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Author Topic: The bottomline for my father  (Read 20284 times)

cathleeninnh

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2009, 01:25:21 pm »

Did you get in touch with Bob Hull? Very important if looking for reasonable priced land!
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2009, 01:45:22 pm »

I can find a HUGE list of properties in Maine that are more than reasonably priced, and quite a few in Vermont, but when the parameters are limited to NH, the search turns up almost nothing fitting what we want.  This is unbelieveable.  Found one in Maine 200 acres for 49,900! 

What exactly are you looking for? Do you want to build on it, or just have it for hunting/recreation?

Here's 50 acres for 50,000, in cheshire county, which is a high demand area. If you were to go to coos or something I'm sure you could get much larger tracts for cheaper.

http://www.landwatch.com/Cheshire-County-New-Hampshire-Land-for-sale/pid/114686288

I have looked at that piece of land online.  It doesn't have good road access (So another 8-10K having the work done) and unless it just doesn't specify, there's no above ground water source like a creek.  It looks like it has some good trees on it though. 

The intended use for the land is to homestead.  Think Little House on the Prairie meets old man on the mountain.  Our goal has always been to have a little remote cabin, enough gardens for me and dad, and about  50 animals, basically enough resources to cover our needs and have a little left over to barter or sell.

That 200acres in maine would be perfect and is easily affordable at 49,900. Why cant the northern border of NH take in that area :P
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2009, 01:50:57 pm »

Did you get in touch with Bob Hull? Very important if looking for reasonable priced land!

I can't remember if I did now or not!?  I've had so many suggestions of helpful ideas and people to get in touch with that theyre all starting to run together.  If he has a website and I look at it I'll remember if I looked at it already. 
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time4liberty

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2009, 02:11:44 pm »

« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 02:13:48 pm by ttie »
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2009, 02:20:53 pm »

I thought I had just found the perfect one, 26 acres for 26,000 with a creek and then I looked and it was in VT!!!!
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2009, 02:45:29 pm »

Most land listing won't focus on above ground water sources...
Droughts here aren't really a concern... most often its the opposite.

Also land gets higher use zoning restrictions, not agricultural... expcept for maybe municipal ordinance on very small lots.
My land in commercial... so I can do anything from agricultural up to commmercial (just no industrial).

If you intend to sell the extra... remember you may not wish to be too far from the urban market.
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Kate

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #37 on: December 04, 2009, 06:28:14 pm »

Try looking at properties with a camp or trailer on them.  Some times they are the same price as land without buildings. 
You will also avoid the in use issue and extra taxes to take it out of "in use".

Land that has been recently logged will also be cheaper.  You won't have any large trees on it but it won't be clear cut either.

Watch out for swampy areas.  Not only are they "wet lands" that the government gets their panties in bunch if you build on they also tend to flood in the spring, badly.  The best time of year to go shopping is mid spring.  It is know as mud season here in NH.  You will see the land at it's worst and most flooded.  You will also know if you can get in and out on the roads.   Most of the roads up here in the country are not paved.

Look for something on the southern side of the mountain or hill.  It will be much better for farming due to more sunlight.. ( your dad may know all about this.)
The bottom of a valley will hold onto the cold air the longest since it rolls down the hills.  It also floods.  Flooding is an issue all over the state.  Flat is also very hard and pricey to find.

The growing season is much shorter than Kentucky.  Most of the state with affordable land is in zone 4.  That means you have from Memorial day to Mid September without frost. Many people use cold frames and green houses to extend the growing season.   Peanuts, and tobacco, won't grow up here.  Most everything else you can find variates that do well up here.    If can pick up a book called the Vegetable Gardeners Bible by Ed Smith.  He has his garden north west of Grafton in Vermont.   It will give your father a very good idea of how people do things in Northern New England.

NH has sugar maples.  You and your father may want to look into property with sugar maples.  They are the best source of sap for maple syrup.   
Keep in mind the State is 87% Forrest.   
You are going to have more hard woods on the northern sides on the mountains and more conifers on the southern side.  Everywhere has both.
 
As mentioned before Grafton is a good place to take a look.   There are no permits to build there,  a great group of activists, and affordable land. (for NH)
There quite a few gardeners in the Grafton.  I think there is also a nursery owned by a good local in the area.

I do know Bob Hull is interested in helping movers settle in Grafton.   You may be able to rent in the country till you can find the right piece of land to buy.  Quite a few movers have had great success moving here and renting till they found the best place to settle down.  They also saved a great deal of money since they had the time to shop around.

Kate

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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2009, 07:00:20 pm »

Well my land here was about 15 miles away from a town of 4,000 and that would have been a sufficient market for selling excess stuff.  Like I said I took us 3 years to find this property and now we have owned it 3 years.  I wouldn’t be in such a push to find something if dad wasn’t 71, so I have to try to turn a 3 year search this time into a 3-4 month adventure. 

I can’t say it was actually easy in KY, because we probably looked through over 2500 listings online or in advertisements, made inquiries about approx 500 of them, went and looked at about 150, and actually seriously walked over and assessed about 25 properties.  We only found 3 that we wanted in 3 years and the first 2, the sellers were given better offers than we could match. 

So far I’ve seen about 25 in VT and over 100 in Maine that seem to fit the bill without much effort at all.  That’s not as many as having 500 worth looking into, but so far I’ve seen almost  nothing in NH UNLESS I make some major sacrifices.  All 3 of those states are so close so I don’t get it.

I appreciate all the links and suggestions- please do keep sending them because the more listings I have to look at the better the chances of finding one, and the higher chance of getting dad to move with an easy conscience.  Plus it would make me happy too!




