Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Peeping Tom  (Read 2886 times)

scottrk29

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18
  • I'm a llama!
Peeping Tom
« on: June 13, 2003, 07:17:57 pm »

      I have been lurking in the bushes and spying on the FSP movement for about six months now. :o I think  I am ready to approachmy wife with the proposition of joining except I know there is a huge stumbling block... I have a child that is autistic and receives many of the gov't services I abhor. :-\ I wonder if there has been any brain storming on the idea of privatization of diabled services and how one can be assured that a family member does not lose those services.I realize that after the Free State is well on its way that the free market should fill this void, but I can't imagine impeding my son's progress for my own dream. As was said by Mel Gibson in the Patriot( I know I will butcher this quote ) " I have a family and no longer afford ideals." Sorry to butcher that quote
Logged

Antiacus

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 20
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2003, 10:22:06 pm »

Hi Scott
Can you tell me a little more about the every-day realities of having an autistic child?  Also, what kind of services are you getting from federal or state funds/agencies to help?  Sorry if i'm prying, but i'm genuinely concerned about this kind of issue with regards to the real life practicalities of transitioning from a relatively socialist society.

Thanks, and Godspeed
-Antiacus
Logged

cathleeninsc

  • Guest
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2003, 08:27:30 am »

I just want to reiterate that while most of us don't want  a government response to your needs, we also don't want you or your child to lack for resources. If I understood your needs better, I would personally do what I could as your free state neighbor to improve your situation.

Cathleen in SC
Logged

onyx_goddess

  • FSP Participant
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 227
  • Choking Screams Their Liquid Dreams
    • Robestone
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2003, 08:40:37 am »

I want to try and contribute a little to this discussion by very briefly relating my experience (and my wife's experience, and brother's too) with working with companies that run group homes for people with developmental disabilities.  We worked for different companies, but we pretty much saw the same things.  I'm going to just bullet a few points, and if anyone finds them interesting, I can elaborate.

1) These were private companies, but were very intertwined with government money
2) There was a lot of wasted money - we had to spend it or lose it, so it was like, oh, why don't you go get a brand new 1000 dollar bed?
3) The group home paradigm was working towards as much independence in the residents as possible, but many efforts in that direction were stifled by goverment regulations.

Okay, sum it up - the companies were decent, but the government involvement was always bad.
Logged
Happiness is fleeting
When your heart is barely beating

LisaLew

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 82
  • liberty--is it a state of mind?
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2003, 10:32:56 am »

When I volunteered in a brain injury rehab facility I saw alot of what onyx is referring to.  You see the same with lots of different places that taking in gov't money.  Look at local and state services-- they buy all this stuff at the end of their fiscal year, just so as to not loose any money in the next budget year.

Back to Scott's question.  It would be difficult, however not impossible, to receive similar services that your family receives now.  Maybe something that might be helpful is  a voluntary skill database that members could utilize.  Then you and and your wife could locate people who have the skills you need to help your family. It could even help you decide where to locate your family, I would think. One thing that would be freeing in FS is that people would be better able to come up with different ways to exchange servies.  If people wanted to barter, had affordable insurance so as to pass the savings on to customers, could refuse to participate in insurances, if they wanted to accept cash only-- oh the list is endless.  I would think that it could only look up for your family.  However, it is a huge step to take on a large "maybe."
Logged

scottrk29

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18
  • I'm a llama!
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2003, 11:14:23 am »

               Thankyou all for your input.Antiacus I am fortunate in regards to my son, autism runs on a spectum ( autism describes many different diagnoses that are all related classic autism,persuasive developmental disorder,asperger's...) and my son is closer to typical than most.The services that he does receive are occupational and speech therapies.He receives these services in public school three times a week .His classroom is also run by teachers that specialize in developmental disorders; the class is a mix of typical( children that are right at the specified age level) and children with a wide range of disabilities.  My wife and I use a reasonable approach to this issue, making sure that his services are provided and that he is making progress. [We have heard stories of parents getting grants from the school budget to pay for horseback riding lessons,babysitters so that parents can have a break,and excessive testing of their child( five or six testing sessions a year) on top of the services administered in school.]My wife and I also have secured outside services (nonschool) for my son(occupational and speech). We use our insurance for the first two months of sessions but when that runs out we do turn to state health insurance to supplement the rest.We pay a higher premium for this insurance than most people on state insurance but it is a handout we can not turn down when outside services cost $200 for a half hour at this facility.I understand the economic theory that when gov't subsidies are eliminated from these areas prices would drop and then stablize but that would not happen overnight.This is the conundrum that people face when they have disabilities or children with disabilities; services are very expensive because of gov't           subsidies, but the time for the market correction after the absence of these subsidies could be too long for the disabled.
Logged

ZuG

  • FSP Participant
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 313
Re:Peeping Tom
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2003, 06:15:36 pm »

I dealt with an autistic person in my school (well, technically, she had aspergers). It was an interesting experience. The thing that always bothered me was that the teachers around her were deluded into thinking that she was making progress, when it was clear to all of the students that any progress made was so small as to not make a practical difference.

I fear what would happen to your child if they were put into public schools as she was. Elyse got tormented by her peers on a daily basis, was forced to deal with hoards of people she couldn't hope to understand, and finally developed a passive-agressive tendancy toward her classmates. She was moved to a different school (she was with us from 5-11th grades), finally, but the lack of progress (and possible damage) caused by being surrounded by children who neither understood her plight nor cared will have serious ramifications.

So, I can definately understand you wishing help with the tremendous costs. Having seen the results of sticking them in public schools, I definately empathize.

The point? Oh, there was supposed to be a point?  ;D
Logged
Before you post that comment, think. The people you are talking to will soon be your neighbors. Would you talk to your neighbor in the way you are talking to those on the forum?
Pages: [1]   Go Up