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Author Topic: re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education  (Read 2677 times)

scottrk29

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« on: June 13, 2003, 08:45:20 pm »



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   Peeping Tom
« on: Today at 08:17:57pm »    

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      I have been lurking in the bushes and spying on the FSP movement for about six months now.  I think  I am ready to approachmy wife with the proposition of joining except I know there is a huge stumbling block... I have a child that is autistic and receives many of the gov't services I abhor.  I wonder if there has been any brain storming on the idea of privatization of diabled services and how one can be assured that a family member does not lose those services.I realize that after the Free State is well on its way that the free market should fill this void, but I can't imagine impeding my son's progress for my own dream. As was said by Mel Gibson in the Patriot( I know I will butcher this quote ) " I have a family and no longer afford ideals." Sorry to butcher that quote  
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99Percent

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2003, 09:24:58 pm »

Yes, in a Free State you would not count on any kind of government services for your son. However due to the much lower tax burdens, I believe as many libertarians do, that private charity organizations would thrive.

Of the many charities that would be founded, I am sure one would deal with providing assistance to the less fortunate, like your son. Granted, nothing is guaranteed but if such an organization would exist it would have to be many times better than any bureaucratically based organization, because since it is privately funded and competing with other private charities for funds, it would strive to see real results and progress, which would benefit your son much more.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2003, 09:27:07 pm by 99Percent »
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BobW

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2003, 02:55:40 am »

Hi Scott and 99%,

Preface;  I cannot speak for FSP.  I am a supporter but not a signed member as yet.

I personally am involved in "brainstorming" and also involved in delivery of services for certain disabled categories (not autistic; mostly war injuries and diseases).  Both above are current events - not the future.

So much of the government programs are in collapse they depend on us more and more.  

I run into all types of folks who want to assist but the bureaucracy stiffles this.  I'm aware public payrolls are at risk.

99%, the major impediment of private relief societies is not money.  It is government.  The whole situation is in transition now.  When options exist, the patient seeks us and not government.

The private relief society I do volunteer work with is not many times greater than government.  It's just better and we get to ration our resources to help more.  Where we are 100% better than government is additude and support.  That phone call across country to the  patient's child will be madeby us if it helps the situation; locating a relative and all the other aspects of helping someone in a hospital will be accomplished by us - and we're on a small budget!

BobW
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Zack Bass

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2003, 05:59:29 am »

Yes, in a Free State you would not count on any kind of government services for your son. However due to the much lower tax burdens, I believe as many libertarians do, that private charity organizations would thrive.


In a libertarian country, charities and insurance will take care of those situations.

As far as the Free State is concerned, our citizens will still be subject to Federal taxation, and the State can get some of that money back to fund social programs.
You have paid Federal taxes for many years, money that might have been spent on insurance if you had not been forced to depend on the Government to fulfill that function.

So, in the near term, before we take over the State, all programs will proceed as now.
Later, we will change many things, but still must provide for those who have been compromised for so long by the Federal Government's policies.  We won't tax the Free State's citizens for this, and we won't take Federal money with strings attached (seat belts, compulsory education, etc.), but the State can still be involved in getting back some of what the Feds are taking from our citizens.  Medicaid and Medicare are Federal programs, but the States are involved in administering them.  This will not change.
In the long term, if we ever reach the point where we can negotiate with the Feds to reduce the tax they take from us, citizens will be on their own... but by that time there will be good insurance plans and lots of charities.

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scottrk29

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2003, 12:42:13 pm »

     Thank you for your replies. As I was researching the N.H. job market, I found several nonprofit charities that deal with a wide array of disabilities.I was wondering if any of the other candidate states have private services such as these? Thanks for any information.                                                                                                         Scott
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BobW

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re:peeping tom /bad title... Concerns about education
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2003, 11:01:41 pm »

Hi Scott,

Yes, the other states also have these programs.  New Hampshire is well-established and sophisticated.  

Of course living on Attu Island is not the same as Anchorage.

Wyoming has private services also.  I 'm active in Disabled American Veterans ("DAV"), performing mostly legislative work but also assist at medical centers.

The others are "out there".

Do some basic searches.  If necessary write to the state capitols.  There are many lists of private sector agencies.

NB: DAV doesn't consider itself a charity.  We're a service organization just throwing back some efforts into the pool.


BobW
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