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Author Topic: The Great State Debate  (Read 41640 times)

craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2003, 03:31:08 pm »

<bump>

(Volunteers:  Opening statements are due by July 8th.)
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2003, 09:30:56 am »

(Bump, again.)

Volunteers:  Opening statements are due by July 8th.  South Dakota's opening statement is already up.

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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2003, 08:37:54 am »

<Bumped again, in case any other state reps have their opening statments ready to post.>
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Gary Snyder

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2003, 12:14:39 pm »

DELAWARE

by Gary Snyder (delaware@garysnyder.org)

I've rarely been to Delaware (just driven thru, mostly) but I believe an OBJECTIVE analysis (see Jason Sorens’ brilliant state comparison analysis at www.freestateproject.org/stateanalysis.htm) makes it the best candidate state for the following reasons:

1) Population:  BY FAR the most important consideration.  Deciding where best to place 20,000 activists is a numbers game.  New Hampshire (nearly 1.3 million, and growing rapidly) and Idaho (1.3 million) simply have too many people for 20,000 to tilt the scales, relative to Delaware (800K).  On this alone, Delaware deserves the nod over those two states.

2) Coastline: ESSENTIAL for a state seeking independence and autonomy.  Wilmington is one of the most important ports in the country.  On this alone, Delaware deserves the nod over Montana and Wyoming.

3) Economics: The FSP is ALL ABOUT economics, and NO OTHER STATE can match Delaware's economic potential.  Delaware has the best job market of the candidate states, and is very business-friendly (http://delaware.gov/yahoo/Business).  It is a corporate haven, and UNIQUELY positioned to attract new and existing companies.  This CANNOT be overstated.  It is within commuting distance of job-centers like Philly and Baltimore.  Its long coastline provides intrinsic opportunity in the fishing, boating, tourist, and import-export industries.  It is the FRIENDLIEST state to retirees (http://moneycentral.msn.com/articles/retire/basics/9838.asp).  And Delaware has the highest income per capita of ANY state in the WHOLE U.S., fostering economic opportunities for FSers and a populace adverse to wealth redistribution.

4) Climate: To attract another 15,000 (and more) libertarians to the FS, it would help SIGNIFICANTLY if the state chosen doesn't suffer thru brutal winters.  Delaware’s the only state on the list that fits that description.  (It's also easier to campaign and do outreach when the temperature's not subzero.)

5) Small Size:  Although a deterrent to many FS members, think about it.  In a tiny state like Delaware, organizing, meeting, campaigning and ASSIMILATING is MUCH easier and cheaper.

6) Location:  Proximity to DC and other media centers is a GOOD thing.  In Montana or Idaho, we will be dismissed and ignored as "right-wing militia types" and isolationists.  The media won't be able to do that in Delaware.  We're too close to home.  We will get attention, and our libertarian model will get a spotlight.  Isn't that what we want?  Isn't that what we CRAVE?  Isn't that necessary to gain support, and spread freedom?  We NEED this experiment to take place DIRECTLY beneath the noses of the eastern media elite establishment.

Also, these population centers ARE WHERE THE PEOPLE ARE.  This is where more LIBERTARIANS are.  If we hope to attract 15,000 more of them, this is where our best chance lies.  The other states are too remote to draw the necessary numbers.

The major knock on Delaware is “lack of libertarian culture”.  This notion that ANY state’s “libertarian culture” is significantly greater than any other is an exaggeration.  Modern transportation, telecommunications (folks, everyone in 2003 gets CNN and MTV) and the fact that people move frequently have lessened the differences between states' cultures.  Culture doesn't matter so much because the culture in EVERY state is VERY far from what we want it to be. Some states are clearly "more libertarian" than others, but even these states are not very libertarian at all compared to what we would consider to be ideal.

For every Delaware "statist sentiment", I could list one for any other candidate state.  And for every "freedom sentiment" cited by another, I could list one for Delaware (www.usatoday.com/news/graphics/statefinances/flash.htm).  It gets us nowhere.  And it says next to NOTHING about ANY state's "political culture", as most folks don't vote.  It only speaks to what Republicrats in office have been able to ram thru to serve themselves and a few special interests, usually AGAINST the sentiment of most citizens.

Assimilation is the job ahead of us in whichever state we choose.

