Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: Building a House  (Read 7431 times)

rossby

  • Director of Development
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4801
Re: Building a House
« Reply #15 on: February 16, 2010, 09:54:36 am »

130,000 is about what we could afford to finance.

The "f" word...

If you're going to finance but want to use a "funky design", you'll likely have a harder time obtaining financing. Banks don't like to secure loans with "non-marketable" properties. Be prepared to run a gauntlet.

... or just save more money. ;)
Logged

MaineShark

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5044
Re: Building a House
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2010, 10:00:30 am »

Yea, I was kinda feeling that Joe (the update thing.)  I'm in the South where housing prices are a bit lower than up there ;)  I've been looking at houses in the lower part of NH online for about a year and find a lot that are in my price range, just old.  I can definitely do improvements as I go...

The fiance says to do the dome later and buy a place first and just go from there.  :)

You can also find a place that maybe needs some paint or new flooring or such.

Of if you're adventurous, there are some shells out there where folks gutted a place in preparation of a total remodel, then ran out of funds and lost the house to the bank.  Now the bank owns an empty shell, which they have to sell for very little money because it's not a livable house.  If you're handy, or can qualify for a construction loan, there are some great deals like that.

There are some deals like that well under $100k (some under $50k) around here.

There's also a mobile home on 2.25 acres near Harvey Lake that would be toward the upper end of your price range.  But that's enough acreage to build something larger, down the road.

Joe
Logged
"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

We are not civilized because we are armed; we are armed because we are civilized..

Ed

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 728
Re: Building a House
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2010, 10:15:14 am »

       *Block is nearly-unusable in NH, for groundwater and frost reasons.  Nothing like having the frost crumble the foundation of your new house...

Really? We have plenty of frost here in NJ but block works fine. Even in the rocky mountainous area here in the northeast part. I'm talking about going down past the frost line, even if it's just a crawlspace. Even with a slab you should have the edges/footing go down past the frost line.
Logged

MaineShark

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5044
Re: Building a House
« Reply #18 on: February 16, 2010, 04:50:47 pm »

       *Block is nearly-unusable in NH, for groundwater and frost reasons.  Nothing like having the frost crumble the foundation of your new house...

Really? We have plenty of frost here in NJ but block works fine. Even in the rocky mountainous area here in the northeast part. I'm talking about going down past the frost line, even if it's just a crawlspace. Even with a slab you should have the edges/footing go down past the frost line.

Frost line is five to seven feet, here, depending upon where in NH you are.

Joe
Logged
"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

We are not civilized because we are armed; we are armed because we are civilized..

Ed

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 728
Re: Building a House
« Reply #19 on: February 16, 2010, 05:40:31 pm »

five to seven feet? Holy crap. No wonder.

So slab isn't even an option then, is it? Unless you want to risk frost heave.
Logged

MaineShark

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5044
Re: Building a House
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2010, 05:45:18 pm »

Slabs are used in garages and such.  They need to be reinforced, and can still crack.  Generally, you need to do a short footer ("frost wall"), at least.  There are some funky techniques using buried "walls" made of foam insulation that serve to keep the frost out, as well.

However, given that the basement is more energy-efficient than the above-ground rooms, and is generally taxed less (first floor has the highest impact on property valuation; basements and upper floors are valued lower per square foot), it makes good sense to do a full basement, and furnish it as living space.

Joe
Logged
"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

We are not civilized because we are armed; we are armed because we are civilized..

mike888777

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 290
Re: Building a House
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2010, 10:25:04 pm »

To the OP, definitely do not buy a house if you are thinking about $. Housing prices will continue to decline for the next few years and you should wait and take advantage of that.
Logged
For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. John 3:16

Floridian

  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 321
  • Friend of FSP
Re: Building a House
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2010, 10:09:13 am »

So we have been looking and looking at houses and everything in our price range is just... old.  Which to me seems like it will cost an arm and a leg in electricity and heating, no?  So we found this geodesic dome home idea and it looks amazing!

Does anyone have any experience with this?  I'm love to know...

Old isn't so bad.  I prefer pre-1960-70's construction.  Seems like the materials and workmanship had more integrity back then.  Older homes are often in the better locations because people had more choices of vacant sites to build on.  Try to find a house that has not been remodeled very much so you don't have to fix others' mistakes.  Financially, it makes good sense to buy an older house and fix it up.  You can make improvements over time as the budget permits.  You might even get lucky and find a home with real character.

Building something new can be pretty overwhelming with a lot of expensive permanent decisions to make in a relatively short period of time. 

One last bit of advice on fixing up a house:  Use the absolute best top-of-the line paint available.  Cheap paint is no bargain. :) 

     
« Last Edit: February 17, 2010, 10:14:22 am by Floridian »
Logged
Tu ne cede malis.

MaineShark

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5044
Re: Building a House
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2010, 11:14:34 am »

One last bit of advice on fixing up a house:  Use the absolute best top-of-the line paint available.  Cheap paint is no bargain. :)

Actually, I'd say to concentrate on the "buried" items, if there's anything that must be top of the line at the expense of other things.  If you need to repaint, you can.  If you skimp on insulation (for one example), you're pretty much stuck with it for the next few decades, at least.

Joe
Logged
"An armed society is a polite society" - this does not mean that we are polite because we fear each other.

We are not civilized because we are armed; we are armed because we are civilized..

JuzamDjinn

  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: Building a House
« Reply #24 on: March 05, 2010, 11:11:32 am »

Logged

maxxoccupancy

  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3659
  • Evil prevails when good men don't vote Libertarian
    • fija.org
Re: Building a House
« Reply #25 on: March 05, 2010, 02:33:31 pm »

I had this idea of forming a kind of Build Guild.  New members would learn how to build homes and buildings by joining.  You participate by helping to put together lodges and housing for fellow members.  Eventually, you learn wiring, plumbing, cabinet making, roofing, etc., everything that you would need to know in order to build a house.  The point being that members would become self-sufficient in time, and that new folks could be brought in to the group, performing work instead of paying tuition. 

New members would also gain a trade that lets them earn a living anywhere they go in life.  There would also be a fraternal organization to help them out--or their family--wherever they go.
Logged
If you are interested in putting together an IT-creative firm to help provide jobs for liberty folks in the future, send me a Personal Message.
"The Free State Project is an agreement among 20,000 pro-liberty activists to move to New Hampshire, where they will exert the fullest practical effort toward the creation of a society in which the maximum role of government is the protection of life, liberty, and property."

JordanRHughes

  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9
Re: Building a House
« Reply #26 on: May 04, 2010, 05:24:48 pm »

There's great info here. I'd like to follow this thread. Thanks for sharing.

Jordan.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
 

anything