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Author Topic: NV to NH  (Read 13200 times)

MaineShark

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Re: NV to NH
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2008, 09:54:13 pm »

I'm sure it is drastically different (ton=ounce?), but anything in such large quanitities is radioactive, unless refined, and coal would be terribly expensive if it was.

The ratio is far more skewed than a ton to an ounce.  And coal is a particularly-radioactive mineral.

Forgot to mention that if such is the case, then the earth itself is a source of radiation.

The earth is a source of radiation.  The question is amount.  Coal releases an awful lot when burned.

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Yeah, it takes several inches of concrete to shield gamma radiation.  Or several millimeters of lead.
Well, it depends on intensity, but gamma rad is very dangerous. One pound of waste will produce more than that I'm sure.

The amount of waste is irrelevant.  Whether there is one gamma ray per second, or ten, or a thousand (or whatever) hitting the shielding, the penetration depth does not change.

Not sure I understand the delivered price vs undelivered price, shipping shouldn't be more than $200.

Lots of places advertise low prices, then charge very high "handling" and "freight" charges which are totally unrealistic, in order to make up the difference.

And I've no way of knowing exact production under typical circumstances. Is 75% a good figure?

Um, no.  Look up a "sun hours per day" chart, for starters.  Those panels only produce power when the sun is on them, at reasonable strength.  Call it 10% for the winter and maybe 20-25% during the summer.

Again, no way to compensate for those unknowns, I'm neither a geologist nor engineer in anything.

Those aren't unknowns.  You can get numbers for the various pieces of equipment, and pretty-accurate estimates from PV sizing guides for things like battery discharge percentage and such.

For a 24kwh per day system with two days of capacity, and a 24VDC battery bank which is discharged to 50%, you'd need 5520 amp-hours of battery capacity.  You'd need 560 amps of PV panels to charge during the winter.  The ones you linked are 7.61amp modules, so you would need 74 of them.  If you just wanted to be able to charge under average conditions (meaning you might need to use a generator to charge during a stormy winter), you'd need 320 amps, so you could get by with 42 panels.  And that's assuming the voltage numbers they give are accurate - if not, you'd need to double the number of panels.

Joe
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Ron Helwig

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Re: NV to NH
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2008, 07:30:35 am »

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What is "all electric" supposed to mean, exactly?  Most houses around here use 10-20kwh per day, and that is not "all-electric."

I happen to have my latest electric bill handy. It says the daily average for Little Minnesota is 43KWH for the last month (average temp being 56 degrees F). We have propane heat and stove. The dryer is propane as well. The oven is electric, but we only use that 2-3 times/week.

Admittedly we have more people than the average house, and more computers as well. The 10-20kwh figure is probably a decent estimate for most folks.
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NJLiberty

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Re: NV to NH
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2008, 08:41:45 am »

We have three adults and one child here in NJ, propane heat/hot water/stove, supplemented with electric space heaters from November to March. I just looked at my electric bill and we average about 25 KWH here. We would probably be in the 10-20 range if I could get them to remember to turn off the lights, etc, when they aren't in the room.

George
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NJLiberty

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Re: NV to NH
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2008, 09:09:28 am »


The ratio is far more skewed than a ton to an ounce.  And coal is a particularly-radioactive mineral.

Joe

According to a number of websites, the ratio is about 120,000:1 between coal and nuclear under optimal conditions for coal. If the conditions aren't optimal for the coal fired plant then it can go to as much as 350,000:1.

There is an interesting article here http://www.ornl.gov/info/ornlreview/rev26-34/text/colmain.html about the nuclear products in the emissions of coal fired plants.

George
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techforumz

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Re: NV to NH
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2008, 01:29:04 pm »

Quote
What is "all electric" supposed to mean, exactly?  Most houses around here use 10-20kwh per day, and that is not "all-electric."

I happen to have my latest electric bill handy. It says the daily average for Little Minnesota is 43KWH for the last month (average temp being 56 degrees F). We have propane heat and stove. The dryer is propane as well. The oven is electric, but we only use that 2-3 times/week.

Admittedly we have more people than the average house, and more computers as well. The 10-20kwh figure is probably a decent estimate for most folks.

That still comes out to 1.8kWh. Which is not terribly off.
The 10/20 estimate comes to 420Wh and 840Wh, respectively.
I got my info here:
http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2003/BoiLu.shtml
Average wattage for a PC is 250Wh. Most PCs have maximum usage at around 500Wh.
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