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Poll

Is there a market for a private, pro-liberty post-secondary school (college, university, etc.) in New Hampshire?

Yes
- 21 (72.4%)
No
- 4 (13.8%)
Uncertain; explanation below.
- 4 (13.8%)

Total Members Voted: 27


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Author Topic: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?  (Read 52488 times)

Luck

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Liberty College
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2010, 10:32:53 pm »

* I was wondering where my thread went. They tend to disappear lately.
* I think I'll ask the anarchists to help get the college started first. I don't have much of a profit motive myself and I don't plan to emphasize that. I think it needs to emphasize achieving liberty. I don't think the U.S. founders had much of a profit motive, but they had great success, despite things not going perfectly most of the time, since their first successes.
* I'm thinking the college can evolve out of an offshoot from Taproom Tuesdays. How's that for a plan?
« Last Edit: February 25, 2010, 10:34:43 pm by Luck »
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rossby

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Re: Starting Liberty College in NH
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2010, 07:33:49 pm »

* I want to start a college in Manchester asap to teach how to achieve Liberty. I want to teach Libertarianism, U.S. & world history, politics, history of religion, mythology, philosophy, relationships, health, self-defense, science, tech etc.

1) Why?

Not directed at me, but...

Currently, there is a lack of social institutions. If we expect things to persist and grow, we must create those institutions. I'm not suggesting teaching a "libertarian" curriculum. I'm talking about a libertarian environment.

For example, Liberty University (not to to be confused with libertary as in libertarianism). All joking aside, they at least understand that to remain relevant, you must exert effort to build reliable and credible social institutions. Libertarians have few things like that to call our own.
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Luck

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Liberty College Introduction
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2010, 02:51:33 pm »

BACKGROUND - I had 3 years of conventional college toward a teaching degree. In one class it was stated that there are two teaching styles: planned and spontaneous. Spontaneous is the style I preferred, but, when I started my first student teaching class, the planned style was the only one offered. So I withdrew from my remaining classes and decided that, if I wanted to teach, I could do it in a free school of some kind. Now I'm attempting to start a free school, whose objective is to teach how to achieve Liberty.
- In the 1980s I read some of John Holt's books and magazines and was persuaded that his assessment of conventional education was largely correct, that the purposes of compulsory education are to provide cheap babysitting, to keep kids from competing with adults for jobs and to program kids for slots in conventional society, in which kids of the rich get the best jobs and kids of the poor get the worst jobs, in a manner that appears superficially to be fair to all. His book, Instead of Education, was probably the best one for explaining this.

SCHOOL PRISONS - Compulsory education is unjust imprisonment. I was painfully aware of my imprisonment and the unfairness of it when I was a student, but the abusive nature of it wasn't clear to me till I read Holt. Kids need to learn self-direction and self-sufficiency in order to mature socially and to pursue happiness, as is their right. Imprisonment in schools greatly delays or prevents this. Kids need to choose their own education and to have advisors available to them to help them choose it more productively. Parents need to understand that every course of study kids normally are exposed to in compulsory education can be taught without outside teachers. The internet makes conventional teachers largely irrelevant, as it makes much more information available. Although grade school and high school are called compulsory, the law generally has loopholes for any parents who do not want to send their kids to school prisons.

LEARNING - Teaching is one of the best ways to learn, so I want Liberty College to provide plenty of opportunity for students to teach or demonstrate whatever they want to. The first thing I want to try with Liberty College is weekly "fun times", where students and the public are invited to speak or perform for 3 minutes each. If it lasts 60 or 90 minutes, 20 to 30 people could have turns. There may also be longer time segments available afterward for more in-depth classes. I want to get everything videoed and posted to Youtube etc and all the speeches on computer files to be posted on a website in order to get a wider audience and to inspire similar projects everywhere, as well as to help organize knowledge & make it accessible.

ADVANTAGES - I want Liberty College to be a resource for anyone of any age. Kids and adults of any age could enroll in any classes. The college could serve as an alternative to compulsory schooling. I hope some of the advantages of Liberty College will be that:
1. Students are not subjected to negative peer pressure or the stress of competing for grades or of feeling imprisoned;
2. Students learn as fast as they want or at their own pace;
3. Grades reflect specific knowledge and skills, not temporary memorization, and tests are given individually and only when the student is ready;
4. Classes are cheap and can be paid with donations, loans, or barter;
5. The college will help students get apprenticeship jobs or start businesses while learning.

JOBS/COURSES - The kinds of jobs they could get at the college are: teaching, politics, ministry, business, accounting, management, marketing, self-defense, security, consulting, arts, writing, editing, computer tech, alternative health professions, parent/guardian training, horticulture, mechanics, construction, alternative science etc. My idea is for the college to make arrangements with appropriate local people to apprentice students for 3 to 6 months or more or to make students partners in various kinds of business etc. As apprentices students would work for little or no pay, but mainly just for the experience.
- Subjects under ministry would include: mythology; history of religion; world history; psychology & consciousness; morality & the Ten Commandments; health; knowledge; relationships; parenting; starting a church etc.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2010, 03:13:42 pm by Luck »
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Dreepa

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2010, 02:52:06 pm »

still say it is too soon.

There are not enough students to make it viable.
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Luck

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2010, 03:06:58 pm »

Maybe too soon for you, not me.
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rossby

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2010, 03:14:05 pm »

Maybe too soon for you, not me.

If you have operating costs, you need to meet those.
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creaganlios

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2010, 08:52:06 pm »

You seem to go back and forth between criticizing high schools and compulsory education and 'planned' teaching plans on the one hand...and then offering a 'college' on the other hand.  How does the latter respond to your frustrations with the former?  Do you want an alternative high school, or a college?

