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Author Topic: "1000 Miles from Nowhere" (some states may frighten some people)  (Read 7113 times)

MajesticLeo

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Re:"1000 Miles from Nowhere" (some states may frighten some people)
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2003, 10:28:45 pm »

Steven, you stated my position succently.  I agree with Hank that people exist who have varying degrees of discomfort with both cities and open spaces.  I have some of that myself, preferring the open to the city life.  However, I don't want to relegate this "discomfort" to a clinical condition requring treatment.

Any of the states mentioned have both possibilities and areas inbetween, I see no reason for this to influence anyone's choice of state.
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Hank

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Re:"1000 Miles from Nowhere" (some states may frighten some people)
« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2003, 08:05:59 pm »

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That's what frustrates me over the whole country mouse/city mouse arguing: all states offer both urban and rural living.
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I see no reason for this to influence anyone's choice of state.
It shouldn't make a difference for which state because even New Hampshire and southern Delaware offer some respite from the crowding. Otherwise there couldn't be hundred acre farms in Delaware.

But the two quotes above have gotten arguments from city mice here when they discount the big square empty states and don't even rate Sioux Falls big enough to be a "decent" city.  Their definitions of "urban" seem to require a heck of a lot more urban than probably most people here would regard as being enough to "offer both urban and rural living".  I believe some of them are so put off by or even scared by the big empty spaces they won't consider that Casper or Rapid City could be "decent cities".

Heck, Gillette, Wyoming is becoming a lot more urban, civilized, and codified than some of us would feel comfortable with.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2003, 08:08:26 pm by Hank »
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StevenN

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Re:"1000 Miles from Nowhere" (some states may frighten some people)
« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2003, 09:37:40 pm »

Hank,

Well, coming from a 2.5 million MSA, I wouldn't consider Cheyenne or Rapid Falls "big cities" :)

But, I also wouldn't consider Wilmington or Manchester "big cities", either.

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Their definitions of "urban" seem to require a heck of a lot more urban than probably most people here would regard as being enough to "offer both urban and rural living".

I agree, but I don't know if I've really seen much of that on the boards. Unless you mean "implicitly", in which you could very well be right since I lack much of an ability to "read" people. :)
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robmayn

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Re:"1000 Miles from Nowhere" (some states may frighten some people)
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2003, 11:49:05 am »

Hank,

Your suggestion that supporters of New Hampshire as the free state have some kind of mental illness is sickening.  Various NH proponents have given dozens of reasons they support NH, none of which hint at the reason you suggest.  

I agree and have had about as much of it as I can stomach.  I come from Vermont, the most rural state in to country and I absolutely LOVE the wide open spaces and mountains.  That being said, I am also of the opinion that vast wide open spaces makes the kind of organizing, neccessary to the survival of this project, difficult.  In states like New Hampshire and Vermont, I can live in a rural setting and still be within easy commute distance to attend meetings, rallies etc., anywhere in the state.
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