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Author Topic: The bottomline for my father  (Read 20370 times)

Bazil

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2009, 10:52:24 pm »

I’ve looked all over the place and apparently it’s near impossible to find a collection of easy to read, accurate weather data from previous years.  I thought a few point and clicks would show me the 2008 winter data, but no!  I did happen upon a site called weather underground.com but I question it’s accuracy almost 100% because none of the little month maps I pulled up for the Winchester area showed days that had snowfall last winter. 

Dad said he wasn’t as worried about the cold as much as the nature of timber.  He still actually doesn’t believe me after I reported back to him what Thom S said.  The only thing that will convince him, he said, short of him being in NH when I visit, is for me to take pictures of trees on potential properties.

Dad’s priorities in land are rabbits and squirrels, and having the ability to plant gardens, and those trees I listed.  I have convinced him there’s plenty of small game, but the tree thing he isn’t buying yet.



I don't know what the impression of new england rest of the nation has (never thought to ask) but northern new england has a pretty low population.  NH is a lot like Vermont and Vermont is famous for its maples.  Also plenty of oaks, hickories and such.  Hickory nuts are a little tougher than walnuts but that have a real nice smell.
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freedomroad

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2009, 01:50:50 am »

I don't know much about trees in NH except that NH is famous for Maple syrup from NH maple trees.  There are also plenty of apple trees.  Berries grow very well, too.

As for gardening, it is easy to do in NH.  Compost piles are common, natural fertilizer is common and gardening is too.  Heck, there is gardening at my place.  Much of NH is actually great for gardening.  Also, it seems like every time I turn around another freedom activist is raising chickens.  Other liberty activists have pigs, goats and honey bees.  It is starting to look great for that type of stuff up here.
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Lance

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2009, 02:50:23 am »

As far as the severity of the NH winter goes, it isn't going to be anything like 6 months from what I can tell.  Seems pretty much like a Missouri winter to me so far, even though we're not technically in wintertime yet.  But I'm sure that there will be more snow.

Watch this flick with him to show him a different perspective on winter, plus, it's a cool flick:

Alone in the Wilderness - Part 1 (30 min)
http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/z8w-Jb_DgFY/

Alone in the Wilderness - Part 2 (30 min)
http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/27Of9HvFJlY/

As for timber, these pics aren't much but they were taken recently near Dublin, NH.





And this is near Keene:



I'd say most of the trees in SW NH are deciduous.
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2009, 12:37:01 pm »

As far as the severity of the NH winter goes, it isn't going to be anything like 6 months from what I can tell.  Seems pretty much like a Missouri winter to me so far, even though we're not technically in wintertime yet.  But I'm sure that there will be more snow.



Oh these pics are brilliant.  This looks like it could have been taken right out of our own land! 

Now the only problem is finding property I can afford that looks like that and get it financed.

There has been a lot of nice land that I have seen in NH that I would LOVE to have, but the prices are just way out of my league.  I don't know what other people or how they do it as far as affording the houses and properties in NH, but they are unrealistic to me.  I've never ever made much money, the 56 acres that I own in KY I got for a steal basically, and only have been able to do some things with it because I always work 70-80 hours a week.  For the type of income I have known in my work life, going out to eat at a restaurant that is going to cost $12-15 comes off to me as being just too much money.  So when I see land that runs $1500-2000 an acre or more I'm overwhelmed. 
« Last Edit: November 28, 2009, 12:49:25 pm by kyfornow »
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2009, 12:49:41 pm »

Oh these pics are brilliant.  This looks like it could have been taken right out of our own land! 

Now the only problem is finding property I can afford that looks like that and get it financed.

There has been a lot of nice land that I have seen in NH that I would LOVE to have, but the prices are just way out of my league.  I don't know what other people do or how they do it as far as affording the houses and properties in NH, but they are unrealistic to me.  I've never ever made much money, the 56 acres that I own in KY I got for a steal basically, and only have been able to do some things with it because I always work 70-80 hours a week.  For the type of income I have known in my work life, going out to eat at a restaurant that is going to cost $12-15 comes off to me as being just too much money.  So when I see land that runs $1500-2000 an acre or more I'm overwhelmed. 
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Bazil

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2009, 02:51:59 pm »

The further into the sticks you are the cheaper it is.  Also access has a lot to do with it too.  I've seen 60 acres of land for 70 grand before in central NH, and prices are generally cheaper now than they were then.  The thing about the cheap land is it will probably be non-buildable forest land, so you will need to parcel off a piece and get it's status changed.
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time4liberty

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #21 on: November 28, 2009, 04:44:38 pm »

KY, ever heard of New England fall foliage?

Connifers don't change color. ;)







Our property was covered in chipmunks, squirrels, deer, other small critters, and we had quite a sizable garden =).

