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Author Topic: Recovering Welfareholic  (Read 18282 times)

PhileasFg

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Recovering Welfareholic
« on: February 13, 2006, 03:02:14 pm »

Greetings, all:

I've been posting on various boards in the FSP forum for about a week now. I'm definitely interested in joining the FSP and moving to NH as soon as circumstances permit. There's just one problem.

For most of my life, I've lived on government subsidies. This has included medicaid, Pell grants, and worst of all, Supplemental Security Income. Being liberty-minded, and against all forms of government-coerced income redistribution, I've resolved to repent of my hypocrisy  by parting company with the Social Security Administration, once and for all. I intend to secure full-time employment (the exact nature of which is unimportant) before my next check arrives.

Is my intention to do so enough that I could join the FSP, or would the moral choice be to first jettison the system, then join the FSP?
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cathleeninnh

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2006, 01:23:53 pm »

We all have been enmeshed in the "system" to one extent or another. I know a number of FSP members who are "on the dole". They aren't usually very vocal; I would think there might be some shame in admitting it. Being involved in the FSP and liberty activism has helped me examine my options. I imagine it could do the same for you. Isn't it better to get some distance from the problem, clear the mind and work to cut the ties, rather than sink back into the clutches of socialism?

Cathleen
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JasonPSorens

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2006, 06:18:38 pm »

After my wife got cancer, we decided not to file for disability even though she is clearly eligible and cannot work. I think if you've been on public assistance all your life, it's even more important to get off. You'd probably be surprised what you can accomplish when you have no other choice but to pay your own way. It will involve financial sacrifices, certainly, but you'll probably find an inner strength and satisfaction you haven't really known before. In New Hampshire, there will also be people able & willing to help you make the transition.
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"Educate your children, educate yourselves, in the love for the freedom of others, for only in this way will your own freedom not be a gratuitous gift from fate. You will be aware of its worth and will have the courage to defend it." --Joaquim Nabuco (1883), Abolitionism

UCCO2004

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2006, 08:45:46 pm »

The truth is that none of us, not even Libertarians, are pure and unsullied by welfare statism.  Most of us drive government roads that were financed by taxes, and maybe even built using eminent domain.  Many of us also attended public schools through our teenage years, and some of us later went on to attend public colleges.  At least Libertarians have an ethical approach that is fair to other people in that we would rather pay user fees, or pay back our student loans, than pass levies and raise taxes and otherwise force our neighbors to provide the services we enjoy.

I am one Libertarian who has been caught in the Catch-22 of welfare statism:  My parents sent me to attend public schools in a well-off suburban district here in Cincinnati, Ohio.  I had many positive experiences during elementary school, but many negative experiences in middle school and high school.  Some of my teachers were good, and some of my teachers were incompetent.  I also chose to attend one of the suburban campuses of the University of Cincinnati that my parents graduated from.  I had some extremely liberal professors in my liberal arts classes, but political views were mostly irrelevant in my graphic arts classes and my web design classes. 

Although I still oppose compulsory education, I no longer have an unthinking hatred of public schools, and I actually learned of the Libertarian Party from my government-purchased 12th-grade Citizenship textbook, at a time when I was drowning in the ideologies of leftism and environmentalism.  Had the government not invested in such an excellent high school textbook, would I have ever become a Libertarian?

I once wrote inflammatory guest columns and letters-to-the-editor of the local newspapers, some of which were actually printed in the late 1990s, relentlessly criticizing compulsory education as well as unequivocally supporting privatization.  This was motivated mostly by the bad experiences in middle school and high school, as well as the infantile attitude of Demopublican politicians that we should always support school levies, no matter how incompetently the public schools are run.

Privatization should still be considered as a legitimate option for improving education, although having benefited from public schools, I might simply be content to reform K-12 education.  There should be both middle school and high school admission standards similar to what public colleges have, thus eliminating bullies, wiggers, and at least some jocks.  There should also be user fees required from parents based on the number of children they have in public schools, thus eliminating any future use of school levies.  There should also be voluntary attendance, thus eliminating truancy officers.  There should not be school uniforms, sexually segregated classes, or anything else that is anti-individualism.
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PhileasFg

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2006, 12:29:47 am »

I was hoping for an "Aye" or a "Nay" as to whether I should actually sign the pledge while still a voluntary recipient of government funds. At times, I think I'd like to just walk into the Social Security office, and tell the desk clerk (he's very rude and condescending) that I rejoice in never having to look upon his ugly mug ever again. There would be something just so empowering about saying "no" to the government and getting away with it.
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freedomroad

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2006, 12:58:44 am »

Is my intention to do so enough that I could join the FSP, or would the moral choice be to first jettison the system, then join the FSP?

It doesn't matter.  You can be on government welfare and still be a member of the FSP.
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FreeBoB

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2006, 01:23:49 am »

Join, move, and people will help you get going in NH.  It's a wonderful thing to make enough to live well!  ;D

FSP Welcome Wagon:  http://www.freestateproject.org/community/welcomewagon/  (scroll down to the NH local groups too).
Visit NH Underground and talk to the folks on the Forum:  http://forum.soulawakenings.com/index.php
and the website too:  http://www.soulawakenings.com/
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David Wolfe

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2006, 01:45:38 am »

Don't hate the player, hate the game.  Everyone should take responsibility for themself, but the government's entangled in all our lives.  It certainly is in mine.  Even if you started your own business you'd still be dealing with taxes and regulations.
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lordpoee

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2006, 05:08:32 pm »

I was on Social Security for some time, but Liberty Mindedness helped me kick the habit. When they sent me my re-application form, I did not send it in. I have been happier sisnce. I make more money working (not to much more.) and i feel I have a stronger voice in society.

