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Author Topic: Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP  (Read 2784 times)

Number_6

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Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« on: July 15, 2003, 09:06:21 am »

Earlier this year, the cover story of an issue of Business Week magazine was on this topic.  If this trend continues and gains momentum, it could have a major effect on IT, financial analysis and other types of knowledge work.  Many FSP members make their living in such occupations.  Should this be considered when choosing the Free State?
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Sebastian

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2003, 09:16:47 am »

It's being sent overseas because of lower production cost and fewer regulations. This may actually play in our favor, as the free state will (eventually) have lower production costs and fewer regulations. We may be able to provide businesses with a viable, financially attractive, 'patriotic' alternative to sending work overseas.
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Number_6

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2003, 12:46:55 pm »

If the overseas outsourcing of knowledge work becomes widespread, a lot of people in IT and other fields would lose their jobs.  New careers might become necessary, and they could be in resource extraction.  Jobs with oil and mining companies can't be sent overseas, they have to be done here.  A state with plentiful resources might have enough of these jobs to provide those new careers.  Logically then, the FSP might want to consider these states more carefully.  Your thoughts ...
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Karl

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2003, 01:19:53 pm »

If the overseas outsourcing of knowledge work becomes widespread, a lot of people in IT and other fields would lose their jobs.  New careers might become necessary, and they could be in resource extraction.  Jobs with oil and mining companies can't be sent overseas, they have to be done here.  A state with plentiful resources might have enough of these jobs to provide those new careers.  Logically then, the FSP might want to consider these states more carefully.  Your thoughts ...

The loss of IT jobs due to outsourcing has been greatly exagerated by the media.  In fact, despite a slow economy, nearly a half million IT jobs will be created in the next year.

Also, I think it is rather silly to expect computer programmers or related professionals taking up hard rock mining or gas drilling careers.  This kind of expectation is a formula for disaster that does not need to be explained.

Furthermore, according to Wyoming employment projections, mining industries will net only an additional 681 jobs by 2010, to be shared between needy free staters and people who actually know something about those jobs.

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jgmaynard

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2003, 01:21:22 pm »

Ever used foreign made software?  ::)

The free state will provide great incentives, tax and otherwise for the unmatched creativity of the American software designer.....

Resources run out, ideas don't. :D

JM
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freedomroad

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2003, 01:59:19 pm »

It's being sent overseas because of lower production cost and fewer regulations. This may actually play in our favor, as the free state will (eventually) have lower production costs and fewer regulations. We may be able to provide businesses with a viable, financially attractive, 'patriotic' alternative to sending work overseas.

I don't know if the production costs will ever be real low in a state like Alaska or New Hampshire which both have a very high cost of living.  However, for states in the Mid-west and Mountain-west this is a very possible outcome.
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Sebastian

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2003, 02:31:22 pm »

Quote
which both have a very high cost of living.
Is it safe to assume that after a few years (decades?) of successful FSP work, the cost of living in the free state will be lower than it is now?
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cbisquit

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2003, 03:27:20 pm »

Is it safe to assume that after a few years (decades?) of successful FSP work, the cost of living in the free state will be lower than it is now?
Actually that's not very apparent at all. The most likely outcome of 20,000 immigrants making for a more desireable living situation is a net rise in cost of living because our state will become much more enticing. When we move buy as much land as you can get your hands on, it should be a windfall in a few short years.
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freedomroad

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Re:Sending Knowledge Work Overseas and Its Effect on the FSP
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2003, 03:36:10 pm »

Quote
which both have a very high cost of living.
Is it safe to assume that after a few years (decades?) of successful FSP work, the cost of living in the free state will be lower than it is now?

IMHO, it will go higher no matter what good we do.  No matter what we do, it will go higher.  Even if we lower taxes, regulations, energy costs, shipping costs, food costs, and so on.  Housing and property prices are a HUGE chuck of the cost of living calculation.  Unless we destroy the local economy in the Free State, they will continue to go up are ever increase rates.

Keep this in mind.  The FSP's goal is to attract people to a state that would otherwise not move there.  This means the state will have 20,000 extra people there.  We can contact companies ahead of time and get them to relocate there.  We can contact builders and get them to build more houses.  However, as we continue to increase freedom and more and more people move into the Free State, the housing and land prices will have to go up.  As long as freedom continues to work more and more people will move it.

This is one of the reasons why cost of living and more importantly, housing and land prices are so important to us.  As they are starting from a lower level and that means that we will likely be able to add more freedom lovers to these states than states with high cost of living levels.

Add to that, most of the states with low cost of living (SD, WY, ND...) levels have tons of private land while most of the states with high cost of living levels (VT, DE, NH...) have little private land.  The more land we have to develop, the lower future housing costs will likely be.

That is just my take.  

There are other ways of looking at it.  For example, the cost of living levels in Boston and Philly are very high and these levels are slowly moving into DE and NH.  The cost of living levels in Moorhead MN, Spokane WA, Salt Lake City UT, Scottsbluff NE, and Sioux City IA are much lower, but they are still creeping into the near-by FSP candidate states.  

This means that in the areas of the FSP candidate states near out-of-state population centers, the cost of living will be similar to that of the out-of-state population centers.  
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