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Author Topic: Tech jobs in candidate states  (Read 7927 times)

ShadyG

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Tech jobs in candidate states
« on: July 03, 2003, 02:12:02 pm »

Being a software engineer, I thought it might be useful to compare the tech market in the states we're considering.  So I went to Dice.com, which is heavily geared toward tech jobs or jobs at companies that are technology-oriented.  Here are the results for a search on all jobs by state, ranked by volume:

DE: 234
NH: 50
ID: 41
ME: 26
AK: 18
VT: 13
MT: 8
ND: 4
SD: 4
WY: 3

...and the values as measured against the population, specifically people per tech job.  Obviously the best comparison would be technical professionals measured against tech jobs, but I don't have access to that kind of data:

DE: 3450
NH: 25501
ID: 32711
AK: 35766
VT: 47430
ME: 49787
MT: 113681
ND: 158528
WY: 166234
SD: 190266

For my own comparison purposes, to see how difficult it might be to find a job, I ran the numbers of my own home state, CA, and listed its rank among the FSP candidates:

# of tech jobs: 5031 (1)
people per job: 6980 (2)

So in a nutshell, it appears from my rudimentary and very unscientific sample that Delaware has much to offer tech workers.  Or it may just mean that software engineers, database/system/network administrators, and other technology-geared professionals are going to be much better off starting their own business in the free state than they would be looking for a job with an established company.
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LeRuineur6

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2003, 02:24:14 pm »

DE has many, many downsides and few believe it will be the chosen state for the FSP.  In my opinion, the top two candidates at this point are New Hampshire and Wyoming.

NH is perfect for the FSP and I am sure we will find great success there.  By my conservative estimates, NH will have just enough high-tech jobs for all of us within the next 5 years.

For more information regarding High Tech jobs in NH, read this thread:
http://forum.freestateproject.org/index.php?board=5;action=display;threadid=2231

Here is an excerpt from my post in that thread:


"However, please recall the well-known fact that FSP members are "disproportionately high-tech professionals and computer geeks."  Thus, let's be "conservative" and assume that only 30% of us (non-retirees) will need high-tech jobs.  That's an estimated 4,500 high-tech jobs that will need to be available for FSP members.

Will NH have 4,500 high-tech jobs in 5 years?  Here are the high-tech job projections for NH over the next 10 years, divided by 2, to project for only 5 years:

Computer Software Engineers, Applications:  3,861 / 2 = 1,930 jobs
Computer Support Specialists:  1,550 / 2 = 775 jobs
Computer Specialists, All Other:  1,211 / 2 = 605 jobs
Computer Systems Analysts:  944 / 2 = 472 jobs
Computer Software Engineers, Systems Software:  773 / 2 = 386 jobs
Network and Computer Systems Administrators:  684 / 2 = 342 jobs
Network Systems and Data Communications Analysts:  525 / 2 = 262 jobs
Database Administrators:  178 / 2 = 89 jobs
Desktop Publishers:  142 / 2 = 71 jobs

Total Needed High-Tech Jobs in 5 years:  4,500 jobs
Total High-Tech Jobs in NH in 5 years:  4,932 Jobs"
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guy777

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2003, 02:36:58 pm »

Quote
DE has many, many downsides

What downsides? All I see from this particular state is mostly upsides.
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LeRuineur6

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2003, 02:55:48 pm »

Quote
What downsides? All I see from this particular state is mostly upsides.

-Massive land-planning schemes. (planning and zoning)
-Very low Level of gun freedom.
-Highest level of urbanization.
-Percentage of population in the NEA or AFT.
-Government spending. (better than most states, but worse than NH)
-A tiny, tiny land area.
-Livability.
-Crime.
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guy777

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2003, 11:59:38 pm »

Quote
Massive land-planning schemes. (planning and zoning)
-Very low Level of gun freedom.
-Highest level of urbanization.
-Percentage of population in the NEA or AFT.
-Government spending. (better than most states, but worse than NH)
-A tiny, tiny land area.
-Livability.
-Crime.

-Crime- Grant it Wilmington has high crime. It's a large city with big city problems, but the rest of state of Delaware is safer than most other states.

-Livability-Your so wrong about this one. Delaware is one of the most liveable states being considered. You have not been doing your homework. Look at the Delaware post for the Great Debate. This state is the state that has something for everyone.

-A tiny, tiny land area.- Not much smaller than New Hampshire. You sound like a Wyoming supporter now. It would be easier to campaign in a smaller state. This arguement has been discussed between the Wyoming supporters and the New Hampshire supporters before.