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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #22 on: November 28, 2009, 05:58:19 pm »

The further into the sticks you are the cheaper it is.  Also access has a lot to do with it too.  I've seen 60 acres of land for 70 grand before in central NH, and prices are generally cheaper now than they were then.  The thing about the cheap land is it will probably be non-buildable forest land, so you will need to parcel off a piece and get it's status changed.

See that presents more than one problem.  I'll have to have land without the restrictions or go into it with the expectation that I'm going to build anyway and say to hell wih the restrictions (because it's my property and I can do what I want with it)

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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2009, 06:01:08 pm »

KY, ever heard of New England fall foliage?

Connifers don't change color. ;)







Our property was covered in chipmunks, squirrels, deer, other small critters, and we had quite a sizable garden =).



That is a pretty place, but do you mind if I ask where you came up with the $3 million to buy it with :P

I appreciate all the good photos from you all.  They did the work of convincing dad of what we could find in NH.  Now the only limitation is finding something that suits us, in our price range.  I finally got him to suggest that we should try and sell our acreage here so we can take the cash we get from it (which will be 20-30K)  to have toward a downpayment on new land.  The only problem is that crappy economy and land market right now, we might be stuck with this acreage indefinitely. 
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Bazil

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #24 on: November 28, 2009, 09:40:03 pm »

See that presents more than one problem.  I'll have to have land without the restrictions or go into it with the expectation that I'm going to build anyway and say to hell wih the restrictions (because it's my property and I can do what I want with it)

And that is one of the point of the FSP.  There isn't any state in the union that allows you to do anything you want with your land right now.
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #25 on: November 28, 2009, 10:01:06 pm »

Yes and that is my personal motivation for wanting to be involved with FSP.  Though everyone involved is working for the same goal overall, people have personal goals they want to resolve, such as ending the drug war, gun rights etc.  For me, it’s the ability to use my land how I want, so there’s a likelihood that a realm of CD in which I might be involved in NH is building a cabin and having animals and gardens on acreage even if a county code or restriction says I can’t. 

There aren’t really a lot of codes in the rural county where my land is in KY, and what few there are, are rarely ever enforced.  But it’s only a matter of time, maybe 10-15 years before that changes, and I’d be standing alone  when I disregard the rules, and continue using my land how I see fit.  At least in NH, I’ll have other people around me supporting property rights. 

In my current location, if I up any kind of resistance or CD to the county officials, I’m just going to be dragged off to jail.  And the neighbors and other residents around me  who are statists, are just going to think I’m crazy, and the ones who might secretly agree with me are just going to stand there and look on as I’m being carted off to jail.
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time4liberty

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2009, 02:04:06 am »

Yes and that is my personal motivation for wanting to be involved with FSP.  Though everyone involved is working for the same goal overall, people have personal goals they want to resolve, such as ending the drug war, gun rights etc.  For me, it’s the ability to use my land how I want, so there’s a likelihood that a realm of CD in which I might be involved in NH is building a cabin and having animals and gardens on acreage even if a county code or restriction says I can’t. 

There aren’t really a lot of codes in the rural county where my land is in KY, and what few there are, are rarely ever enforced.  But it’s only a matter of time, maybe 10-15 years before that changes, and I’d be standing alone  when I disregard the rules, and continue using my land how I see fit.  At least in NH, I’ll have other people around me supporting property rights. 

In my current location, if I up any kind of resistance or CD to the county officials, I’m just going to be dragged off to jail.  And the neighbors and other residents around me  who are statists, are just going to think I’m crazy, and the ones who might secretly agree with me are just going to stand there and look on as I’m being carted off to jail.

That's a major motivation for me too, more than gun rights or the drug war. The other big one is taxes, but that's even tougher to tackle.
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JasonPSorens

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2009, 04:03:44 pm »

If you want lots of land for forestry or hunting but don't want to pay for a buildable lot, one idea is to buy the land and your house separately, but within a short distance of each other.
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kyfornow

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2009, 04:22:55 am »

I can find a HUGE list of properties in Maine that are more than reasonably priced, and quite a few in Vermont, but when the parameters are limited to NH, the search turns up almost nothing fitting what we want.  This is unbelieveable.  Found one in Maine 200 acres for 49,900! 
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time4liberty

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Re: The bottomline for my father
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2009, 01:03:29 pm »

I can find a HUGE list of properties in Maine that are more than reasonably priced, and quite a few in Vermont, but when the parameters are limited to NH, the search turns up almost nothing fitting what we want.  This is unbelieveable.  Found one in Maine 200 acres for 49,900! 

What exactly are you looking for? Do you want to build on it, or just have it for hunting/recreation?

Here's 50 acres for 50,000, in cheshire county, which is a high demand area. If you were to go to coos or something I'm sure you could get much larger tracts for cheaper.

http://www.landwatch.com/Cheshire-County-New-Hampshire-Land-for-sale/pid/114686288
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