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Author Topic: Professional Licensing  (Read 9364 times)

Midwest Patriot

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2002, 10:45:33 am »

I would remind you that the free market system we talk about will naturally weed out the incompetents in any profession.   I have practiced as an electrical engineer for thirty years, but refuse to become licensed by the state.   The license means I'm good at taking tests.  Time in the profession and repeat customers means I can claim competency.
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Mogray

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2003, 08:43:47 am »

I think we all know that making the choosen state into "the free state" is a going to be a long process.  We do need to debate and determine what the final goal is.  But we also need to determine the first practical steps.

For instance, if we tried to pass a law right away to do away with all medical licensing it would be too big a step for most people and make it easy for the fear mongers to defeat it.  A first step might be to accept a license from any other state as reason enough to issue a Free State license of the same type.  This would make it much easier for practioners from other states to move to the FS.  This is good for FS people because it increases the supply.  (My wife is a physical therapist and licensing is the biggest issue for us when considering a inter-state move.)

Next, we can look at licensed profressions that aren't quite as scary to consumers.  Would you be willing to get your hair cut by someone who wasn't licensed?   Here in Texas a person without a license who cuts hair (for money) is breaking the law and could be in big trouble.  So, a first step might be to make the license optional.  The person has to post either the license or something saying they are performing hair cutting without, and the consumer decides.  Later, after people are used to it, you remove the posting requirement.

I believe we need to retain our ideals but think in practical terms.

  -- Mogray
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BobW

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2003, 09:06:19 am »

Hi all,

Here's a tangent view.  True, licenses are revenue generators.  Delve beyond this and we can see cartels within the various professional societies in the US.

Recall the Allan Bakke (spell?) case in California.  He sought a medical school slot but got caught up in the quota system. Recall the "rescue" of the American medical school students at a med school in Grenada.  With the overcapacity in higher education schools- if you accept this-why weren't many more med schools established over the years.  

CPAs, attorneys, the tenured professors, and other professions, are running cartels.  So I don't have everyone here hating me, so too, are the blue collar trades.  The maritime industry, for all practical purposes, left the US - although still US owned.

Now, look at the high-tech industries.  Was there a valid reason Loral and Rayethon were running space shots in China?  American engineers are not competitive against foreign engineers in the micro picture.  It's the cartel elements helping to cause this.  

Other examples of the modern cartel can be seen in the public school teacher unions with their difficult to obtain requirements for entry, etc.

BobW
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vermass

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2003, 11:17:50 am »

  I am an LPN not an RN. In my work environment (ie: a nursing home) I can do ALMOST everything an RN can do. The limits I have are those that the RN lobby has pushed for in Standards Of Practice. Because the is a certain pay scale for RN's and one for LPN's my competency as a nurse is important but not the deciding factor for my pay. My license is the deciding factor, I am limited by my title instead of my abilities. That is a major downfall of the licensing system. Everyone says I should go back to school to GET my RN, not because I need to learn more. My unit is the smoothest run in the home I work in and we are ALL LPN's!
   
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kekaha

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2003, 10:06:23 am »

Licensing by any government means that they want money and control of you first and foremost. I have met and used many licensed individuals and I was not impressed with many of them. However, I have used unlicensed people and with good results. Qualified people are qualified reguardless of license. Maybe what we can setup is a "Reference Posting" similar to what they have on ebay and you can see comments from all who use or order from someone. It will show all comments left by people who are happy with or unhappy with services they received from the in question Service Provider. If you are finilar with ebay and their rating of sellers and buyers it would help you know who to use and not to use.
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Aaron

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Re:Professional Licensing
« Reply #20 on: May 13, 2003, 02:41:19 am »

I am currently a massage therapist student in Southern California.  California is one of the few states in the union that does not have statewide licensing requirements in my soon to be profession.  As a result, licensing regulations have sprung up on a city by city basis.  The State legislature is debating a bill right now that would change this; fortunately it is tied up in committee right now.  

What was interesting to learn is that there is really only one reason why California's cities enacted these requirements in the first place.  None of them have anything to do ensuring client safety or practicioner competence; their only purpose is to dissuade prostitutes from disguising their true profession in their advertisements.  The reasoning is if you require 1000 hours of training for a license, no prostitute would bother.  Not only does this inane logic ignore the obvious solution of legalizing prostitution which would allow them to dispense with the doublespeak in their ads, but it didn't even work!  The '70s and '80s saw the massage school industry flourish as term after term, their classes were overenrolled with, you guessed it, prostitutes!  Sex is a lucrative business.  They can easily afford tuition better than we apiring serious practicioners.  

Not only that, it nearly killed a huge chunk of Cali's tourism industry.  The resorts and spas couldn't find licensed therapists to hire!  Here in the Coachella Valley this trend was reversed when Marriot built their Desert Springs Resort in Palm Desert.  When they couldn't keep their spa staffed properly, they vigorously lobbied the city to reduce the requirements.  Most of the other cities in the valley soon followed suit not wanting to lose business to Palm Desert.

The bottom line is most therapists are not in business for themselves.  They work for day spas or resorts.  These businesses have a vested interest in maintaining high standards of safety and competence since the competition is so fierce.  Word spreads like wildfire around here about customer complaints.  I can say for sure that in this industry, licensing is completely unnecessary.  The clients don't need it.  The practitioners and their employers don't need it.  The only one who needs it is the city governments because it is nothing more than a revenue generating device.

By the way, I never really grasped how truly draconian most zoning regulations are until I heard the story of the crap my school had to go through just to move to a bigger building in Palm Springs.  Our business manager had the full support of the planning commission.  The vote was about to go through when at the last minute some a-hole council member says, "Wait a minute.  Now you guys seem like you are on the up and up and all; but if we give you in kind C-2 status for your school, pretty soon every C-2 parcel in Palm Springs is going to have a brothel masquerading as a school pop up on it."  The application was denied.  Without the help of a friend on the planning commission in securing a special exemption, we would still be sharing a run down building with a cosmetology school in Desert Hot Springs (the wrong end of the valley for those of you unfamiliar with the area).

City Councilman Joe is right when he says local politics are full of opportunities to apply libertarian principles.
 
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