Socila Security tends to give people who could otherwise work, a crutch. I was awlays waiting for "the perfect job" it never came along, and probably never would have.

From my check they take out over six hunderd dollars every year. The Average Social Security check is about $600.

Thats means for one person in america to recieve a monthly check for $600, it takes no less than twelve people in my tax bracket paying into social security.

This logic alone shows that Social Security is a DOOMED system.


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RidleyReport

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2006, 06:24:06 pm »

Phileas thanks for being candid ; you're 100% better than the majority of socialist security recipients who pine for more aid , or against any reform, with no remorse about the money they've received or the way it was taken.

Far as I'm concerned you're welcome here. 
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Power Penguin

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2006, 06:44:39 pm »

PhileasFg, don't worry. It's not that you were a government dependent then, it's that you're doing something about it NOW! In some ways, this shows that you are a stronger person than a lot of us, because you had more to 'loose' in terms of kickbacks. In the long run, as communist as this sounds, you really do have "nothing to loose but your chains". BTW, I think this came from Paine, et al before Marx anyway, which makes sense. Communism is good at ripping off and mass producing useless crap but very bad at coming up with new ideas! D)

BTW, in terms of job skills, what do you have? I'm trying to start a security and privacy buisiness that caters primarily to activists and pro-liberty buisinesspeople that want to do what they're doing without governmental and frivilous (spelling?) legal harassment. In short, I need people with tech skills primarily, but also legal minds and even a few 'grunts'!
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PhileasFg

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2006, 03:02:22 pm »

BTW, in terms of job skills, what do you have? I'm trying to start a security and privacy buisiness that caters primarily to activists and pro-liberty buisinesspeople that want to do what they're doing without governmental and frivilous (spelling?) legal harassment. In short, I need people with tech skills primarily, but also legal minds and even a few 'grunts'!

My resume can be found at: http://babylon.d2dc.net/~phileasfg/cac_resume.pdf
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lloydbob1

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2006, 03:16:03 pm »

The truth is that none of us, not even Libertarians, are pure and unsullied by welfare statism.  Most of us drive government roads that were financed by taxes, and maybe even built using eminent domain.  Many of us also attended public schools through our teenage years, and some of us later went on to attend public colleges.  At least Libertarians have an ethical approach that is fair to other people in that we would rather pay user fees, or pay back our student loans, than pass levies and raise taxes and otherwise force our neighbors to provide the services we enjoy.

I am one Libertarian who has been caught in the Catch-22 of welfare statism:  My parents sent me to attend public schools in a well-off suburban district here in Cincinnati, Ohio.  I had many positive experiences during elementary school, but many negative experiences in middle school and high school.  Some of my teachers were good, and some of my teachers were incompetent.  I also chose to attend one of the suburban campuses of the University of Cincinnati that my parents graduated from.  I had some extremely liberal professors in my liberal arts classes, but political views were mostly irrelevant in my graphic arts classes and my web design classes. 

Although I still oppose compulsory education, I no longer have an unthinking hatred of public schools, and I actually learned of the Libertarian Party from my government-purchased 12th-grade Citizenship textbook, at a time when I was drowning in the ideologies of leftism and environmentalism.  Had the government not invested in such an excellent high school textbook, would I have ever become a Libertarian?

I once wrote inflammatory guest columns and letters-to-the-editor of the local newspapers, some of which were actually printed in the late 1990s, relentlessly criticizing compulsory education as well as unequivocally supporting privatization.  This was motivated mostly by the bad experiences in middle school and high school, as well as the infantile attitude of Demopublican politicians that we should always support school levies, no matter how incompetently the public schools are run.

Privatization should still be considered as a legitimate option for improving education, although having benefited from public schools, I might simply be content to reform K-12 education.  There should be both middle school and high school admission standards similar to what public colleges have, thus eliminating bullies, wiggers, and at least some jocks.  There should also be user fees required from parents based on the number of children they have in public schools, thus eliminating any future use of school levies.  There should also be voluntary attendance, thus eliminating truancy officers.  There should not be school uniforms, sexually segregated classes, or anything else that is anti-individualism.

If you and/or your parents pay taxes, then using public roads and education is not, technically, welfare.
Between road taxes and the out of pocket costs of government college tuition, books, other costs, you're probably paying more in than you would if they were private.
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Power Penguin

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2006, 02:44:28 am »

BTW, in terms of job skills, what do you have? I'm trying to start a security and privacy buisiness that caters primarily to activists and pro-liberty buisinesspeople that want to do what they're doing without governmental and frivilous (spelling?) legal harassment. In short, I need people with tech skills primarily, but also legal minds and even a few 'grunts'!

My resume can be found at: http://babylon.d2dc.net/~phileasfg/cac_resume.pdf

I just read your resume. Not bad for a so called 'welfare queen'! 8-) If you or anyone else is seriously interested in this idea, PM me and we can  exchange career history info, buisiness ideas, etc.
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maxxoccupancy

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Re: Recovering Welfareholic
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2006, 01:18:13 am »

I grew up in public housing, attended public schools, received federal financial aid, and am now drawing unemployment benefits.  The purpose of all of these programs is psychological dependency.  If you are thinking like a libertarian, you have broken that grip already.  It is much better to work, even if you make the same amount of money, but getting off the dole is separate from voting proliberty.

It doesn't make sense for the public sector unions to take your money, then make you go back to some government office to get some of your own money back.  When you realize that this is a big vote buying system (like the old system of big city party bosses buying votes--helping their cronies get elected), you see why the system is set up the way it is.

First, vote against the good ol' boy network, then try to get back on your feet.

--Max
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