Delaware has SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE (www2.newszap.com/area/delaware.html): a high quality of life (www.state.de.us/dedo/new_web_site/Publications/databook_2002/Quality%20of%20Life.htm), quaint colonial villages, good farmland, isolated rural areas, state wildlife areas and forests, hunting, beautiful beaches, state parks, small cities and culture.  Check it out, and do the SMART thing for the FSP – vote DELAWARE.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2003, 04:28:22 pm by Gary Snyder »
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #34 on: July 04, 2003, 05:18:55 pm »

DELAWARE

by Gary Snyder (delaware@garysnyder.org)

Am I the only that counted over 650 words in the above essay?  I am not including sources.  I thought they could only be 500 words.  Can I make my Vermont essay over 650 words, also?

FreedomRoad:  Thanks for your help in moderating this thread.

Gary:  Please edit your original post to 500 words or less by July 8th.  

Any opening statements exceeding the 500-word limit will incur a word-for-word penalty in the closing statement.  A 650-word opening would limit you to a 350-word closing, if left unedited.

Anyone exceeding 1500 words total for the opening, rebuttal, and closing will be ineligible in the vote for the winner of the debate.

Thanks to all for your cooperation.
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Gary Snyder

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2003, 11:17:39 pm »

Craft_6,

The length of my opening statement reflects you not coming down on the first opening statement
posted, which exceeded 600 words.

Regardless,  I'll limit the combined number of words of my three statements to 1,500 or less.

Gary
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #36 on: July 05, 2003, 12:51:52 pm »

Craft_6,

The length of my opening statement reflects you not coming down on the first opening statement
posted, which exceeded 600 words.

Regardless,  I'll limit the combined number of words of my three statements to 1,500 or less.

Gary

Azurecanine:  You've been busted, too -- I count 604 words for your opening SD statement....

Since opening statements aren't due until July 8th, both could be edited down to 500 words by then.

For a quick word count, copy statements to Microsoft Word, then select Tools and Word Count.

Gary:  Sorry for not catching that earlier -- I was hoping this thread would be self-policing.
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Quincy

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2003, 01:00:23 am »

Greetings, fellow liberty lovers and essayists

How about if everyone includes their word count (not including references and headline/author name/ address) at the bottom of their essay. That will keep us conscious of our word limits and inspire editing for brevity.

I'd enjoy seeing your physical location (city and state) mentioned along with your headline.

Quincy
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2003, 08:34:49 am »

How about if everyone includes their word count (not including references and headline/author name/ address) at the bottom of their essay. That will keep us conscious of our word limits and inspire editing for brevity.

I'd enjoy seeing your physical location (city and state) mentioned along with your headline.

Reminder:  Opening statements are due by 11:30 EDT, Tuesday, July 8th.  The limit is still 500 words.  

Those statements which have been posted already and exceeded the limit should be edited down to 500 words by the deadline.  Any overage will count against the word limit on the closing statement.  Anyone exceeding 1500 words on all three statements will be ineligible in the vote to determine who won the debate.

The purpose of this debate is for each state to have an equal chance to make its case, and to question the other states.  There are dozens of other threads if you have more to say about your state.

Thanks again to all volunteers for your participation.
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2003, 02:22:14 pm »

I do not understand what you are saying, at all.  Please make this clear.  What are you saying?

How many words can be in the opening statement?
What happens if we have more?
How does that relate to other statements?

For example, what would happen if the opening statement for VT had 600 words?
Could the rebutal still have 400 words and the closing still have 500 words?  You have to make this clear.

The rules were clear initially (500 words max in each statement), then the first two posts violated them.  If a sense of fair play does not constrain the participants, I can do little to change that.

My preferred solution is for SD and DE to edit their opening statements down to 500 words, since they still have time to do so.

If opening statements exceed 500 words, the overage gets deducted from the closing statement.  

Example:

Opening, 600 words (fait accompli)
Rebuttal: still has 500 word limit
Closing:  limit would be cut to 400 words, unless opening is edited to 500 words by the deadline for posting opening statments

Deducting any overage from the closing is a more effective penalty.  No one should construe my earlier post about a 1500 word maximum for all three statements to mean they could write a 500-word opening, a 200-word rebuttal and an 800-word closing, for instance.

