above is seriously flawed and can be very misleading.  You're counting only public universities, not major private colleges.  I did my own survey of political science faculty in accredited 4-year colleges & universities in all the candidate states, and this is what I found (this # of political science faculty almost surely correlates nearly perfectly with faculty in all other disciplines, and thus with the quality & quantity of higher education to be found in the state):

1. New Hampshire (65)
2. Maine (57)
3. Vermont (53)
4. Idaho (38)
5. Delaware (34)
6. South Dakota (33)
7. Montana (27)
8. North Dakota (15)
9. Wyoming (13)
10. Alaska (9)

Wyoming does have access to a significant number of universities just outside its borders: Utah, Utah State, Colorado State, Northern Colorado, Black Hills State, etc.  But it's clear that the New England states are best for the quantity and quality of higher education, especially in the private sector.  Higher education simply has a much longer tradition there than anywhere else.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2003, 01:50:13 pm by JasonPSorens »
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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2003, 02:39:19 pm »

U.S. News ranks UD among nation’s premiere public universities  
 The University of Delaware is counted among the nation’s premiere public universities, according to rankings released Sept. 7 in U.S. News and World Report’s special issue "America's Best Colleges 2002."
UD ranks 24th among the top 50 public national universities, a distinction it shares with the University of Iowa and Rutgers University, and it moved up two slots from last year’s ranking. The University of California at Berkeley continues to be ranked first among the nation's public universities, a position it also held last year.

UD’s Department of Chemical Engineering was ranked fifth in the nation in a list of top engineering specialty programs also featured in the publication. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology was ranked first in this category.

In the magazine’s list of engineering schools offering the Ph.D., UD was ranked 53rd and tied with, among others, Rutgers University and the University of Iowa. MIT was the top-ranked engineering school in the country.

Princeton University was ranked the top national university, and UD appeared in the second tier of schools in this grouping, which includes private schools.

For its rankings, U.S. News categorizes colleges by mission and region, gathering data on 16 indicators–such as academic reputation, retention, faculty resources and student selectivity–and then ranks colleges against their peers in each category, based on a composite, weighted score.

Complete rankings are available on the magazine’s web site at [www.usnews.com].

In a separate ranking, the October issue of the Yahoo Internet Life magazine has named UD the eighth most technologically advanced university in the nation in its fifth annual "100 Most-Wired Colleges" report. The issue is on its way to subscribers this week and will hit the newsstands and its Internet site on Sept. 18.

UD officials, along with numerous other colleges and universities, opted not to participate in this year’s Yahoo Internet Life survey, and it still was ranked in the top 10. Last year’s top-rated school, Carnegie Mellon University, held on to its number-one ranking.

"Nationally, there is an increased appreciation of the many strengths of the University of Delaware—its faculty, its student body, its research initiatives and its beautiful campus," President David P. Roselle said.

In the last decade, UD has produced three Rhodes Scholars and had alumni named back-to-back MacArthur Fellows. The Class of 2001 alone produced a Rhodes Scholar, a Mitchell Scholar, a Truman Scholar and a member of USA Today's All-USA College Academic First Team.

"The Class of 2005 promises to follow in that tradition of excellence," Roselle said, noting that the freshman class of 3,450 students includes a record 390 who had high school grade point averages of 4.0 and 40 who were valedictorians.

During the last academic year, UD underwent a Middle States Commission on Higher Education reaccreditation review that resulted in a report full of praise for the state of the University.

UD "has every reason to take enormous pride in what it has accomplished over the past 10 years. A decade ago, it was coming out of a period of considerable turmoil. Today, the University is seen as a national model for the integration of information technology in every aspect of university life: teaching and learning, research and service, academic support and campus administration," the evaluation team wrote.

The report also praised UD's physical plant, which it says, "has few, if any, peers among public universities and would be the envy of most private colleges.

"Better than almost any university we are familiar with, Delaware has a clear sense of what it wants to be, namely, a university that offers a high quality undergraduate education with targeted areas of excellence in graduate education and research," the report says.

The evaluation team wrote that "these substantial achievements could not have happened without extraordinary leadership from the senior administration."

Additionally, the team members said they were "enormously impressed by the high level of morale that pervades the faculty, staff and students. Almost without exception, the people we spoke to take great pride in being part of the University."

The self-study and reaffirmation process occurs every 10 years. In 1921, when the Middle States Association was formed, the University of Delaware was among the first institutions accredited by the group, and it has been continuously accredited since that time.

http://www.udel.edu/PR/NewsReleases/2002/sep/9-27-01/usnews.html

 
« Last Edit: July 06, 2003, 02:41:19 pm by guy777 »
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Adam Selene

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2003, 04:01:11 pm »

Adam, the information above is seriously flawed and can be very misleading.  You're counting only public universities, not major private colleges.

