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Author Topic: Marijuana Laws In NH  (Read 24348 times)

LibertyforLife

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #60 on: February 11, 2007, 09:34:29 pm »

I live in Alaska. As first hand information, it is legal to smoke cronic in your own home, per the State's right to privacy. And you are allow to have no more then 4 oz on your person. However smoking a blunt in public is not legal, nor is driving under the influence. Cops can be kelw if you are kelw to them here. I was pulled over the other day for having a broken tail light, State rules and regulations require that no white light be shown from any stop lamp, and he asked for my insurence but didn't have it in the vehicle I was driving, in violation of State rules, and he just told me to get it covered with some red tape.

Live free or die!
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Ward Griffiths

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Re: Penn and Teller
« Reply #61 on: February 12, 2007, 11:56:24 am »

I just started watching Penn and Teller's show "Bullshit" on DVD.  The series is great, dispelling myths and exposing con artists.  The episode on the War On Drugs is awesome.  It certainly got me fired up on this issue, and I don't have anything personal to gain from it as I don't partake.  I highly recommend we make our friends, neighbors, and lawmakers watch that episode.
Making them watch it would involve Initiation of Force, which is a Bad Thing.  However, if they happen to be visiting your place for a party or something, you might as well put the episode on the tube.  Just don't bar the door.  (You might want to get them warmed up with the Sex episode).
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dareme03244

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #62 on: March 08, 2007, 10:32:41 pm »

There is a really good article written in the Union Leader by Carl Hedberg Monday, Mar. 5, 2007 "Legalizing Marijuana Would Save Lives and Money"  which basically explains how ineffective the marijuana law is.   The absurdity of this law is based on false data reported in the 1930s.  Hopefully, the more the true word about how great a plant cannabis is, people will stand together to make changes happen.
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Ward Griffiths

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #63 on: March 09, 2007, 12:17:13 pm »

There is a really good article written in the Union Leader by Carl Hedberg Monday, Mar. 5, 2007 "Legalizing Marijuana Would Save Lives and Money"  which basically explains how ineffective the marijuana law is.   The absurdity of this law is based on false data reported in the 1930s.  Hopefully, the more the true word about how great a plant cannabis is, people will stand together to make changes happen.

Always a good idea to provide a link to the article.  Especially since the Union Leader on-line site is such a pain in the narfax to navigate.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2007, 12:19:01 pm by Ward Griffiths »
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Gabriel

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #64 on: March 09, 2007, 07:55:05 pm »

Just from a standpoint of word-choice effectiveness, I think the phrase "repeal marijuana prohibition" evokes a better response with many people than does the phrase "legalize marijuana".
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Rocketman

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #65 on: March 09, 2007, 08:25:54 pm »

Yes Gabriel, that and "Ending the War on Marijuana."

Here's an update on the NH decrim bill.  Medical MJ will be considered Monday, and the hemp bill was well-received at its initial hearing last week.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Matt Simon
NH Coalition for Common Sense Marijuana Policy
(603) 391-7450
info@nhcommonsense.org
www.NHCommonSense.org

Minds Change as Decrim Effort Charts New Course

Concord, NH (March 8) --  It was widely believed that House Bill 92, the bill to decriminalize marijuana in NH, would gain little support in the Criminal Justice Committee.  Sponsored by Reps. Charles Weed (D-Keene), Paul Ingbretson (R-Haverhill), and Steve Vallaincourt (R-Manchester), the bill just went too far and changed too much. 

A Criminal Justice subcommittee voted the bill “Inexpedient to Legislate” in a 4-1 vote today, but supporters of moderate reform were pleased to see all five subcommittee members voice their support.  All five openly agreed that possession of marijuana in small amounts should be reduced from a criminal offense to a civil violation, but expressed dissatisfaction with the bill’s authorship.  During the bill’s initial hearing before the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee Jan. 17, bill sponsors encouraged representatives on the committee to craft amendments that would improve the bill, which as written places no limits on acceptable amounts for possession.  This process could have turned HB 92 into a workable reform similar to laws in other states, but legislators felt the original bill text was too problematic.

The bill as written essentially took marijuana out of the criminal code.  Rep. John Tholl (R-Dalton), subcommittee chair, opened the session by saying he supported the idea of reducing penalties, but was reluctant to get involved with amending HB 92.  “Because of the way the bill came to us, I am not inclined to amend the bill,” he explained.

Two subcommittee members disagreed with Tholl.  Rep. Jeff Fontas (D-Nashua) and Rep. Delmar Burridge (D-Keene) argued in favor of amending the bill and passing it.  This was expected from Fontas, but perhaps not from Burridge, the freshman representative who has been raked across the coals in major media and online forums for urging an HB 92-supporting constituent to snitch on his “so-called friends” (and CC’ing two Keene police officers with his email to the constituent).  Burridge appears to have made a total and sincere conversion on the issue after listening to testimony from Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (L.E.A.P.) and hearing from his constituents.

Rep. David Welch (R-Kingston), a former chair of the Criminal Justice committee, sat in on the session and shared his thoughts.  Like the others, he expressed support for incremental reform, and disdain for the wording of HB92.  “A bill has got to come in the way you want it,” he explained.  Welch told committee members the bill had been “poisoned,” and that the issue “needs to come back to us in a completely different way.”

