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Author Topic: Snow and snowmobiling  (Read 11216 times)

Aqua Proton

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Snow and snowmobiling
« on: November 01, 2009, 02:38:26 am »

Hi,

I first heard about the FSP on a Lew Rockwell podcast.  So my wife and I started checking out what NH is all about.  Well, the more we looked, the more we like it.  It seems like the perfect place for us and I think we’ll be moving there.  And although there are tons of other things we should be looking into first (like finding a job and where we want to live), I have to ask...how’s the snowmobiling? 

I lived in Alaska for 10 years and some of my favorite memories are the snowmobile trips I used to take.  Because of my occupation I’ll probably need to live near a more populated area (looks like South NH), but I don’t mind driving north for great trails. 

Is a lot of snow a regular thing?  The last couple of years I lived in Alaska the snow conditions were terrible.  It would snow, then melt, then turn to ice.  There’s no skiing or snowmobiling in those conditions.  I’ve come to realize I like colder weather, but not without the snow.  I would be very disappointed to get there and find out the snow season is lame. 

Does NH have a long snow season?   Does the snow there stick around all winter or is it that you get big snow storms and then it all melts?

Kevin
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natf

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2009, 08:43:41 am »

I've been snowmobiling in NH and ME for 25 years.  Generally you can count on a three month long snowmobile season and if it's a good year or you search hard for snow four month is not unheard of.  The trails officially open on the later of December 15th or when there is more than six inches of snow on the ground.  Riding is generally trail based, with local clubs grooming sections of trails that connect throughout New England and further.  In a good winter the trails south of Lake Winnipesaukee will be open and you'll be able to ride on trails that extend as far south as Manchester.  There are local club trails even further south than that.

In general it's more of a question of how far you are willing to drive to find good riding that if there is snow.  However sometimes there is no snow, or poor conditions for an entire winter but that's a rare thing.

-Nat
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sj

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2009, 10:53:21 am »

Have you joined?  http://freestateproject.org/join

Snowmobiling is big in Northern New England.  Many people come from other parts of the country to snowmobile. 
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Dreepa

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2009, 04:04:09 pm »



Does NH have a long snow season?   Does the snow there stick around all winter or is it that you get big snow storms and then it all melts?

Kevin

Welcome...
Last year I didn't see my lawn from Dec - April... the year before it was Nov... it sticks.

There are snowmobiling trails ALL OVER NH.

Come up and visit.
Visit during the Liberty Forum!
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Aqua Proton

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2009, 11:08:20 am »

That's great to hear; thanks for the replies.  Yes, SJ, we just joined last night.  Should my wife sign up too separately?  I'm really glad I heard about the FSP.  It's definitely needed.

As I mentioned before, we'll probably be moving to southern NH.  Do you need studded tires down there?
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2009, 12:38:47 pm »

No, but many people switch out their All Seasons for studded winter snows.
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2009, 01:08:44 pm »

Yes, your wife should sign up separately, eh.  Also, be sure to sign up (separately) at pledgebank.com/Next1000.  The counters are our biggest recruiting tools, and you can help get other future activists excited about moving by signing up there and also updating your address here when you move.

Since my property lies right on the Salisbury Watershed, I have twelve acres of great snowmobiling right in my backyard.  We have lots of folks going by during the winter, and the trails there are pretty well established.  Another benefit to Seabrook is that the roads are kept open year round.  We get about half as much snowfall as the Merrimack Valley, have winter lows about 5-10 degrees warmer (26-31, instead of 21 F at night, for example) than Manchester, and there are a lot more rural-type activities around here.

I personally love Seabrook because of the low taxes, relaxed zoning, being right on the ocean, and because you get easy access to Portsmouth, north shore (Amesbury, Haverill, and Newburyport) and Boston.  Check out the 101 Reasons to move to Seabrook thread.
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Aqua Proton

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2009, 01:51:27 pm »

No, but many people switch out their All Seasons for studded winter snows.

