Free State Project Forum

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down

Author Topic: drug legalization  (Read 5839 times)

J’raxis 270145

  • First 1000
  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1955
  • DILIGE·QVOD·VIS·FAC
    • Jeremy J. Olson
Re: drug legalization
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2008, 02:28:58 am »

Does this movement support total drug legalization?

Decriminalization. Legalization makes believe that it has always been a crime to self-medicate. The truth is that only relatively recently have people somehow rationalized that it was moral to kidnap a human being and lock them in a cage for having the audacity to grow a plant in their own backyard.

It does? Legalization simply means that we’re making something legal that is currently illegal, regardless of historical status. Since practically everything has been legal at some point in time, your definition of legalization makes the word literally useless: nothing can ever be legalized.

And decriminalization actually doesn’t go far enough—what this term means is to downgrade the act from a crime (felony or misdemeanor) to a violation (akin to a traffic ticket). Decriminalization is often the first step to legalization, though.

I don't want to disagree too strenuously about an issue that we appear to be on the same side about. However, in the war of euphemisms I think legalization gives entirely too much power to the state. I wouldn't want a law on the books which specifically says that I can buy, use or distribute x because that changes a right into a privilege.  If there is a law that I can, then apparently I needed their permission and they have just as much right to make the action a crime.

I don't believe that is the case. All rights not specifically granted to the feds are reserved to the state and all rights not specifically granted to the state are reserved to the people. I don't want or need permission. What I want is for there to be no legal penalties for doing some thing that I have a perfect right to do.

Yes, I have a right to smoke crack. I have a right to do absolutely anything that doesn't infringe upon anyone else's right to life, liberty or property. I have a right to open a casino in my house. Any victimless crime legislation is a violation of rights and makes the government the aggressor.

Nothing should ever need to be "legalized". Just de-fund the slave traders.

Legalization wouldn’t involve putting new laws on the books allowing you to buy, use, or distribute x. It would involve repealing the law that currently exists that says you can’t. Incremental legalization, such as making x available via prescription at first, or requiring a tax to be placed on it à la alcohol and tobacco, would involve enacting new laws, but complete legalization would only involve repealing them.

In the case of New Hampshire, the law in question is RSA 318-B, and the clauses that would have to be repealed are mostly under 318-B:2 and 318-B:26.
Logged

Keyser Soce

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1256
Re: drug legalization
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2008, 06:27:11 pm »

Where are you Wally? Does that answer your question? Was that just a little tooo much freedom? With freedom comes responsibility and many people just don't want to be burdened like that. I once knew a guy who said he wished they would outlaw cigarettes so he could quit smoking. Sad but true. 
Logged
"In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man; brave, hated, and scorned. When his cause succeeds however, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." -- Mark Twain

dalebert

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1761
    • Flaming Freedom
Re: drug legalization
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2008, 02:09:54 pm »

Speaking of prohibition, Happy St. Patrick's Day! Don't forget to look for the Easter egg by moving your pointer over the image.

http://anarchyinyourhead.com/2008/03/08/four-leaf-clover/

Keyser Soce

  • FSP Participant
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1256
Re: drug legalization
« Reply #18 on: March 14, 2008, 04:58:28 pm »

Where are you Wally? Does that answer your question? Was that just a little tooo much freedom? With freedom comes responsibility and many people just don't want to be burdened like that. I once knew a guy who said he wished they would outlaw cigarettes so he could quit smoking. Sad but true. 

Apparently Spitzer wanted to outlaw prostitution so he could quit screwing whores. Obviously, prohibition doesn't work.
Logged
"In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man; brave, hated, and scorned. When his cause succeeds however, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot." -- Mark Twain
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up