Kate, I appreciate greatly the suggestions here.  I’m going to read this stuff to my dad.  He’s been asking quite a few little questions.  He was asking about the growing season the other day.   Dad has this impression of NH that I’m slowly breaking-basically NH is almost to Canada so therefore it has nothing but pine trees and snow :P

Also from what you have described, Grafton sounds a great deal as if I should take it into consideration.  That’s about 30 miles of north of Keene I believe?
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time4liberty

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2009, 07:32:19 pm »

January might not be the best time to visit for the purposes of convincing him that NH isn't all snow ;)

I'm not sure why fewer properties in NH seem to be available. It's certainly true that there are vaster uninhabited areas in Maine and VT. The part of NH that touches Canada is more narrow.

I'd come and check things out in the spring, summer, or fall as well. I doubt you're going to be able to get a great feel for the land, for growing purposes in the winter, but I could be wrong. There are tons of small farms around, so you could probably talk to them and get some insight too.

You should consider growing berries and apple trees as well -- Strawberries, Blueberries, Rasberries, and Blackberries all go nuts in NH.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2009, 07:34:20 pm by ttie »
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Kate

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #40 on: December 04, 2009, 08:30:17 pm »

Due to the winter coming this is the slow season for real estate. 
Most people will wait till after mud season to list a property. 
Summer and fall are the big times to try and sell a place when the foliage is the prettiest.

Check out this thread on the NH free.com
http://nhunderground.com/forum/index.php?topic=19577.msg312533#msg312533

It has some other good suggestions on recourses about gardening in Northern New England.

Kate
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #41 on: December 04, 2009, 09:22:53 pm »

It would be great if I see areas where berries like this grew so I can take pictures or show them to dad if he goes.  We had our property already laid out-where the animals would be, where the berries and fruit trees would be, with the cabin being built in the center of the place. 

Everything I can show him that is similar enough to things here will help convince him.  He tried to change my mind again last night, and acted very sad, but I told him I just couldn’t stay here.  I even turned down a job offer today- I tried for months to get hired at this place because it was close to my farm, and interviewed 2 weeks ago and they emailed me today.  It was something I loved doing too, even if it was statist.  But it’s time to get away from here- this area is just hopeless when it comes to rights and taxes.


Anyway , I’m not worried about how isolated a piece of land is-in fact I prefer it.  As long as there’s just one creek or spring on it that stays watered year round.  Kate suggested  looking at a place that’s been timbered, and that’s not a problem either, as long as the only trees left aren’t all thinner than a baseball bat. 
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Kate

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2009, 10:09:12 pm »

Other than hunting and gardening what does your father love to do? 
I'm sure we can find people for him to meet that share his passions.

Grafton has an advantage of having a good group of people living there that want to do there own thing.  The nice thing for your dad is they are not all a bunch of young guys fresh out of school.  Many of them have retired to Grafton or are working on retiring to Grafton.   They build and renovate buildings, garden,  teach people to shot riffles, have great picnics,  they help make Burning Porcupine happen every year, they are also working on getting rid of zoning in the town and are just a fun bunch of people who quite frankly want to be left alone to live in peace.   It also 35 to 40 minutes away from Hanover /Lebanon so you both can find work. 
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2009, 10:59:15 pm »

Grafton has zoning?
Learn something new every day.
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2009, 11:06:18 pm »

Other than hunting and gardening what does your father love to do? 
I'm sure we can find people for him to meet that share his passions.

Grafton has an advantage of having a good group of people living there that want to do there own thing.  The nice thing for your dad is they are not all a bunch of young guys fresh out of school.  Many of them have retired to Grafton or are working on retiring to Grafton.   They build and renovate buildings, garden,  teach people to shot riffles, have great picnics,  they help make Burning Porcupine happen every year, they are also working on getting rid of zoning in the town and are just a fun bunch of people who quite frankly want to be left alone to live in peace.   It also 35 to 40 minutes away from Hanover /Lebanon so you both can find work. 
Well me and dad are both old people so the fresh out of school crowd wouldn‘t appeal to me either :P  He’s 71 and I’m 28 and have been going on 50 since I was a kid.  I’ve looked at the Keene area for the civil disobedience approach, and that’s probably where I’ll go if I do that- laying down on the ground if the police arrest me etc. 

But from looking at the demographics of Keene as a social scene, it really has nothing to offer me.  I’ve never really fit well with my age group and the friends I have that are in their 20’s also don’t carry themselves as if they are 20 something. 

I’m not a coffee shop or bar type.  I’m not worried about the latest cell phone or where the newest wi-fi spot is in town.  I mostly go to work or walk my dogs.  Dad hunts or works on his guns.  The only thing related to socializing that he usually does is play music.  My socializing is sitting at a friend’s house discussing/arguing points of interest. 

Theres  a large group of his old friends and acquaintances that get together 2-3 times a month and just play (old country and bluegrass)  But he’s getting tired of them because too many know-it-alls are starting to come around.  Dad has an ability that you have to see to believe on guitar and he gets annoyed with people who try to join them and think they know what they’re doing.  He’s been playing about 60 years.

But we share a goal in life which is to homestead, mostly by hand, a piece of land and be as self-sustaining as possible.  As for work, I’d prefer something outdoors but if I like what I see in NH I might like to rethink the idea of teaching.  I believe it was you that said you helped start the gifted school.  I might have a notion to connect with people who want to start a private (liberty driven) school for 13-18 age group.  If that is something that could materialize I would love to be involved. 

It would be a dream come true to actually get to teach REAL social studies, and not the format found in the government schools.  It would be a dream come true to be involved with teachers, parents and advisors who are motivated and for the right reasons.  Education that is more learning driven instead of state driven would be a nice change.


Quote
  who quite frankly want to be left alone to live in peace.   


This has just convinced me that Grafton is going to receive the bulk of my focus for the trip.






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