Are the roads usually cleared and salted/sanded quickly after a snow fall?

Yes, your wife should sign up separately, eh.  Also, be sure to sign up (separately) at pledgebank.com/Next1000.

Okay, we'll both sign up for both. 

I personally love Seabrook...

Being so close to the water, is it much more humid than inland?  I'd prefer 10 degrees colder if it's drier.  I don't like cold, "wet" air.
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natf

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2009, 02:41:27 pm »

Are the roads usually cleared and salted/sanded quickly after a snow fall?
It depends greatly on the road and the community.  Interstates are very well maintained, and the vast majority of communities keep their major roads as clear as possible even during a storm.  Tertiary roads tend to vary widely, but typically they are not well maintained during a storm but fairly soon after they are cleared.  I live in the suburbs (1/2 acre lots, etc) and as long as I clear the end of my driveway I can take my car out during the vast majority of storms.  I still prefer to drive our truck in bad weather, but I never bother with studded tires for either vehicle, and rarely bother to use 4wd in the truck.  That said my house is in a fairly level section of town until I get to main roads so there are no major hills on poorly plowed tertiary roads.

Quote
Being so close to the water, is it much more humid than inland?  I'd prefer 10 degrees colder if it's drier.  I don't like cold, "wet" air.

Come visit.  In a weekend you can see all the major regions of New Hampshire and pick where you want to live.  The seacoast is nice, but so is the rest of the state.  Sometimes the coast is more humid, but sometimes the sea breeze makes the coastline much nicer.  All in all I think the seacoast is a great place to live if it fits your lifestyle.

BTW - check out nhsa.com, it's the New Hampshire Snowmobile Association.  In a month and a half or so clubs will begin updating trail conditions.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2009, 04:07:20 pm »

So which is it?
The seacoast is warm with very little snow? Or lots of snow?
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2009, 04:26:50 pm »

No, but many people switch out their All Seasons for studded winter snows.

Are the roads usually cleared and salted/sanded quickly after a snow fall?

Yes, your wife should sign up separately, eh.  Also, be sure to sign up (separately) at pledgebank.com/Next1000.

Okay, we'll both sign up for both. 

I personally love Seabrook...

Being so close to the water, is it much more humid than inland?  I'd prefer 10 degrees colder if it's drier.  I don't like cold, "wet" air.

Okay, thanks a bunch.  We're also looking for volunteers to help out with the Next 1,000, especially for out of state stuff.

As far as the humidity is concerned, it's actually much less humid by the ocean, for various reasons.  We also get less precipitation and the winds are more steady.  When winds are more stagnant inland, we tend to continue getting the breeze from the midatlantic.

I lived in Manch for about four years, and I can tell you that the snowplow service out here is more on top of things than it was in Manch.  Livability on the seacoast is, I think, about the best in the northeast, and the crime here in Seabrook is almost non-existent.  It's also a relative tax haven, and folks around here basically believe that you have a right to do pretty much what you want with your own land.
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Aqua Proton

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2009, 05:02:45 pm »

...have winter lows about 5-10 degrees warmer (26-31, instead of 21 F at night, for example) than Manchester, and there are a lot more rural-type activities around here.

Hmm, I might like Seabrook.  We're looking for something with room.  We'd like to be in a house with 2+ acres (wooded).  I'd rather not see our neighbors' houses.  Not that we're anti-social, quite the contrary, but after living in a place where the houses are on top of one another, it would be nice to have some room.  I also want to garden and have a workshop and such.  I'm going off on a tangent here.

I'd like to know more about the winter in Seabrook.  You mentioned winter lows nearing 31.  What are the winter highs then?  I'm thinking at those temps, the snow you get must be melting over the season.  Remembering my days living in Alaska, I really didn't care for the "wet pack" snow.  The stuff you could make snowmen out of.  I prefer "dry" snow (if that makes sense).  To put it another way, once the snow season hits, the snow doesn't melt until the season is over.