Please stay within the original rules.  I apologize for any confusion I may have contributed.  
« Last Edit: July 07, 2003, 02:23:24 pm by craft_6 »
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate, Maine
« Reply #40 on: July 07, 2003, 08:30:21 pm »

MAINE

Joe:  I count 499 words.  Outstanding!
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craft_6

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #41 on: July 07, 2003, 10:00:13 pm »

A final reminder, that opening statements are due by 11:30 PM EDT, Tuesday, July 8th.

South Dakota, Delaware, and Maine are already up, although SD and DE are still over the 500-word limit.  (You may edit your own posts by selecting the "Modify" button at the top.)  Please note that opening statements over 500 words will have the overage deducted from the 500-word closing statement limit.  (Rebuttals will still have a 500-word limit.)
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Karl

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #42 on: July 07, 2003, 11:37:38 pm »

The Case for North Dakota

LAND AND ECOLOGY

North Dakota is situated along the Canadian border between Montana to the west and Minnesota to the east, and South Dakota to the south.

Geographically, North Dakota is a big state – more than 44 million acres.  Of that, an astounding 40 million acres are under cultivation; among the largest crops are wheat, barley and sunflower seeds.  It has the 3rd most privately-owned land of any state, more than enough for any free stater to own very large plots of inexpensive raw land, should they so choose.  Most of the uncultivated land is green grassland, with ample game, including bighorn sheep, whitetail and mule deer, antelope, moose, birds and waterfowl.

WEATHER

North Dakota’s cold winters are an oft-cited disadvantage.  Although its weather is best characterized as rapidly changing extremes, instead of simply bad, it compares favorably with some northeastern candidate states, with mild and comfortable summers, plenty of sunshine and low humidity.

POPULATION

North Dakota’s most significant advantage is its low population.  At about 642,000, only Wyoming and Alaska are smaller.  With this lower population, 20,000 people might have a more direct influence on the vote, thus more sway in electing liberty-friendly candidates into office.

North Dakota’s population growth has been very low for decades.  Over the next 20 years, it is expected to grow by only 9,000 people.  This situation is perceived as so desperate, it has spawned ill-conceived ideas such as the New Homestead Act. The Free State Project could offer North Dakota a vital influx of new people.  This low population growth is important as we progress with our reforms, since we can be reasonably assured that the in-migration is mostly pro-liberty.

ECONOMY

North Dakota has been trying to diversify their economy lately, with hi-tech businesses setting up shop in its largest city, Fargo, where its business-friendly policies contrast with those of neighboring Minnesota.

POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

The overwhelming majority of North Dakota’s legislators and its governor are Republicans, suggesting that the state may tend toward fiscal conservatism.  Indeed, this is backed up by the fact that North Dakota has one of the smallest governments of the candidate states.  Additionally, it has referendums and initiatives, as well as term limits for the legislature and governor.  This can give our activists a great deal of power in directly influencing state law and preventing political entrenchment.  Finally, it has the least expensive campaigns of any other candidate state.

It is sometimes obvserved that North Dakota receives a disproportionate amount of Federal money.  However, the impact of this money on most citizens is unclear, and may be minimal, since much of this money may be in the form of large farm subsidies that benefit primarily large agribusiness operations.  Free staters may have more leeway on this issue than is immediately obvious.

20,000 enterprising liberty lovers could make a significant and immediate mark on North Dakota, both politically and economically.  It should be given serious consideration as an alternative to Wyoming, South Dakota, or Montana.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2003, 08:35:34 am by Karl »
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Rearden

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #43 on: July 07, 2003, 11:59:10 pm »

The Many Advantages of New Hampshire

Libertarian-leaning population:
• Residents actively searching for education alternatives
• Exploding homeschool population
• “Tax Me More” fund for those who want higher taxes
• Demonstrated hatred of taxes
• Least restrictive gun laws in the nation
• No motorcycle helmet law
• No seatbelt law
• No mandatory car insurance law
• Nation’s first elected openly gay bishop (Episcopalian)
• “Live Free or Die” Motto

