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Author Topic: Homeschooling in NH  (Read 9180 times)

creaganlios

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #30 on: November 26, 2009, 09:31:15 am »

New Hampshire awaits your arrival :-)    ;D
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CurtHowland

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #31 on: November 26, 2009, 09:24:22 pm »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

Have you visited your local YMCA recently?

If there is no community theater, start one. Or throw a block party and have the kids do a play. Pyramis and Thisbe from Shakespeare comes to mind.

My last acting part was in a medieval morality play put on at a Society for Creative Anachronism event.

"Arts" are where you find them. So find them.
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creaganlios

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #32 on: November 27, 2009, 07:55:26 am »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

Having home educated 5 of my 6 children, let me give you specifics of how we did this locally (Cheshire County).  And let me preface this by saying there were *so many* opportunities we had to *limit* them...and at least one of our friends' chidlren remarked once, "We don't Homeschool - We Car School!" because of all the opportunities.

SPORTS :  There are community-base soccer and baseball (Cal Ripken League) teams in every town; Keene Rec Center; YMCA; Several martial arts dojos; Presidential Fitness Exam administered by LAMP (area homeschool group); Camp Takodah; Camp Spofford Homeschool Week; privately organized hiking groups

ART/CULTURE: Moco (f/k/a/ "The Moving Company) has art, dance, plays, & musicals - this organization ALONE can overwhelm you with The Arts;The Colonial Theater cultural events; Sagendorph gallery at Keene State College; trips to every cultural venue you can imagine (worcester medieval armor castle being my favorite); lessons offered privately by many home ed parents.

My home educated kids had more opportunities than *I* did when I was in public school, because we didin't have to stick to the school calendar!
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CurtHowland

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #33 on: November 27, 2009, 09:04:13 am »

My home educated kids had more opportunities than *I* did when I was in public school, because we didin't have to stick to the school calendar!

When I read this, I let out a whoop, my wife just looked at me like I was crazy.  ;D
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adirondeau

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #34 on: November 27, 2009, 09:52:54 am »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

I dunno 'bout all you, but when I was growing up there were plenty of sports and activities going on right in my own neighborhood, and that didn't require a penny of government spending to fund: football, baseball, basketball, kickball, ice-skating, hockey, skiing, snowboarding, etc. I assure you no school ever organized some groups of kids to go hunting with their fathers. There was a family whose kids would put on plays in their backyard. And those big bulky VHS cameras had just come out, so there were at least 3 "movies" made at some point. Social activities also existed, but I suppose to a lesser extent than recreational activities. ... I bet with the power of the Internets, it's easier for homeschooling families to stay connected with others and informed about goings on.

Government will never ever need to fund sports, the arts, or social activities. As long as human beings exist, they will very likely value--and pay--for each of them.
[/quote]

There are some town sports around here, not too many and not very organized. I want my kids to have the discipline in organized sports. Playing a pick up game is great and I encourage that also, but the feeling of playing on an organized team. In NY home school kids can play on their local school's sports team because we already pay school taxes. Are there home school co-ops in NH?

I do see your points, my brother my cousin and I did all sorts of organized and unorganized athletics during the summer, but they were not the same as the school sports.
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time4liberty

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #35 on: November 27, 2009, 01:24:29 pm »

regardless of public school, homeschooling puts kids in an uncompetitive environment.

Lol, yeah, I guess that's why homeschoolers average 10-20% above the median in the SAT and ACT, and probably why higher percentages attend and graduate college ;).

I'll tell my friend with the full four year ride to Harvard that if she had just attended public school, she could have a competitive attitude -- and I suppose there's no point in me trying to finish my masters thesis in physics now that I am aware of the crippling uncompetitive environment I was subjected to. =p

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

There are city leagues for many sports, and high school teams, last I heard, still take home school students. I was on the high school cross country team. Our homeschool group had a drama club, which put on a number of productions. I had the opportunity to play Henry VIII, Mr. Bumble (oliver twist), Elwood P. Dowd (Harvey), and other parts.

Up in Wolfeboro, a homeschooling friend of the family started Perform It! http://www.performitstagecompany.org/, a superb group, with amazing production quality. I've seen a number of Shakespeare productions, some professional, and Perform It's Romeo and Juliet was the best, bar none. Here's an interview about the group: http://www.homeeducator.com/FamilyTimes/articles/10-3article6.htm.

There were plenty of other social activities as well. There were occasional group field trips. We had a co-op every Monday in the spring, where homeschool students could come and take classes by area parents in their areas of expertise. There was chess, auto-mechanics, sign language, improv, etc. In the winter, we moved monday's work to saturday, and the whole group went skiing.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2009, 01:49:53 pm by ttie »
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creaganlios

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #36 on: November 27, 2009, 02:06:09 pm »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

Not to kick a dead horse, but shouldn't you really have asked, "If you're in public school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?"

I went to public school through 12th grade.  Sports?  I never played a single sport, and ducked out in gym class into solo activities ("cross-country," which meant run to the back of the school and hang out) because I couldnt play any team sports and they never taught me).  But once I became a homeschooling dad, I ended up coaching youth soccer for 5 year-olds, and running the Presidential Fitness Contest for our homeschool group!

Plays? i was never in a play.   

Social Activities?  As a studious child, I was on the outs with all the sub-groups, and never went to school-based social activities.  I found political groups - OUTSIDE of school - when I was 16, and that became my social network.