-Government spending. (better than most states, but worse than NH)- Come on, I not comparing Delaware with just New Hampshire, I like New Hampshire too. But if you really want to compare states, Delaware beats New Hampshire in other areas. For instance, the least government employees. Every state cannot be #1 in all areas.

-Percentage of population in the NEA or AFT.- Delaware doesn't rank low in this area. What source are you getting your info from.

Highest level of urbanization- Just the Northern part. Refer to the debate sheet.

-Very low Level of gun freedom - This is the only real viable downfall about Delaware, but this law can be easily changed and the laws are improving as I speak.  http://nraila.org/LegislativeUpdate.asp?FormMode=StateList&R=DE It would be foolish to dismiss a state, simply because it has bad gun laws.

Massive land-planning schemes. (planning and zoning)-
Not familiar with this downfall. What is wrong with it? If anything it is a sign of Progress.


In the end, Delaware still is one of the best states for the movement. The numbers speak for themselves. Look at them. Jason Sorens has it posted.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2003, 12:08:13 am by guy777 »
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jgmaynard

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2003, 02:49:59 pm »

I just found a New State Economy Index, ranking high tech jobs by state.

From the site:

"The high-tech focus of states varies significantly, from a high of 10.4 percent of the workforce in Massachusetts to 1.4 percent in Wyoming. While all states have high-tech jobs, the leaders tend to be in the Northeast, the Mountain states, and the Pacific region. High-tech jobs are often concentrated in particular regions of a state: information technology in southern New Hampshire, software around Provo, Utah and Seattle; Internet and telecommunications in the Washington, DC region; telecommunications in Denver; semiconductors in Phoenix; and a broad mix of technologies in Silicon Valley and Los Angeles."

http://www.neweconomyindex.org/states/2002/05_innovation_02.html

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ZionCurtain

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2003, 03:06:20 pm »

I just found a New State Economy Index, ranking high tech jobs by state.

From the site:

"The high-tech focus of states varies significantly, from a high of 10.4 percent of the workforce in Massachusetts to 1.4 percent in Wyoming. While all states have high-tech jobs, the leaders tend to be in the Northeast, the Mountain states, and the Pacific region. High-tech jobs are often concentrated in particular regions of a state: information technology in southern New Hampshire, software around Provo, Utah and Seattle; Internet and telecommunications in the Washington, DC region; telecommunications in Denver; semiconductors in Phoenix; and a broad mix of technologies in Silicon Valley and Los Angeles."

http://www.neweconomyindex.org/states/2002/05_innovation_02.html


It is a good thing we are fighting for Liberty and not how many tech jobs we will have to choose from.    ;)
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Stumpy

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2003, 03:12:17 pm »

It is a good thing we are fighting for Liberty and not how many tech jobs we will have to choose from.    ;)

The two aren’t mutually exclusive of each other.

New Hampshire offers the unique opportunity to find freedom in a place where there are jobs. Wouldn’t you rather choose a state where the economy is flourishing with high tech jobs?

Why eat glass when a prime rib is available?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2003, 03:36:49 pm by Doug(stumpy) »
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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2003, 04:34:01 pm »


Wouldn’t you rather choose a state where the economy is flourishing with high tech jobs?
Why eat glass when a prime rib is available?


No, I'd rather choose a State where only the dedicated will consider going.  We will reach 20,000 no matter which State is chosen.  The question is, who will those 20,000 be?
I'd rather have 10,000 glass-eaters with me than 40,000 creampuffs.

Also, a harsh State is less likely to be counter-invaded by Statists.

And in the medium term we will make all the high-tech jobs we can stand, of course.  There will be no brakes on our Ship of State.

Haven't you noticed that, whenever X number of families settle in an area, there are soon X number of jobs?  The ratio of Jobs to Workers is about the same everywhere; a given number of Consumers always results in a corresponding number of Producers.  There don't have to be Jobs when you first arrive.  If that were true, over a hundred million people would be out of work in North America today.

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ZionCurtain

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2003, 05:06:46 pm »

It is a good thing we are fighting for Liberty and not how many tech jobs we will have to choose from.    ;)

The two aren?t mutually exclusive of each other.

New Hampshire offers the unique opportunity to find freedom in a place where there are jobs. Wouldn?t you rather choose a state where the economy is flourishing with high tech jobs?

Why eat glass when a prime rib is available?

You think we are they only ones looking at that prime rib? I think I will go with the cheeseburger and less people.
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jgmaynard

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Re:Tech jobs in candidate states
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2003, 06:38:28 pm »

That's fine Zion, I'll go with the prime rib and quickly winnable elections. :)

JM
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