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Author Topic: Drop by in Wyoming.  (Read 5401 times)

eoffshore

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Drop by in Wyoming.
« on: January 07, 2003, 03:22:18 pm »

For those of you traveling through WY, get in touch. I may be able to arrange for a place to stay...especially for those of you bringing rifles (and those familiar with BOSTON'S GUN BIBLE).

I have scouted out a place in the badlands for long range shooting and one spot at about 1200 yards as well as 800 and 600.

Contact mlaughlin@eoffshore.com
http://www.eoffshore.com

BTW, check out the picture below. It was about 25 degrees, but notice that I'm not wearing a coat. 25 degrees in WY is as bad as 40 degrees in more humid climates.

http://www.eoffshore.com/prone1200yds.jpg
« Last Edit: January 07, 2003, 03:27:11 pm by eoffshore »
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redbeard

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2003, 06:48:41 pm »

Another Wyoming ally! Nice range - did you hit that 1200 yarder?
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Zxcv

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2003, 10:51:20 pm »

I may take you up on that, eoffshore. I've been wanting to try a little artillery practice with my Marlin 1895CB!  :D

I've got Boston's Gun Bible - good book!

Looks like you are laying in the mud, in that picture! I understand some people like to try this long-range stuff in the summer, when they can see their hits via the little dust-clouds.

What part of Wyoming do you live in? I was thinking of trying a short winter trip to get an idea how tough it is...

Also, have you been following events in your state government at all closely? We sure could use some information on what the issues and power-brokers are, that sort of thing.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2003, 10:52:20 pm by Zxcv »
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eoffshore

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2003, 05:31:02 pm »

Yes I regularly hit the target...but it's a very big target.  Not too difficult when it's calm, but when the wind kicks up things get difficult. The Long Range Shooter Simulator www.shooterready.com has been a great aid in getting this long range stuff on paper.

I'm in Worland. I shoot in the badlands east of Worland. I usually head out early in the morning before dawn, I like to get all my shooting done by about 2:00 PM before the ground thaws. Early, I keep my heavy coat on, but by 10:00 I ditch the coat and rely on the heavy hiking and thick shirt to keep me comfy. Wear only lightweight gloves, which just barely keep the chill off my fingers in the morning but provide better trigger feel.

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Robert H.

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2003, 05:18:34 am »

Eoffshore,

I had a couple questions I wondered if you (or anyone else from Wyoming) could address:

1.  How do you think Wyoming's population will react to the FSP and how we might fit in out there?
2.  If we go with county-centered strategies, what counties do you think might be best for FSPer's to take up residence and try to influence state government?
3.  What's the biggest adjustment (as far as you know or think) that outsiders would have to make to life in WY?
4.  What would be the FSP's biggest hurdle in trying to institute reforms in WY?

Any thoughts would be appreciated!   :)

eoffshore

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2003, 11:02:14 am »

> 1.  How do you think Wyoming's population will react to the FSP and how we might fit in out there?

Make sure the natives know you came to Wyoming because you admire the culture and geography. That's why I'm here and the natives are always amazed to learn that I took a substantial pay cut to move here.

>2.  If we go with county-centered strategies, what counties do you think might be best for FSPer's to take up residence and try to influence state government?

I'd say move to a county that is more inline with you personal nature. For those who want the features of "the big city", move to Casper or Cheyenne. Those seeking a small college town atmosphere, try Sheridan, Riverton, or Laramie. Sheridan's nice because you're close to Billings, MT (malls and all and no state sales tax). If you're the outdoorsy type, Pinedale, Buffalo, and Worland are my preferred. Buffalo has a huge city swimming pool and real nice (and used) park. If you're big into skiing and the "liberal atmosphere", try Jackson.

>3.  What's the biggest adjustment (as far as you know or think) that outsiders would have to make to life in WY?

No traffic. Few 24 hr grocery stores. I think the climate is a non-issue, it's so sunny and dry that low temps don't feel that cold. Change primary form of entertainment from organized events to your own adventures into the out of doors - hike or mtn bike the mountains, ride a motorcycle, go hunting or shooting, skiing, camping, nature watching, and snowmobiling

>4.  What would be the FSP's biggest hurdle in trying to institute reforms in WY?

Don't give the impression that you're here to reform Wyoming, but rather to enjoy and defend it's native culture of liberty and freedom.
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Newt

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2003, 04:20:28 pm »

Looks like you have jobs too!

*******************************************************
Wyoming Enjoys Low Jobless Rate, Exceptional Job Growth

Jan 13, 2003 (The Denver Post - Knight Ridder/Tribune Business News via COMTEX) -- Never having jumped on the high-tech bandwagon, Wyoming has avoided the long, hard fall off.

While the rest of the country, including Colorado, struggles with layoffs, Wyoming is experiencing an unemployment rate far below and job growth far above the national average.

"The high-tech bust just hasn't been that big of a deal here because we never had the big boom," said David Bullard, senior economist with the Research & Planning -- Labor Statistics division of the Wyoming State Government Employment Department. "We only had a little high tech, so we didn't have a lot to lose."

According to the latest numbers from Bullard's department, Wyoming job growth (measured on an over-the-year basis) increased slightly from 0.2 percent in October to 0.5 percent in November. That translated into a net gain of 1,200 jobs when compared with November 2001.

Wyoming's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased from 3.9 percent in October to 4.2 percent in November.

Meanwhile U.S. unemployment increased to 6.0 percent in November and the nation continued to lose jobs (down 0.1 percent) in over-the-year comparisons. In Colorado, about 43,700 jobs were lost in 2002, and as of November, the state's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 5.2 percent.

In the high-tech sector, Colorado's loss has been Wyoming's gain.

"We've actually benefited from the last IT (information technology) downturn in Colorado," said Jim Robinson, senior economist with the state Economic Analysis Division"A lot of people who lost their jobs on the Front Range are coming up to Cheyenne and Laramie.

"The job may pay three-quarters of what they were making, but the cost of living up here makes up the difference."
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Robert H.

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2003, 04:46:37 am »

Don't give the impression that you're here to reform Wyoming, but rather to enjoy and defend it's native culture of liberty and freedom.

Good advice and helpful info there, thanks!

Any particular issues or people that stand out in Wyoming politics that we should be aware of?

Robert H.

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2003, 07:53:51 am »

Quote
Any particular issues or people that stand out in Wyoming politics that we should be aware of?
THEY HATE THE FEDS!-- as in BLM, USFS, EPA, DEA, BATF, IRS, and probably every other federal agency.

I believe you are correct here.

One thing that has really impressed me about Wyoming has been the tone of the letters that I've read in its newspapers, particularly the Casper Star-Tribune.  I've never read such a wealth of anti-big government letters so consistently in any other state newspapers.  Alaska would have to be the next runner up, which is one reason why I rate it so highly.

I believe very strongly that a majority of the people in Wyoming would back our play, and on more issues than just economics.  If we articulate our agenda correctly, that is.

Zxcv

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Re:Drop by in Wyoming.
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2003, 12:07:30 am »

Quote
And everyplace outside of Cheyenne probably hates their state capitol.

This is unfortunate, as Cheyenne would be a prime destination for us.

On the other hand, if we change the political climate there, the rest of the state might warm up to us a bit.

I bet they aren't too crazy about Teton County, either.
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