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kyfornow

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #37 on: November 27, 2009, 09:14:45 pm »

Where I am located, sports are the top priority for the public schools here, and they are primarily football, basketball and baseball- in that order.

I was in the marching band and I didn't even fit in that social scene.  I was too busy being contradictory and disobedient toward the powers that be to be popular or cool, besides I'm to much of a nerd to be cool anyway!

I can tell you that most of the homeschooling in this region is done very inefficiently and poorly.  I have yet to meet a homeschooled person here who isn't academically deficient, and who can hold a conversation.  

And I mean, we're using ME as a reference point for social skills here.  I'm very much not the poster child for the social skills of the year award, and the homeschoolers I have met make me look like I am the epitome of charm and sociability.
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sj

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #38 on: November 28, 2009, 12:22:26 pm »

In answer to the question about what home schoolers do about extra curricular activities like sports, most public schools allow home and privately educated students to be involved in sports.  When I was home schooled, it was often not allowed, but around my junior year in high school, public schools started being a little bit more accepting.

Regarding the comment that public schools are more "competitive," it seems to me that classroom education tends to favor the lowest common denominator rather than pulling other students up to the highest achiever.  Without all this public school "competition," it's amazing how the majority of home schooled students graduate early, get accepted into top colleges and perform at the top of their classes (I started college at 16 and graduated summa cum laude before moving on to a top-tier law school, and I'm an underachiever compared to many of my childhood friends).
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CurtHowland

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2009, 01:47:08 pm »

Where I am located, sports are the top priority for the public schools here, and they are primarily football, basketball and baseball- in that order.

That's really too bad. Highschool football has a terrible rate of injury. Subjecting growing knees to that kind of stress, it's psychotic.

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I was in the marching band...

I cannot think of highschool band without instantly flashing over to _American Pie_: "And at Band Camp, the first time I put my flute up..."

Quote
and I didn't even fit in that social scene.

So what you're saying is, public school didn't work for you but homeschooling doesn't work for anyone else.

You'll forgive me for just not seeing how that is anything but a non-sequiter.

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I can tell you that most of the homeschooling in this region is done very inefficiently and poorly.

You've interviewed most of the homeschoolers in an entire region?

In contrast, I can give you direct citations about how poorly and inefficiently public school is done, everywhere.

Some get out alive. Some don't.

Here's the trick: Once a young person can read, it's all about letting them find what they're interested in. Getting to the point in any subject where they can start taking college classes is not hard.
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kyfornow

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #40 on: December 01, 2009, 02:02:46 am »




So what you're saying is, public school didn't work for you but homeschooling doesn't work for anyone else.
You'll forgive me for just not seeing how that is anything but a non-sequiter.

No, if you'll look through this thread, what I said was that homeschooling is actually the best and most effective approach for educating youth, IF it is done correctly.


Quote
You've interviewed most of the homeschoolers in an entire region?
 

No, but I have met quite a few because I did research on the subject formally. This also means I utilized a great deal of data connected to home schooling in this particular reason, to indicate that it had a trend leaning toward poor implementation.


Quote
In contrast, I can give you direct citations about how poorly and inefficiently public school is done, everywhere.

I can also give direct citations on how poor and inefficient the public schools are.  I don't know how you would have gotten that I was a fan of them.  :)


Quote
Here's the trick: Once a young person can read, it's all about letting them find what they're interested in. Getting to the point in any subject where they can start taking college classes is not hard.

If you look back, I expressed this as well.  As far as I am concerned the most successful measure of educating youth is when they are able to be self-starting.  Once they get to the point where they only need you for occasional guidance or advice, then you have done your job as a teacher.
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adirondeau

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2009, 07:11:50 pm »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

Have you visited your local YMCA recently?

If there is no community theater, start one. Or throw a block party and have the kids do a play. Pyramis and Thisbe from Shakespeare comes to mind.

My last acting part was in a medieval morality play put on at a Society for Creative Anachronism event.

"Arts" are where you find them. So find them.

The local YMCA is 28 miles away.
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adirondeau

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Re: Homeschooling in NH
« Reply #42 on: December 01, 2009, 07:13:34 pm »

If you home school what do you do about sports, plays, and other social activities?

Having home educated 5 of my 6 children, let me give you specifics of how we did this locally (Cheshire County).  And let me preface this by saying there were *so many* opportunities we had to *limit* them...and at least one of our friends' chidlren remarked once, "We don't Homeschool - We Car School!" because of all the opportunities.

SPORTS :  There are community-base soccer and baseball (Cal Ripken League) teams in every town; Keene Rec Center; YMCA; Several martial arts dojos; Presidential Fitness Exam administered by LAMP (area homeschool group); Camp Takodah; Camp Spofford Homeschool Week; privately organized hiking groups

ART/CULTURE: Moco (f/k/a/ "The Moving Company) has art, dance, plays, & musicals - this organization ALONE can overwhelm you with The Arts;The Colonial Theater cultural events; Sagendorph gallery at Keene State College; trips to every cultural venue you can imagine (worcester medieval armor castle being my favorite); lessons offered privately by many home ed parents.

My home educated kids had more opportunities than *I* did when I was in public school, because we didin't have to stick to the school calendar!

Very useful, thanks!
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