We're also looking for volunteers to help out with the Next 1,000, especially for out of state stuff.

What can I do to help?
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2009, 05:39:03 pm »

For Next 1,000, you can put the pledgebank.com/Next1000 in your signature (on fora and emails) and let friends-family-neighbors-coworkers know about the fsp before you move.  Write a letter to the editor of your local paper and let folks know about this effort.  There will probably be a few hundred people reading that who recognize your name.  It's good to get the word out.

As far as the snow is concerned, I think the actual figures for Jan lows are about 26 (I think) versus 16 for Manchester, IIRC.  We lose that snow about a month before the folks inland do, and I'm usually pretty tired of the stuff by then, myself.  If April comes around and you STILL want to go skiing, snowboarding, etc, the mountains are not too far from here by I-95.

If you want to rent a house (or buy a house) on some land, there are plenty of parcels around here on land or abutting conservation areas.  That's the cool things about Seabrook.  You can buy half an acre and still have access to large sections of land somewhere.  I've got the twelve acre Salisbury Watershed behind my house, and I'm not responsible for eleven acres of that... nor do I pay taxes on that stuff.
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natf

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2009, 07:14:55 pm »

I'd like to know more about the winter in Seabrook.  You mentioned winter lows nearing 31.  What are the winter highs then?  I'm thinking at those temps, the snow you get must be melting over the season.  Remembering my days living in Alaska, I really didn't care for the "wet pack" snow.  The stuff you could make snowmen out of.  I prefer "dry" snow (if that makes sense).  To put it another way, once the snow season hits, the snow doesn't melt until the season is over.

If you really want the cold dry snow you'll have to head fairly far north in NH.  Anywhere along the seacoast or southern tier of the state you'll get as much wet snow as dry, even if it stays rather than melt away.  In Seabrook and the rest of the coastal area it's unusual to have snow cover all winter, although the past few years it has.  It takes a good cold snap to get that dry "squeaky" snow.  I've lived in the Manchester/Nashua metro area for more than 8 years and we've had as many winters with normally bare ground as normally snow covered ground.  The past two years have been unusual with snow cover all winter long in southern NH.

If you want to snowmobile outside your door on a regular, reliable basis you'll have to be north of Concord at least, and better yet north of the Notches.  Generally speaking snowmobiling in NH is divided into three regions, from Lake Winnipesaukee to the southern side of the White Mountains, from the northern (divided by Franconia Notch) side of the White Mountains to about Errol and then the northern half of Coos County.  There's good sledding in all areas, but the further north you go the more reliable snow conditions are and the more "diehard" sledders you tend to meet.

-Nat
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MaineShark

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Re: Snow and snowmobiling
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2009, 08:43:29 pm »

And although there are tons of other things we should be looking into first (like finding a job and where we want to live), I have to ask...how’s the snowmobiling? 

I lived in Alaska for 10 years and some of my favorite memories are the snowmobile trips I used to take.  Because of my occupation I’ll probably need to live near a more populated area (looks like South NH), but I don’t mind driving north for great trails.

I live a bit east of Concord, and we have plenty of snowmobiles around, all winter.  A trail cuts through my back field, and they're out there from the first major snowfall, until the grass starts to show through, in the spring.  There are races on a number of the area lakes, as well.

As far as the humidity is concerned, it's actually much less humid by the ocean, for various reasons.

Having grown up on the seacoast, I can state for a fact that that's completely inaccurate.

The humidity is dramatically higher, and the warmer temperatures turn normal snow into sticky messes.

Moving a few miles inland dramatically helps the situation, even if we still occasionally get wet snow.  I absolutely love the ocean, but I'd rather live a few miles further away, where i can still visit (~45 minute drive), but don't have to clean up that horrible mess every time there's a storm.

Joe
« Last Edit: November 03, 2009, 06:49:12 am by MaineShark »
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