Representatives Gene Charron (R-Rollinsford) and Roger Berube (D-Somersworth) saluted the public supporters for their sincere efforts, but joined Tholl in a 3-2 vote against retaining the bill for further consideration, with Fontas and Burridge opposed.  After further discussion, representatives appeared to reach a consensus that a new bill would be necessary.  Burridge then joined the majority in the vote to ITL, with Fontas opposed.

“I’m glad to see all six of these committee members agree there’s no good reason to put people through the system for simple possession,” observed Matt Simon, a spokesman for NH Common Sense.  “I believe they all understand the reform we’re proposing makes sense for New Hampshire; now all we need is a well-worded bill.”

Several representatives were insistent that the matter should be properly considered sooner than later.  Under current New Hampshire law, possession of even a trace amount of marijuana is treated as a criminal offense; the “perpetrator” can face up to one year in prison and up to a $2000 fine.  In Maine, by contrast, possession of less than 1.25 ounces is a “civil violation” punishable only by a fine.  12 states have partially decriminalized marijuana since 1973.

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greap

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #66 on: March 10, 2007, 08:24:05 am »

A bit random, but I think relevant to the discussion, it looks very much like all drugs are about to be decriminalised in the UK with the majority of the UK public in support. With the avilability of verifyable metrics on what this does to crime and health, along with the "special relationship" between the UK & US, I think this could be very useful to help illustrate that drug use really isnt that much of a big deal.



Drug laws 'need major overhaul'

Current drug campaigns are failing, the report says Drug laws in Britain have been criticised as being "not fit for purpose" in a major report.

An investigation by the RSA says illicit substances can be "harmless", while drinking and smoking can cause as many problems.

It says the law has been "driven by moral panic", and suggests policy-making should be left to drug teams and local authorities.

The Home Office says it does not accept all of the report's recommendations.

Level of crime

Anthony King, professor of government at Essex University, who chaired the Commission on Illegal Drugs, said the "great majority" of drug users did not harm themselves or others.

"Current policy is broke and needs to be fixed," he added.

The RSA's panel recommends scrapping the Misuse of Drugs Act and replacing it with a broader Misuse of Substances Act, and replacing the existing ABC classification system with an "index of harms".
   
Panel members included Deputy Assistant Commissioner John Yates of the Metropolitan Police.

This would extend the definition of drugs to include alcohol and tobacco - as well as illegal substances, which the report says have been "demonised".

The report, entitled Illegal Drugs, Communities and Public Policy, also calls for so-called "shooting galleries" to be introduced where users can inject drugs as well as wider access to prescription heroin.

It says policy should be about reducing harm and pursuing the criminal gangs behind the drugs trade rather than the level of crime.

If drug taking does not harm anyone, then criminal sanctions should not be applied, the report continues.

'Harmless use'

The report says: "The evidence suggests that a majority of people who use drugs are able to use them without harming themselves or others.

"The harmless use of illegal drugs is thus possible, indeed common."

It says drugs education is "inconsistent, irrelevant, disorganised", and its main focus should shift from secondary to primary schools.
   
The Home Office has estimated that the social cost of drug abuse alone to Britain is between £10bn and £17bn a year.

It said its strategy has led to a 16% fall in drugs crime and more people able to access treatment.

Martin Barnes from the charity Drugscope said drug use needed to be addressed as a wider social problem.

He added: "There's really far too great an emphasis on it being a problem solely associated with crime.

"It's about public health, it's about poor mental health, it's about homelessness."

'Worryingly complacent'

Former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith said the report was "worryingly complacent".

He added: "The RSA has also failed to do its homework by not surveying the views of drug addicts - who want recovery and drug-free lives - not managed dependency on methadone."

Former home secretary David Blunkett told BBC Radio 4's Today programme he wanted to see "a much more sensible debate" and that he supported a "substantial" expansion of the prescribing of heroin.

But Professor Griffith Edwards, emeritus professor of addiction behaviour at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, told BBC Radio Five Live that he was sceptical about the report.

He said: "I doubt whether any swingeing remedies would get one very far."

However, Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Nick Clegg called the report "an extremely important contribution" to the debate, adding: "The so-called war on drugs is failing."

And Steve Rolles of drug law reform campaign group Transform praised the Commission's findings.

"This really is a rational response to 30 years of dramatic failure," he said.
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dareme03244

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #67 on: March 10, 2007, 05:25:51 pm »

I'm not certain how to show a link to a website. 
http://www.unionleader.com/article.aspx?headline=Legalizing+marijuana+would+save+lives+and+money&articleId=024223d5-9226-4ec0-b32d-dffff83c2a7d   
This should bring you directly to the website, if not I apologize.
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dareme03244

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #68 on: March 26, 2007, 04:33:52 pm »

 So, has there been any interest out there for someone to rewrite the HB92?  Sounds like it just needs a little editing for it to get the votes. 
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Rocketman

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #69 on: March 26, 2007, 05:41:42 pm »

HB 92 has been punted.  We hope to file a new bill in December.  Medical marijuana and industrial hemp bills will be considered tomorrow by the full NH house.
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jdorsett

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #70 on: March 26, 2007, 07:33:43 pm »

I and my husband intend on moving as soon as we can.  What can we do from here in Georgia to help this cause?   
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Rocketman

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Re: Marijuana Laws In NH
« Reply #71 on: March 26, 2007, 10:23:03 pm »

I and my husband intend on moving as soon as we can. What can we do from here in Georgia to help this cause?

jdorsett,

Check out NHCommonSense.org in a few weeks.  There will be a big announcement about our next project.  Appreciate your interest.
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