No, I was counting "major universities" -- which I qualified as institutions granting 4-year degrees with a student population of at least 5,000; and that was being gracious.

Smaller private universities are all great and fine, but generally only Universities with larger student body, graduate programs and substantial research create the economic impact I described. I've lived around many universities and colleges, I've seen which tend to spawn an economic community around them and which do not.

If you can find major Universities I missed, by all means add them to the list. I took my survey and most the enrollment figures from here:
http://www.universities.com/Search/US/

Couting hair design and bible schools in Idaho is what would have been misleading.

I thought about giving note to Cheyenne's proximity to Colorado State University (Fort Collins), but it is 45 miles away, so I am not sure it will have the same impact. Sure FSP students could commute, but its less likely that a company spawned by gradudate student research will setup a 45 mile commute from campus.
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Adam Selene

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2003, 04:19:48 pm »

this # of political science faculty almost surely correlates nearly perfectly with faculty in all other disciplines, and thus with the quality & quantity of higher education to be found in the state)

I would have assumed this was a troll not worth responding to, were you not the FSP President. Surely this was a joke?

The Poli Sci department is going to be an order of magnitude larger in percentage at a small liberal arts school, than a major research/engineering/medical University -- and I'm certainly not aware the propensity of Poli Sci professors to sit on the Board of Directors of biotech and technology startups.

You're making an apples and oranges arguments. I was not talking about the "quality of education" (however subjectively you may define that) for FSP residents, I was talking about potential for economic growth, generation of new companies and attractive talent pool for relocating businesses.

I am starting to feel like some of the responders are not objective in their replies. Having been a long-term resident of Washington, personally I always despised Idaho, but I am able to look at information objectively and acknowledge were there is an advantage.

As noted by another poster, apparently Newark Delaware may also be an attractive destination.
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JasonPSorens

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2003, 04:51:46 pm »

this # of political science faculty almost surely correlates nearly perfectly with faculty in all other disciplines, and thus with the quality & quantity of higher education to be found in the state)

I would have assumed this was a troll not worth responding to, were you not the FSP President. Surely this was a joke?

Excuse me; this is my profession - I think I know something about how it works. ;)

Quote
The Poli Sci department is going to be an order of magnitude larger in percentage at a small liberal arts school, than a major research/engineering/medical University

Not true.  Major research universities tend to have large political science departments.  Yale, Duke, Harvard, Berkeley, etc., etc.  Universities with large student bodies - those you include in your list - are not necessarily major research universities.  Many of them are glorified tech schools.

Quote
You're making an apples and oranges arguments. I was not talking about the "quality of education" (however subjectively you may define that) for FSP residents, I was talking about potential for economic growth, generation of new companies and attractive talent pool for relocating businesses.

That is different.  However, you can't simply tabulate # of universities without taking quality into account.  Dartmouth is several orders of magnitude more important than Boise State.  Research quality is usually approximated by # of faculty.  Universities with small departments do not allow for specialization.

Quote
I am starting to feel like some of the responders are not objective in their replies. Having been a long-term resident of Washington, personally I always despised Idaho, but I am able to look at information objectively and acknowledge were there is an advantage.

I am perfectly objective here, as always.  However, I am very concerned with making sure that the information presented to the membership is accurate.  I have nothing personal against you at all; I just noticed that the information you posted was very misleading, and I sought to present a more precise and accurate variable.
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Adam Selene

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2003, 06:24:34 pm »

As I said, if I missed a University or College worth noting, please add it to the list.

If you want to post deeper information from which one can draw a more accurate conclusion (such as number of graduate students, annual research budget/grants, faculty counts by school/department, etc), then by all means do.

However, do not post even more subjective numbers. What I posted was accurate, but is only the skim of the surface (so the conclusions may be premature). What you mosted is a gross misrepresentation. Perhaps you experience is more limited than you would like to admit.

Faculty counts:

Poli SciPercTotal Faculty
University of Washington401.0%3905
Pugent Sound University3013.8%218
« Last Edit: July 06, 2003, 06:25:02 pm by Adam Selene »
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Adam Selene

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Re:Idaho: Clear winner for major Universities
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2003, 08:00:39 pm »

BTW, I did not mean to infer that all the Universities listed above *are* major research Universities. As I said, I was being very generous in my qualfications.

Getting numbers such as annual research grant dollars, existence of technology exchange programs, graduate enrollment in particular schools (engineering, medicine, business, law, computer science), etc, would make for a much more complete analysis. Unfortunately it is extremely time consuming, which is why my intention was to start a discussion thread on the topic.

Admittedly it would have been better if I withheld any preliminary conclusions.
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