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Author Topic: Curious newcomer  (Read 3374 times)

Mastinox

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Curious newcomer
« on: September 15, 2009, 12:32:48 am »

 First let me say I am excited about this site. Moving to NH would be a pretty big step and I have a couple questions just to get the ball rolling.


How is agriculture or personal gardening in NH. I forsee some very tough economic times in the future and being able to grow food and even hunt would be a very high asset. I ask out of ignorance because I am from the southern part of the country and our growing seasons are long. My first impression about VH is how far north it is and the limited growing season it must have for crops. I lived in Maryland for a couple years but I don't think the winters there are near what NH experiences. Any input on this would be great.

I'm not a survivalist or anything. Just weary of the dollar and our mountain of debt. With our government having their fingers in every single pot, feeding oneself could become an issue. I believe that a well and farmland will one day be a huge asset when the government socialism money machine runs out.
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2009, 01:07:34 am »

Those are good points.  There are a lot of folks growing their own food here in New Hampsha, and they admit that, with shorter growing seasons, they're able to get a bit less out of the ground.  Having lots of trees and conservation areas, it's not Iowa, but it is a good place to grow food.

I recently had a less than successful (though very cheap) experiment in gardening which was intercepted this summer by local squirrels.  However, I'm also planning to plant some fruit trees on my property, then add some rugged vegetable crops when I can clear an area for them.

Just a dacha.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2009, 01:25:18 am »

You do realize that they farm even in Quebec?
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MTPorcupine3

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2009, 06:44:28 am »

There are numerous farms on which you can work and learn, including one run by Porcupines. Check out http://bardoproject.com/ , www.dacres.org , http://www.wwoofusa.org/ , http://www.growfood.org/ . I've worked on three farms in New Hampshire. Here in Grafton we're building a greenhouse and ever expanding our farming, etc. You might want to check us out.

cathleeninnh

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2009, 08:06:11 am »

I am not a farmer. Many of us are trying our best to learn to grow some of our food. The season is short and the soil is rocky. I have been told to keep building the soil with compost and such and in a few years the garden will yield better. We do what we can. I like having a piece of land and a house with a well and septic. My garden isn't what I worry about most. The property tax for a year is about twice what we spend on food. I can stockpile food, but if the jobs dry up I want to keep my home.
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lobstah

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2009, 08:27:50 am »

A lot of people here are really into living independently from the government and they know their stuff. A lot of them hang out at www.nhfree.com too. I think nh I a good place to be when the poop hits the fan.
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FirstClown

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2009, 08:46:33 am »

I've been studying Biointensive farming for the exact reasons you state. When I do move to NH, I plan on getting some land (hopefully) and from what I've learned working on farms and experiments I've done in my own garden, I should be able to feed my whole family on about 1 acre of land. It looks like New Hampshire will have about 2 growing seasons provided that one of them uses mainly cold weather crops (cabbage, broccoli, garlic, onions, spinach). The no-frost time seems to be almost exactly 3 months (I'm seeing 6/9 to 9/9, are you guys frosting already?), but with a lot of the hardiness zones changing upwards, you might get a little more. That means you shouldn't try to grow anything like large amounts of tomatoes, but potatoes, beans and early corn should work fine. You can then plant wheat to overwinter with a nice harvest in the Spring.

If you have a greenhouse, even better and even a couple of cloches to put over the beds will allow you to grow more cold hardy vegetables, like cabbage in the late fall/early spring.

Short answer, it should be totally doable. Check out the book How To Grow More Vegetables, since I think it offers the best method for growing the soil without the need for any outside chemicals or fertilizers. If the economy does fall apart, you won't be able to get outside fertilizers anyway.  And if it doesn't, your eating that much healthier. Win-win, really.
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WendellBerry

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2009, 09:00:03 am »

here in Concord you can even rent a small plot in a community garden...
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Mastinox

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2009, 10:22:31 am »

You do realize that they farm even in Quebec?


hehe, yeah I understand that it isn't like the arctic circle or anything. Just the length of the growing season was my intent.

Thx for the feedback all. I will do some more google searches and get it all sorted out.
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John Edward Mercier

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2009, 01:17:32 pm »

The period of daylight between the vernal equinox and autumnal equinox gets longer the further north you go.
Our growing season is more limited by soil and air temperatures... so we use various means to compensate.
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sj

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2009, 02:22:45 pm »

There are numerous farms on which you can work and learn, including one run by Porcupines. Check out http://bardoproject.com/ , www.dacres.org , http://www.wwoofusa.org/ , http://www.growfood.org/ . I've worked on three farms in New Hampshire. Here in Grafton we're building a greenhouse and ever expanding our farming, etc. You might want to check us out.

Thanks for the links.
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live_freeze_anddie

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Re: Curious newcomer
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2009, 08:11:57 am »

First let me say I am excited about this site. Moving to NH would be a pretty big step and I have a couple questions just to get the ball rolling.


How is agriculture or personal gardening in NH. I forsee some very tough economic times in the future and being able to grow food and even hunt would be a very high asset. I ask out of ignorance because I am from the southern part of the country and our growing seasons are long. My first impression about VH is how far north it is and the limited growing season it must have for crops. I lived in Maryland for a couple years but I don't think the winters there are near what NH experiences. Any input on this would be great.

I'm not a survivalist or anything. Just weary of the dollar and our mountain of debt. With our government having their fingers in every single pot, feeding oneself could become an issue. I believe that a well and farmland will one day be a huge asset when the government socialism money machine runs out.

As a an organic grower, those would be my first questions as well, if i were to move, which i am seriously considering.
Yes, the growing season is very short. We plant early vegetable crops as soon as April, such as peas and lettuce. Planting time for heat lovers is about late May, early June. Soil here tends to be acidic so amendments are necessary. Very rocky. We're gearing up for our first hard freeze, so i need to get those apples off the trees!

Now the really bad news for growers in NH. Due to unprecedented floods for the 2 years previous to this one, and wild fluctuations of climate here, residents are starting to make jokes about summer in NH becoming extinct. It's not quite so funny a joke for farmers.
This growing year was horrendous. Cold, wet June and July...summer really didn't even start until mid August. 6 out of my 9 vegetable crops were destroyed by cool weather and not enough sun. To give you some idea, i was planting in June in a winter coat in the cold rain. The crops that did survive this year are late. Most tomatoes in the entire state were destroyed by "late blight" (the blight that caused the potato famine) for the past 2 years. Growing here has become a laborous nightmare of repeated replanting, rotting seeds from too much moisture, and blighted crops. It's a very sad state here for farmers right now.

As far as being a survivalist, you just might want to look into that if you've never experienced winter. We had a devastating ice storm last year, early December (wasn't even officially winter yet), and a handful of New England states were without power for over a week in sub zero temps. I own a generator and a wood stove. Had the teenager guarding the generator with a gun because people were vandalizing them. Great fun in the north we have. It's been a blast, i tell ya.


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