Thom
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Dreepa

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2010, 09:15:43 pm »

Maybe too soon for you, not me.
correct it is too soon for me.  (or for anyone wanting to make a living off of it.)
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Luck

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« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2010, 12:45:22 pm »

Quote
Do you want an alternative high school, or a college? Thom
* I want a college that's open to anyone of any age who can read etc, with the college's purpose being to teach how to achieve liberty. There's no reason it couldn't serve as an alternative school, for anyone who wants that, it seems to me.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 12:47:04 pm by Luck »
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creaganlios

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Re: Liberty College
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2010, 07:10:34 pm »


Quote
I want a college that's open to anyone of any age who can read etc, with the college's purpose being to teach how to achieve liberty. There's no reason it couldn't serve as an alternative school, for anyone who wants that, it seems to me.

OK, well what you're moving towards is the Minnesota model, where any academically qualified high school student can spend the last two years of high school in a college (BTW, the state $ that would normally go to the public high school is used towards the students college tuition).  The credits earned while in college count towards both the students college degree and their high school credits/diploma.

Having said that, you wrote quite a bit about public schools being prisons, etc....so, if you want to address the brutal high school situation, are you suggesting becoming recognized as a high school?  Having students  enroll in high school but arrange to teach courses at your college (and somehow convincing school authorities that your non-accredited school is valid?)  Or are you looking at having students declare they are Home schooling for high school, and then offering your college courses as 'enrichment?' (this last option probably being the least problematic).

Again, I'm not opposed to your idea:  I am simply trying to get you to focus on a specific, realistic goal.
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Luck

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« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2010, 08:57:22 pm »

* I appreciate your discussion. I didn't mean to sound unappreciative, if that's how I sounded.
* I doubt if I'll ever care about getting state accreditation of any kind. If any parents or their kids want to use the college as an alternative to compulsory schooling, I think the college will be able to do that - not just high school, but any grade.
* My plan may not seem very clear, but I don't think it needs to be real clear. I think I mentioned that my plan is to evolve the college out of "fun times". That's a weekly one or two hour event at which I'll invite people of any age to give 3-minute speeches or performances, in which they can share any knowledge they think is valuable, or they can get practice at public speaking or performing.
* I hope I'll be comfortable enough to speak there [at fun times event] myself briefly about the plan to evolve the college and to explain its purpose a bit and ask for students, teachers and members for the Board of Directors.
* My first step will be to ask Murphy's Taproom about doing the weekly event there. I want to get at least parts of the weekly event videoed and uploaded to sites like Youtube.

Quote
If you have operating costs, you need to meet those. B.D.
* I overlooked your comment earlier. Since I hope the college will be able to evolve, I'm guessing that there won't be much of operating costs. I had a lot of experience with 12 Step groups and they survive with minimal operating costs, so I hope the college can do similarly, at least in the beginning.
* I tried to start a similar kind of school about 2 years ago. At that time I was hoping to hire someone to do fundraising to cover expenses and I wanted the person doing fundraising to raise enough to pay their own salary, at least after a few months. I actually hired one guy, but he didn't do what I asked him to do, so I let him go quickly. But I had discussed the idea with several applicants and we almost tried it out. But then I decided to move to NH to try out the FSP [last year]. So now I want to try both at once.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2010, 09:17:36 pm by Luck »
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BigJoe

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2010, 01:08:53 pm »

like the basic premise.  Although it seems like your not sure of who exactly will be signing up for this college and what would be their reasoning to do so?  Now I don't know much about anything, but I would think you could have better luck selling it as a supplement to juniors and seniors in high school as well as to home schooled teens.  I would suggest only offering two courses at a time, each with two lectures a week (90-120 min) in the evenings for 8-12 weeks, and then start again with two new courses right after.  Offering an attendance track and a 'degree' track, so some could pay to just come and learn and listen(probably more attractive to the post-college people who just want to learn), while others could pay to take the courses more actively and write papers and receive grades and eventually a diploma (successfully pass 10 courses or something).

I have no idea how hard it would be to gain official status, and be allowed to have your courses count as official credits in public high schools in NH, sounds very difficult, although it would massively increase the perceived legitimacy of the school in the eyes of parents.  I think an easier goal would be to get recognition from Universities that they see the Liberty School of NH degree as a sign of a student going beyond what is expected and taking their education in their own hands.  This would probably involve a legit looking website and a packet of some kind showing what the students had to do in order to earn the degree.  I think at worst, college admissions people would have to see it as a strong commitment to extra-curricular activities (and a learning based one at that).  So even if they don't think too much of the material or how hard it was to earn a good grade at the school, they have to be impressed by the time commitment, and passion to learn of the students.
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teacher424

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2010, 09:29:53 pm »

I'm new to this forum, so hi everyone!  I agree with Thom S-- I'd try to tap into Hillsdale.  Don't reinvent the wheel if you don't have to.  Can I teach there?
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LiftsBoxes

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2010, 04:16:50 pm »

I think we would get further offering additional instruction and tutors to homeschoolers.
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CurtHowland

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Re: A Private Pro-Liberty School in New Hampshire?
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2010, 04:11:02 pm »

I think we would get further offering additional instruction and tutors to homeschoolers.

That is exactly what I thought reading this thread.

There are so many resources for "structured" instruction. As an example, Mises University and the new online-only Mises Acadamy http://academy.mises.org

Was it Stanford or MIT that was putting all if its courses online for people who wanted to study without bothering to get a degree?
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