Election Advantages:
• One rep per 3089 citizens.  Districts begin at 2987.
• Fusion, making multi-member districts easier than single-member districts!
• Two-year election cycle for the entire state government
• Nonpartisan local elections
• Compact size makes campaigning easy
• Over a third of voters are registered Independents!
• History of electing and re-electing Libertarians
• Highest density of FSP members in the nation
• Highest number of elected libertarians among the ten candidate states
• Highest density of LP members in the nation
• Lots of libertarian Republicans already in office
• First-in-the-nation primary will give the FSP national prominence
• 100% paper ballots
• Local town meetings, giving citizens line-item veto power over budgets!
• Executive Council provides unique stepping stone to governor’s office

Financial Advantages:
• Lowest overall tax burden NATIONWIDE
• No sales tax
• No income tax (dividends and interest over $2400/yr only)
• No capital gains taxes
• No inventory tax
• No tax on machinery or equipment

Smallest State Government:
• Smallest state budget, per capita
• Smallest federal dependence of the ten candidate states.  All other states besides DE get a net benefit from DC.
• Smallest number of government employees, per capita
• Tied for lowest percentage of NEA/AFT members

Friends Already in Power:
• FSP member already in the state legislature
• FSP member already appointed by the governor to the Efficiency in Government Commission, tasked with cutting $300 million from the smallest state government in the US
• Governor Craig Benson: “Come on up; we’d love to have you!” in meeting with FSP members

NH Constitution contains:
• Right to Revolution
• No requirement for public schools
• Provision for State Sovereignty
• Acknowledgement of Natural Rights
• Prohibits unfunded state mandates on local jurisdictions

Quality of Life:
• Among the ten states, NH has:
    o Highest percentage of high-tech jobs
    o Highest percentage of knowledge jobs
    o Largest amount of venture capital investment
    o Highest per capita income
    o Second to ID for number of new jobs forecast
    o Highest quality of life, according to Morgan Quitno Press
• Lowest poverty rate
• Coastal border, facilitating international trade
• Canadian border, facilitating international trade
• Borders with two FSP candidate states – ME and VT
• Incredibly diverse terrain – ocean, lakes, mountains, forests
• Multitude of charming New England towns
• Lowest crime rate in the US
• Second healthiest state in the US
• Extensive cellular and high-speed internet infrastructure
• Hiking, skiing, snowmobiling, kayaking, hunting, camping, ocean swimming
• Diverse mix of towns, some with less than ten people per square mile



Learn more: http://www.lpnh.org/101-Reasons-Vote-NH.pdf
 
http://www.nhhomeschooling.org/
http://nh.gov/governor/pr03_06_03taxes.html
http://www4.fosters.com/News2003/June2003/June_13/News/reg_co0613b.asp
http://www.iihs.org/safety_facts/state_laws/restrain3.htm
http://usff.com/hldl/frames/50state.html
http://www.episcopalchurch.org/ens/2003-126.html
http://www.courts.state.nh.us/supreme/opinions/2002/0207/house.htm
http://www.nmef.org/state_indirectban_fusion.htm#newhampshire
http://www.gpus.org/documents/vote_reg.html
http://www.lp.org/organization/NH/
http://www.freestateproject.org/member_maps/MembersByState_numbers.htm
http://www.state.nh.us/revenue/gti-rev.htm
http://www.stateline.org/header_facts.do?headerId=58
http://www.taxfoundation.org/pr-fedtaxspendingratio.html
http://www.bls.gov/eag/
http://www.lpnh.org/pr/pr032403.htm
http://www.state.nh.us/constitution/constitution.html
http://www.neweconomyindex.org/states/1999/newhampshire.html
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0104652.html
http://almis.dws.state.ut.us/occ/projections.asp?page=DisplayResults&occ=Total%252C%2520all%2520occupations&sortby=title&area=All&rsPage=5
http://www.morganquitno.com/srml91-03.htm
http://www.stateline.org/fact.do?factId=296901
http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/01cius.htm
http://www.morganquitno.com/hcrank03.htm
http://www.caledonianrecord.com/pages/local_news/story/9ee8cb6cf
http://www.visitnh.gov/todo.html
http://www.lpnh.org/nh-pop-density.htm
« Last Edit: July 08, 2003, 08:53:43 am by Keith Murphy »
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ZuG

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Re:The Great State Debate
« Reply #44 on: July 08, 2003, 01:30:10 am »

Not including the titles or footnotes, I count 494 words for North Dakota and 506 words for New Hampshire.

Tsk, tsk, NH.  ;D
« Last Edit: July 08, 2003, 01:30:26 am by ZuG »
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